Dr Paa Kwesi Baidoo, MD - KATH

Dr Paa Kwesi Baidoo

MD

KATH

KUMASI, Ghana | Ghana

Main Specialties: Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Orthopaedic Trauma, Orthopaedics

Additional Specialties: ORTHOPAEDIC/TRAUMA

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-4028-1911

Dr Paa Kwesi Baidoo, MD - KATH

Dr Paa Kwesi Baidoo

MD

Introduction

Motivated and affable orthopedic surgeon with in-depth knowledge in my field. Dedicated to the need of my patients

Primary Affiliation: KATH - KUMASI, Ghana , Ghana

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:


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Publications

13Publications

137Reads

147Profile Views

2PubMed Central Citations

THE PATTERN OF HIP FRACTURES OVER A TEN-YEAR PERIOD IN A MAJOR REFERRAL CENTRE IN GHANA

Postgraduate Medical Journal of Ghana

Abstract Background: The incidence of hip fractures is projected to increase worldwide and so are the associated morbidity, mortality, and cost of managing patients with hip fractures. There is, however, scarcity of data on trend and incidence of hip fractures in sub-Saharan Africa making planning and management difficult. Methods: This is a retrospective study that involves all hip fractures seen and admitted to Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital in Accra, Ghana from 2007 to 2016. The demographic characteristic (sex and age), mechanism of injury, and the fracture type were documented. Association between age, sex, and mechanism of injury and type of fracture were determined by Chi-square, with p-value< 0.05 as the level of significance. Results: Nine hundred and twenty-nine patients were admitted over the 10-year period. There were 492 (53%) females and 437 (47%) males, a ratio of 1.1:1.0. The mean age was 72.2 ± 14.4 years. Falls which mostly were low energy constituted 726 (78.1%) of cases with 203 (21.9%) resulting from road traffic accidents (RTA). There was an increase in patients with hip fractures from 2007 to 2012 followed by a gradual decline. Approximately 490 (52.7%) and 439 (47.3%) of the cases were extracapsular and intracapsular respectively. There was strong association between age and mechanism of injury (X2 (2) =492.10, p < 0.001, Φ =0.73) and moderate association between sex and mechanism of injury (X2 (1) =37.50, p < 0.00, Φ =0.21). There was no significant association between sex or age and the type of fracture (p>0.05) Conclusions: This study shows a 10-year trend of hip fractures in a major referral hospital in Ghana. It will serve as a baseline information for a nationwide study on the incidence rate of hip fracture in the country. It also has a great implication for future planning and management. Key Words: Hip fracture, Ghana, trend, type of fracture, mechanism of injury INTRODUCTION Hip fracture is a break in the continuity of the proximal portion of the femur which may be associated with soft tissue injuries around the hip. The incidence of hip fractures, as well as the treatment outcomes in Ghana, are not known as these have not been documented or published, though there are many centers in the country that manage these injuries on a daily basis. However, the incidence of hip fractures worldwide is expected to exceed 6 million cases by 20501. Data from the United States Agency for Healthcare Research and Quantity (AHRQ) indicated that a total of 310,000 persons were admitted in 2003 in the United States for hip fractures and that alone accounted for 30% of hospital admissions2. Approximately 10 to 15 billion dollars is spent annually treating these injuries3-6. A study by Brauer et al7 examined the trend and accompanying mortality following hip fractures over a 20 year period. They found a steady decline in the incidence rate between 1995 and 2005 after an initial rise in 1986 to 1995. They postulated that the increased awareness of bisphosphonates, calcium, and vitamin D supplementation among other reasons accounted for the decline. In most Asian countries, the incidence of hip fractures has doubled or tripled over the last 30 years. A result of an aging population with osteoporosis, which by 2050, may be the cause of over 50% of these fractures8, 9. There is a limited number of studies on the incidence and pattern of hip fractures from Africa(10). Studies by Zebaze et al (57.1 per 100,000/year in females and 43.7 per 100,000/year in males over 35 years) in Cameroon and El Maghraoui et al (80 per 100,000/year for females and 50 per 100,000/year for men in Rabat, Morocco) from Morocco reported low rates of hip fractures. Dhanwal et al concluded that it was quite difficult to make a conclusive statement on the incidence of hip fractures based on these somewhat well-researched studies from Africa10 and postulated however that among the black population in America, the rates of hip fractures is lower in the African population than in the western population.

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September 2018
5 Reads

THE PATTERN OF HIP FRACTURES OVER A TEN-YEAR PERIOD IN A MAJOR REFERRAL CENTRE IN GHANA

Postgraduate Medical Journal of Ghana Volume 7 Number 2

ABSTRACT Background: The incidence of hip fractures is projected to increase worldwide and so are the associated morbidity, mortality, and cost of managing patients with hip fractures. There is, however, scarcity of data on trend and incidence of hip fractures in sub-Saharan Africa making planning and management difficult. Methods: This is a retrospective study that involves all hip fractures seen and admitted to Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital in Accra, Ghana from 2007 to 2016. The demographic characteristic (sex and age), mechanism of injury, and the fracture type were documented. Association between age, sex, and mechanism of injury and type of fracture were determined by Chi-square, with p-value< 0.05 as the level of significance. Results: Nine hundred and twenty-nine patients were admitted over the 10-year period. There were 492 (53%) females and 437 (47%) males, a ratio of 1.1:1.0. The mean age was 72.2 ± 14.4 years. Falls which mostly were low energy constituted 726 (78.1%) of cases with 203 (21.9%) resulting from road traffic accidents (RTA). There was an increase in patients with hip fractures from 2007 to 2012 followed by a gradual decline. Approximately 490 (52.7%) and 439 (47.3%) of the cases were extracapsular and intracapsular respectively. There was strong association between age and mechanism of injury (X2 (2) =492.10, p < 0.001, Φ=0.73) and moderate association between sex and mechanism of injury (X2 (1) =37.50, p < 0.00, Φ =0.21). There was no significant association between sex or age and the type of fracture (p>0.05) Conclusions: This study shows a 10-year trend of hip fractures in a major referral hospital in Ghana. It will serve as a baseline information for a nationwide study on the incidence rate of hip fracture in the country. It also has a great implication for future planning and management.

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September 2018
233 Reads

Tuberculous tenosynovitis of the flexor tendons of the wrist: a case report.

BMC Res Notes 2018 Apr 10;11(1):238. Epub 2018 Apr 10.

Department of Chest Diseases (Internal Medicine), Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, P.O. Box 77, Accra, Ghana.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13104-018-3343-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5894222PMC
April 2018
37 Reads
1 Citation

Tuberculous tenosynovitis of the flexor tendons of the wrist: A case Report.

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Introduction Tuberculous tenosynovitis of the flexor tendons of the wrist also referred to, as a compound palmar ganglion is uncommon. It has a classical clinical presentation and histopathology confirms it. Case Presentation We present a case of a 65 year old Ghanaian female with a two-year history of a progressively enlarging dumbbell shaped mass over the volar surface of the right wrist and palm. She did not have a previous history of tuberculosis. However, her Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) was high and Mantoux test was strongly positive (more than 15mm). Radiograph of ulna, radius and wrist showed osteopenic changes of the distal radius. Findings at excision biopsy were inflamed, thickened synovia and rice bodies. Tissue samples were submitted for histological and microbial studies. Anti-tuberculous therapy was commenced on the second postoperative day. Conclusion Tuberculous tenosynovitis of the wrist is uncommon. However in developing countries like Ghana where tuberculosis is prevalent, it should be part of the differential diagnosis of compound palmar ganglion in order to prevent delayed diagnosis and treatment.

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January 2016
3 Reads

International orthopaedic Multicentre study (INORMUS) in fracture care: Protocol for a large prospective observational study INORMUS investigators

Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma

Despite the fact that orthopaedic trauma injuries represent a serious cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, there are few data in low-middle income countries quantifying the burden of fractures and describing current treatment practices. To address this critical knowledge gap, a large multinational prospective observational study of 40,000 patients with musculoskeletal trauma in Africa, Asia, and Latin America is proposed. The International Orthopaedic Multicentre Study in Fracture Care (INORMUS) study seeks to determine the incidence of major complications (mortality, reoperation, and infection) within 30 days after a musculoskeletal injury and to determine patient, treatment, and system factors associated with these major complications in low-middle income countries. This study coincides with the World Health Organization's Global Road Traffic Safety Decade (2011-2020) and other international efforts to reduce the burden of injury on developing populations. Insight gained from the INORMUS study will not only inform the global burden of orthopaedic trauma but also drive the development of future randomized trials to evaluate simple solutions and practical interventions to decrease deaths and improve the quality of life for trauma patients worldwide.

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October 2015
8 Reads

An observational cohort study of the adoption of elastic stable intramedullary nailing for the treatment of pediatric femur fractures in Kumasi, Ghana.

World J Surg 2014 Nov;38(11):2818-24

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Institute for Global Orthopaedics and Traumatology, University of California, 2550 23rd Street, Building 9, 2nd Floor, San Francisco, CA, 94110, USA,

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00268-014-2664-2DOI Listing
November 2014
100 Reads
1 Citation
2.642 Impact Factor

Congenital transmesenteric defect causing bowel strangulation in an adult.

Hernia 2010 Dec 29;14(6):643-5. Epub 2009 Nov 29.

Hernia

Congenital transmesenteric hernias represent a very small group of internal hernias which are uncommon and are a rare cause of intestinal obstruction. Diagnosis is frequently made at surgery. Reports of congenital transmesenteric hernia in the English literature usually involve the pediatric population; adult cases are rarer. A 22-year-old man who presented with a day's history of severe abdominal pain but without classic physical examination signs of abdominal obstruction was operated upon on account of increasing abdominal pain and distention associated with shock. Laparotomy revealed a congenital transmesenteric defect through which loops of bowel had herniated and become gangrenous, resulting in resection and end-to-end anastomosis. Congenital transmesenteric defects causing internal hernias in adults are rare. Preoperative diagnosis of the condition is difficult, in part, because there are no radiographic or laboratory findings to confirm the suspicion. Misdiagnosis resulting in delayed exploration may lead to small bowel necrosis and subsequent mortality. A congenital internal hernia should be considered in a patient with bowel obstruction without previous abdominal surgery, inflammatory abdominal condition, or trauma. We wish to emphasize that, rather than trying to establish a correct diagnosis, the patient's clinical features should lead to early surgery in order to reduce morbidity and possible mortality.

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December 2010
89 Reads