Publications by authors named "P Veronesi"

334 Publications

The Effect of Zr Addition on Melting Temperature, Microstructure, Recrystallization and Mechanical Properties of a Cantor High Entropy Alloy.

Materials (Basel) 2021 Oct 12;14(20). Epub 2021 Oct 12.

Department of Engineering "Enzo Ferrari", University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Pietro Vivarelli 10, 41125 Modena, Italy.

The effect of Zr addition on the melting temperature of the CoCrFeMnNi High Entropy Alloy (HEA), known as the "Cantor's Alloy", is investigated, together with its micro-structure, mechanical properties and thermomechanical recrystallization process. The base and Zr-modified alloys are obtained by vacuum induction melting of mechanically pre-alloyed powders. Raw materials are then cold rolled and annealed. recrystallization occurred during the heat treatment of the cold-rolled HEA. The alloys are characterized by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, thermal analyses, mechanical spectroscopy and indentation measures. The main advantages of Zr addition are: (1) a fast vacuum induction melting process; (2) the lower melting temperature, due to Zr eutectics formation with all the Cantor's alloy elements; (3) the good chemical alloy homogeneity; and (4) the mechanical properties improvement of re-crystallized grains with a coherent structure. The crystallographic lattice of both alloys results in FCC. The Zr-modified HEA presents a higher recrystallization temperature and smaller grain size after recrystallization with respect to the Cantor's alloy, with precipitation of a coherent second phase, which enhances the alloy hardness and strength.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ma14205994DOI Listing
October 2021

Breast Cancer Surgery: New Issues.

Curr Oncol 2021 Oct 11;28(5):4053-4066. Epub 2021 Oct 11.

Division of Breast Surgery, IEO European Institute of Oncology, IRCCS, 20141 Milan, Italy.

Since ancient times, breast cancer treatment has crucially relied on surgeons and clinicians making great efforts to find increasingly conservative approaches to cure the tumor. In the Halstedian era (mid-late 19th century), the predominant practice consisted of the radical and disfiguring removal of the breast, much to the detriment of women's psycho-physical well-being. Thanks to enlightened scientists such as Professor Umberto Veronesi, breast cancer surgery has since impressively progressed and adopted a much more conservative approach. Over the last three decades, a better understanding of tumor biology and of its significant biomarkers has made the assessment of genetic and molecular profiles increasingly important. At the same time, neo-adjuvant treatments have been introduced, and great improvements in genetics, imaging technologies and in both oncological and reconstructive surgical techniques have been made. The future of breast cancer management must now rest on an ever more precise and targeted type of surgery that, through an increasingly multidisciplinary and personalized approach, can ensure oncological radicality while offering the best possible quality of life.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/curroncol28050344DOI Listing
October 2021

Oncoplastic Breast-Conserving Surgery for Synchronous Multicentric and Multifocal Tumors: Is It Oncologically Safe? A Retrospective Matched-Cohort Analysis.

Ann Surg Oncol 2021 Oct 6. Epub 2021 Oct 6.

Department of Breast Surgery, European Institute of Oncology, IRCCS, Milan, Italy.

Background: Oncoplastic surgery is a well-established approach that combines breast-conserving treatment for breast cancer and plastic surgery techniques. Although this approach already has been described for multicentric and multifocal tumors, no long-term oncologic follow-up evaluation and no comparison with patients undergoing mastectomy have been published. This study aimed to evaluate whether oncoplastic surgery is a safe and reliable treatment for managing invasive primary multicentric and multifocal breast cancer.

Methods: The study compared a consecutive series of 100 patients with multicentric or multifocal tumors who had undergone oncoplastic surgery (study group) with 100 patients who had multicentric or multifocal tumors and had undergone mastectomy (control group) during a prolonged period. The end points evaluated were disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), cumulative incidence of local recurrence (CI-L), regional recurrence (CI-R), and distant recurrence (CI-D), all measured from the date of surgery.

Results: The OS and DFS were similar between the two groups. The incidence of local events was higher in the oncoplastic group, whereas the incidence of regional events was slightly higher in the mastectomy group. These differences were not statistically significant. The cumulative incidence of distant events was similar between the two groups.

Conclusions: To the authors' knowledge, the current study provides the best available evidence suggesting that the oncoplastic approach is a safe and reliable treatment for managing invasive multifocal and multicentric breast cancers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1245/s10434-021-10800-wDOI Listing
October 2021

Multistage Latissimus Dorsi Flap with Implant for Complex Post-Mastectomy Reconstruction: An Old but Still Current Technique.

Breast Care (Basel) 2021 Aug 4;16(4):396-401. Epub 2020 Nov 4.

Division of Breast Surgery, University of Milan, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy.

Introduction: The latissimus dorsi (LD) flap has been used for reconstructing mastectomy defects since the early 1900s. Although its popularity has declined over the last decades, it still retains an important role in breast reconstruction. We present our recent experience with the multistage LD flap and implant for extremely complex post-mastectomy defects.

Patients And Methods: Between 2011 and 2020, 42 consecutive patients underwent post-mastectomy LD reconstruction with an expander (STAGE 1). Some of them received prior fat-grafting of the mammary region (STAGE 0). All patients were scheduled for an expander-definitive implant change (STAGE 2). Some of them completed the program with fat-grafting, nipple and areola reconstruction, and other refinements (STAGE 3 or 4).

Results: Two patients underwent fat-grafting at STAGE 0. Mean age at STAGE 1 was 46.7 years, mean BMI was 23.6, 14.4% of the patients were smokers, and 21.4% had comorbidities. Immediate reconstructions were performed in 35.7% and delayed in 64.3%. Mean surgical time at STAGE 1 was 194.7 min for delayed reconstructions and 242.3 min for immediate ones. Mean hospital stay for STAGE 1 procedures was 3.8 days; all other STAGES were performed as ambulatory surgery. No flap necrosis was observed and only 1 patient required a surgical revision for bleeding. Dorsal seroma occurred in 45.2% of cases.

Conclusions: The multistage LD flap with implant is a useful and safe tool within the reconstructive armamentarium for post-mastectomy defects. It combines multiple simple procedures and does not require specific skills and surgical training (level of evidence 4).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000511328DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8436649PMC
August 2021
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