Publications by authors named "P V K Praveen"

115 Publications

Novel In-House Design for Fibula Cutting Guide With Detachable Connecting Arm for Head and Neck Reconstruction.

J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2021 Mar 2. Epub 2021 Mar 2.

Consultant Maxillofacial/Head and Neck Surgeon, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK.

The use of in-house 3D planning and manufacture has become more common in high-volume head and neck reconstructive centers worldwide. Various fibula cutting guides have been designed to allow for accurate and predictable head and neck reconstruction. In this paper, we describe the design, manufacture, and operative technique for use of a novel fibula cutting guide with detachable connecting arms. This straightforward design produces a guide that is less bulky, provides better access for safe osteotomies, and is versatile and adjustable to minimize bone removal between segments.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joms.2021.02.035DOI Listing
March 2021

Assessing the potential of purple phototrophic microbial community for nitrogen recycling from ammonia-rich medium and anaerobic digestate.

Bioresour Technol 2021 Jan 23;320(Pt B):124436. Epub 2020 Nov 23.

Scion, Te Papa Tipu Innovation Park, 49 Sala Street, Rotorua, New Zealand.

Purple phototrophic bacteria (PPB) community, enriched from municipal wastewater, was characterized to assess their growth, tolerance, composition and potential for resource recovery from NH-rich medium. Batch experiments were conducted in tissue culture flasks and glass bottles under anaerobic conditions with infra-red lights. PPBs showed remarkable tolerance to high concentrations of NH-N and acetate. Below 1.5 g/L, growth was unaffected by NH-N with optical density at 590 nm (OD) reaching 2.6-2.9, while they could tolerate 4.5 g/L NH-N. Similarly, PPB growth was unaffected at acetate concentrations below 4 g/L and they could tolerate >20 g/L acetate. Taxonomic characterization showed that the community comprised of 37-52% PPBs (with 15-20% proteins) under different conditions, with Rhodobacter sp. over Rhodopseudomonas sp. dominating at higher NH-N concentrations. PPBs showed growth and removal rates in anaerobic digestate and accumulated 26% proteins. These results indicated the potential of PPBs in resource recovery from NH-rich wastewater.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2020.124436DOI Listing
January 2021

Effects of C-Terminal B-Chain Modifications in a Relaxin 3 Agonist Analogue.

ACS Med Chem Lett 2020 Nov 22;11(11):2336-2340. Epub 2020 Oct 22.

The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia.

The receptor for the neuropeptide relaxin 3, relaxin family peptide 3 (RXFP3) receptor, is an attractive pharmacological target for the control of eating, addictive, and psychiatric behaviors. Several structure-activity relationship studies on both human relaxin 3 (containing 3 disulfide bonds) and its analogue A2 (two disulfide bonds) suggest that the C-terminal carboxylic acid of the tryptophan residue in the B-chain is important for RXFP3 activity. In this study, we have added amide, alcohol, carbamate, and ester functionalities to the C-terminus of A2 and compared their structures and functions. As expected, the C-terminal amide form of A2 showed lower binding affinity for RXFP3 while ester and alcohol substitutions also demonstrated lower affinity. However, while these analogues showed slightly lower binding affinity, there was no significant difference in activation of RXFP3 compared to A2 bearing a C-terminal carboxylic acid, suggesting the binding pocket is able to accommodate additional atoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsmedchemlett.0c00456DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7667869PMC
November 2020

Change in prevalence of Coronary Heart Disease and its risk between 1991-94 to 2010-12 among rural and urban population of National Capital Region, Delhi.

Indian Heart J 2020 Sep - Oct;72(5):403-409. Epub 2020 Aug 9.

Public Health Foundation of India, Gurgaon, India.

Objectives: We aimed to measure the change in prevalence of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) and Cardiovascular Diseases (CVDs) risk among those aged 35-64 years in urban and rural areas of National Capital Region (NCR) of Delhi, between 1991-1994 (survey 1) and 2010-2012 (survey 2).

Methods: Both surveys used similar sampling methodology and mean ages of participants were similar. A total of 3048 and 2052 subjects were studied in urban Delhi and 2487 and 1917 participants recruited from rural Ballabgarh in survey 1 and in survey 2 respectively. CHD was diagnosed based on a Minnesota coded ECG and Rose angina questionnaire. Data on behavioural, physical, clinical and biochemical parameters were collected using standard methods. CVD Risk of participants was calculated using the gender specific Framingham risk equation.

Results: The age and sex standardised prevalence of CHD in urban Delhi increased from 10.3% (95% CI: 9.2-11.4) to 14.1% (95% CI: 12.6-15.6) between the two surveys as compared to an increase from 6.0% (95% CI: 5.0-6.9) to 7.4% (95% CI: 6.3-8.6) in rural Ballabgarh. The highest increase in the prevalence of CHD was reported among urban women (10.1% to 16.6%).The proportion of population with high 10-year CVD risk increased to 4.1% from 1.2% in rural areas as compared to 4.8% from 2.5% in urban areas.

Conclusions: The CHD and CVD risk has increased over 20 years period in and around Delhi and the increase was more in rural population and women, traditionally considered to be at low risk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ihj.2020.08.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7670492PMC
May 2021

Tracheal Stenosis after Tracheostomy.

Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2021 01 19;59(1):82-85. Epub 2020 Aug 19.

Maxillofacial Surgery, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, B15 2TH.

Introduction: Tracheal stenosis is a late and usually non-life threatening complication of surgical and percutaneous tracheostomies (PDT) as well as delayed endotracheal extubation.

Methods: We undertook a retrospective review of all patients who underwent a surgical tracheostomy over a 10 year period. Patients were included in the study if they had CT or MRI imaging of the tracheostomy site both pre-operatively and six or more weeks post operatively. Patients whose imaging was not available were excluded (n = 3) as were those patients who still had a tracheostomy in situ (n = 8). In total 91 patients were included in the study. In the same period 1170 surgical tracheostomies were performed by the maxillofacial surgeons. The images were analysed by a radiologist and the degree of stenosis reported.

Results: All 91 patients underwent a tracheostomy with a window. 83 patients did not demonstrate any stenosis. Looking at the remaining 8 patients with stenosis: 6 patients had stenosis of less than 25%, 1 patient had stenosis between 25-50% and 1 patient had stenosis greater than 50%. Both patients with stenosis greater than 25% had more than one surgical tracheostomy.

Conculsion: We have shown that the risk of stenosis is 8.8%, lower than often quoted in literature, and when it occurs it is likely to be symptomatic only in severe stenosis. Our main risk of stenosis was repeat surgical tracheostomies which also seems to be linked to a greater degree of stenosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjoms.2020.08.036DOI Listing
January 2021