Publications by authors named "P V Bhagwat"

42 Publications

Characterisation, pathogenicity and hydrolytic enzyme profiling of selected Fusarium species and their inhibition by novel coumarins.

Arch Microbiol 2021 Apr 28. Epub 2021 Apr 28.

Department of Biotechnology and Food Science, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Durban University of Technology, P.O. BOX 1334, Durban, 4000, South Africa.

Three Fusarium species isolated locally were characterised by the amplification of their rDNA ITS region, host specificity, and hydrolytic enzyme production. The strains were identified as Fusarium pseudoanthophilum, which is being reported for the first time in South Africa, as well as F. foetens and F. fujikuroi. All the three strains were capable of infecting vegetables such as tomatoes, bell and cayenne peppers, belonging to the Solanaceae family. The Fusarium strains also showed significant production of cell wall degrading enzymes in vitro, such as amylase, cellulase, xylanase, and polygalacturonase, thus highlighting the possibilities of these enzymes as pathogenic factors. Subsequently, the strains were discovered to be susceptible to three halogenated coumarins. The most effective of the tested coumarins, 6-bromo3-2,2-dibromoacetyl-2H-chromen-2-one, showed MIC values of 0.125, 0.0625 and 0.125 mg/ml against F. foetens, F. pseudoanthophilum and F. fujikuroi, respectively. The antifungal potentials of the halogenated coumarins were confirmed in silico through PASS analysis, toxicity prediction and docking studies. Findings from this study demonstrate the use of these coumarins as potential control agents against the Fusarium species and other pathogenic fungi in general.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00203-021-02335-1DOI Listing
April 2021

Enhanced xylanase and endoglucanase production from Beauveria bassiana SAN01, an entomopathogenic fungal endophyte.

Fungal Biol 2021 Jan 9;125(1):39-48. Epub 2020 Oct 9.

Department of Biotechnology and Food Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Durban University of Technology, P O Box 1334, Durban, 4000, South Africa. Electronic address:

This study was undertaken to explore alternative applications of the widely known entomopathogenic/endophytic fungus, Beauveria bassiana, besides its sole use as a biocontrol agent. B. bassiana SAN01, was investigated for the production of two glycoside hydrolases, xylanase and endoglucanase under submerged conditions. Among the different biomass tested, wheat bran provided the best results for both xylanase and endoglucanase, and their production levels were further enhanced using response surface methodology. Under optimised conditions, heightened yields of 1061 U/ml and 23.03 U/ml were observed for xylanase and endoglucanase, respectively, which were 3.44 and 1.35 folds higher than their initial yields. These are the highest ever production levels reported for xylanase and endoglucanase from any B. bassiana strain or any known entomopathogenic fungi. Furthermore, the efficacy of xylanase/endoglucanase cocktail in the saccharification of sugarcane bagasse was evaluated. The highest amount of reducing sugar released from the pretreated biomass by the action of the crude Beauveria enzyme cocktail was recorded at 30°C after 8 h incubation. The significant activities of the hydrolytic enzymes recorded with B. bassiana in this study thus present promising avenues for the use of the entomopathogen as a new source of industrial enzymes and by extension, other biotechnological applications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.funbio.2020.10.003DOI Listing
January 2021

Plastic biodegradation: Frontline microbes and their enzymes.

Sci Total Environ 2021 Mar 6;759:143536. Epub 2020 Nov 6.

Department of Biotechnology and Food Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Durban University of Technology, P.O. Box 1334, Durban 4000, South Africa. Electronic address:

Plastic polymers with different properties have been developed in the last 150 years to replace materials such as wood, glass and metals across various applications. Nevertheless, the distinct properties which make plastic desirable for our daily use also threaten our planet's sustainability. Plastics are resilient, non-reactive and most importantly, non-biodegradable. Hence, there has been an exponential increase in plastic waste generation, which has since been recognised as a global environmental threat. Plastic wastes have adversely affected life on earth, primarily through their undesirable accumulation in landfills, leaching into the soil, increased greenhouse gas emission, etc. Even more damaging is their impact on the aquatic ecosystems as they cause entanglement, ingestion and intestinal blockage in aquatic animals. Furthermore, plastics, especially in the microplastic form, have also been found to interfere with chemical interaction between marine organisms, to cause intrinsic toxicity by leaching, and by absorbing persistent organic contaminants as well as pathogens. The current methods for eliminating these wastes (incineration, landfilling, and recycling) come at massive costs, are unsustainable, and put more burden on our environment. Thus, recent focus has been placed more on the potential of biological systems to degrade synthetic plastics. In this regard, some insects, bacteria and fungi have been shown to ingest these polymers and convert them into environmentally friendly carbon compounds. Hence, in the light of recent literature, this review emphasises the multifaceted roles played by microorganisms in this process. The current understanding of the roles played by actinomycetes, algae, bacteria, fungi and their enzymes in enhancing the degradation of synthetic plastics are reviewed, with special focus on their modes of action and probable enzymatic mechanisms. Besides, key areas for further exploration, such as the manipulation of microorganisms through molecular cloning, modification of enzymatic characteristics and metabolic pathway design, are also highlighted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.143536DOI Listing
March 2021

Characterization of coral associated ciliates and their interactions with disease lesion progression of Indian Scleractinian corals.

Microb Pathog 2020 Dec 12;149:104472. Epub 2020 Sep 12.

Biological Oceanography Division, CSIR-National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa, 403004, India.

Ciliates associated with advanced diseased lesions of Acropora sp. and Porites sp. in the field were isolated and characterised using microscopic and molecular analysis. The identified dominant coral-associated ciliates as Holosticha sp. and Cohnilembusverminus was propagated in vitro and taken for further study. Ciliates high cell numbers with substrate containing bacteria-free mucus confirms the feeding preference for nutrients in mucus instead of bacteria. Therefore, fatty acid composition of the coral mucus was analysed and noted for the different composition levels of SAFA, MUFA and PUFA in both the genera. This suggests the possible feed specific interactions of ciliates with coral mucus and tissues. Conversely, Holosticha sp. was observed for invading the host cells for its voracious ingestion of Symbiodiniaceae cells and tissues. Moreover, the aquarium based investigation revealed that the ciliates migrate to the injured and early disease signs of corals enhancing the tissue loss and disease lesion progression. Thus, our results indicate that the ciliates interact with the immunocompromised disease corals and play a major role in progression of disease lesions leading to rapid coral mortality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.micpath.2020.104472DOI Listing
December 2020