Publications by authors named "P Patki"

80 Publications

Growth and renal function dynamics of renal oncocytomas on active surveillance.

BJU Int 2021 May 28. Epub 2021 May 28.

Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London.

Objectives: To study the natural history of renal oncocytomas and address indications for intervention by determining how growth associates with renal function over time, the reasons for surgery and ablation, and disease-specific survival.

Patients And Methods: Retrospective cohort of consecutive patients with renal oncocytoma on active surveillance reviewed at the Specialist Centre for Kidney Cancer at Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust (2012 to 2019). Comparison between groups was tested using the Mann-Whitney U and the Chi-square tests. A mixed-effects model with a random intercept for patient was used to study the longitudinal association between tumour size and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR).

Results: Longitudinal data from 98 patients with 101 lesions was analysed. Most patients were male (68.3%), median age was 69 years (IQR 13). The median follow-up was 29 months (IQR 26). Most lesions were small renal masses, 24% measured over 4 cm. Over half (64.4%) grew at a median rate of 2 mm per year (IQR 4). No association was observed between tumour size and eGFR over time (p=0.871). Nine lesions (8.9%) were subsequently treated. Two deaths were reported, neither were related to the diagnosis of renal oncocytoma.

Conclusion: Natural history data from the largest active surveillance cohort of renal oncocytomas to date show that renal function does not seem to be negatively impacted by growing oncocytomas, and confirms clinical outcomes are excellent after a median follow up of over 2 years. Active surveillance should be considered the gold standard management of renal oncocytomas up to 7cm.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bju.15499DOI Listing
May 2021

Impact of the first surge of the COVID-19 pandemic on a tertiary referral centre for kidney cancer.

BJU Int 2021 May 8. Epub 2021 May 8.

Specialist Centre for Kidney Cancer, Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.

Objective: To analyse the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on a centralized specialist kidney cancer care pathway.

Materials And Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of patient and pathway characteristics including prioritization strategies at the Specialist Centre for Kidney Cancer located at the Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust (RFH) before and during the surge of COVID-19.

Results: On 18 March 2020 all elective surgery was halted at RFH to redeploy resources and staff for the COVID-19 surge. Prioritizing of patients according to European Association of Urology guidance was introduced. Clinics and the specialist multidisciplinary team (SMDT) meetings were maintained with physical distancing, kidney surgery was moved to a COVID-protected site, and infection prevention measurements were enforced. During the 7 weeks of lockdown (23 March to 10 May 2020), 234 cases were discussed at the SMDT meetings, 53% compared to the 446 cases discussed in the 7 weeks pre-lockdown. The reduction in referrals was more pronounced for small and asymptomatic renal masses. Of 62 low-priority cancer patients, 27 (43.5%) were deferred. Only one (4%) COVID-19 infection occurred postoperatively, and the patient made a full recovery. No increase in clinical or pathological upstaging could be detected in patients who underwent deferred surgery compared to pre-COVID practice.

Conclusion: The first surge of the COVID-19 pandemic severely impacted diagnosis, referral and treatment of kidney cancer at a tertiary referral centre. With a policy of prioritization and COVID-protected pathways, capacity for time-sensitive oncological interventions was maintained and no immediate clinical harm was observed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bju.15441DOI Listing
May 2021

Pattern, timing and predictors of recurrence after surgical resection of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma.

World J Urol 2021 Apr 13. Epub 2021 Apr 13.

Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London, UK.

Purpose: Currently there are no specific guidelines for the post-operative follow-up of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (chRCC). We aimed to evaluate the pattern, location and timing of recurrence after surgery for non-metastatic chRCC and establish predictors of recurrence and cancer-specific death.

Methods: Retrospective analysis of consecutive surgically treated non-metastatic chRCC cases from the Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust (UK, 2015-2019) and the international collaborative database RECUR (15 institutes, 2006-2011). Kaplan-Meier curves were plotted. The association between variables of interest and outcomes were analysed using univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models with shared frailty for data source.

Results: 295 patients were identified. Median follow-up was 58 months. The five and ten-year recurrence-free survival rates were 94.3% and 89.2%. Seventeen patients (5.7%) developed recurrent disease, 13 (76.5%) with distant metastases. 54% of metastatic disease diagnoses involved a single organ, most commonly the bone. Early recurrence (< 24 months) was observed in 8 cases, all staged ≥ pT2b. 30 deaths occurred, of which 11 were attributed to chRCC. Sarcomatoid differentiation was rare (n = 4) but associated with recurrence and cancer-specific death on univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, UICC/AJCC T-stage ≥ pT2b, presence of coagulative necrosis, and positive surgical margins were predictors of recurrence and cancer-specific death.

Conclusion: Recurrence and death after surgically resected chRCC are rare. For completely excised lesions ≤ pT2a without coagulative necrosis or sarcomatoid features, prognosis is excellent. These patients should be reassured and follow-up intensity curtailed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00345-021-03683-9DOI Listing
April 2021

The Fate of Ureteral Memokath Stent(s) in a High-Volume Referral Center: An Independent Long-Term Outcomes Review.

J Endourol 2021 02 23;35(2):180-186. Epub 2020 Sep 23.

Department of Urology, Royal London Hospital, Bart's Health NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom.

To independently assess upper urinary tract Memokath (MMK-051) stent outcomes in a national tertiary referral center. Two researchers, completely independent to the treating team, reviewed electronic MMK-051 stent(s) patient management records. Outcomes included time to first complication, complication(s)-severity, MMK-051 stent lifespan and change incidence, salvage therapy, further surgical intervention, and mortality. One hundred patients received 162 MMK-051 stent(s) (59% with malignant and 63% with distal ureteral obstruction [UO]) with only three lost to follow-up (FU). At 5-year mean FU, only 25 patients had complication-free original MMK-051 stents (14 alive, 11 dead). Of the remaining 75 patients, 22 had other stents, 12 had major surgery (e.g., nephrectomy), 3 became dialysis dependent, and 14 stabilized without ureteral stenting after original MMK-051 removal. Malignant obstruction patients had greater original MMK-051 stent longevity ( < 0.02), but also 20 of the 21 deaths (95%). The 72% mean 5-year stent complication rate included migration (46%), blockage (34%), nonfunctioning kidney (8%), urosepsis needing intravenous antibiotics (8%), and others (6%), including one postoperative death, one ureteral injury, and two with intractable pain. Median time to first complication was 12.5 months. MMK-051 stents had optimal utility in managing malignant UO and in those unfit for corrective surgery. Longer independently assessed mean 5-year outcomes review revealed much higher complication rates (72%) than previously reported. Future international metallic ureteral stent guidelines should encourage clinicians to adopt patient-centered multidisciplinary assessment and selection, with counseling plus goal-setting, and harmonized long-term protocol-based reporting, for optimized future patient safety and outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/end.2020.0542DOI Listing
February 2021