Publications by authors named "P F van der Meer"

502 Publications

K14 degradation and ageing in epidermolysis bullosa simplex due to KLHL24 gain-of-function mutations.

J Invest Dermatol 2022 Jan 11. Epub 2022 Jan 11.

University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Dermatology, Center for Blistering Diseases, Hanzeplein 1, 9713HE Groningen, The Netherlands. Electronic address:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jid.2021.12.027DOI Listing
January 2022

Pathophysiology and risk factors of peripartum cardiomyopathy.

Nat Rev Cardiol 2022 Jan 11. Epub 2022 Jan 11.

Department of Cardiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.

Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a potentially fatal form of idiopathic heart failure with variable prevalence across different countries and ethnic groups. The cause of PPCM is unclear, but environmental and genetic factors and pregnancy-associated conditions such as pre-eclampsia can contribute to the development of PPCM. Furthermore, animal studies have shown that impaired vascular and metabolic function might be central to the development of PPCM. A better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms involved in the development of PPCM is necessary to establish new therapies that can improve the outcomes of patients with PPCM. Pregnancy hormones tightly regulate a plethora of maternal adaptive responses, including haemodynamic, structural and metabolic changes in the cardiovascular system. In patients with PPCM, the peripartum period is associated with profound and rapid hormonal fluctuations that result in a brief period of disrupted cardiovascular (metabolic) homeostasis prone to secondary perturbations. In this Review, we discuss the latest studies on the potential pathophysiological mechanisms of and risk factors for PPCM, with a focus on maternal cardiovascular changes associated with pregnancy. We provide an updated framework to further our understanding of PPCM pathogenesis, which might lead to an improvement in disease definition.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41569-021-00664-8DOI Listing
January 2022

Iron Deficiency in Heart Failure: Mechanisms and Pathophysiology.

J Clin Med 2021 Dec 27;11(1). Epub 2021 Dec 27.

Department of Cardiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 30.001, 9700 RB Groningen, The Netherlands.

Iron is an essential micronutrient for a myriad of physiological processes in the body beyond erythropoiesis. Iron deficiency (ID) is a common comorbidity in patients with heart failure (HF), with a prevalence reaching up to 59% even in non-anaemic patients. ID impairs exercise capacity, reduces the quality of life, increases hospitalisation rate and mortality risk regardless of anaemia. Intravenously correcting ID has emerged as a promising treatment in HF as it has been shown to alleviate symptoms, improve quality of life and exercise capacity and reduce hospitalisations. However, the pathophysiology of ID in HF remains poorly characterised. Recognition of ID in HF triggered more research with the aim to explain how correcting ID improves HF status as well as the underlying causes of ID in the first place. In the past few years, significant progress has been made in understanding iron homeostasis by characterising the role of the iron-regulating hormone hepcidin, the effects of ID on skeletal and cardiac myocytes, kidneys and the immune system. In this review, we summarise the current knowledge and recent advances in the pathophysiology of ID in heart failure, the deleterious systemic and cellular consequences of ID.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm11010125DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8745653PMC
December 2021

Animal models and animal-free innovations for cardiovascular research: current status and routes to be explored. Consensus document of the ESC working group on myocardial function and the ESC Working Group on Cellular Biology of the Heart.

Cardiovasc Res 2022 Jan 6. Epub 2022 Jan 6.

Université de Paris, INSERM, PARCC, Paris, F-75015 France.

Cardiovascular diseases represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality, necessitating research to improve diagnostics, and to discover and test novel preventive and curative therapies. All of which warrant experimental models that recapitulate human disease. The translation of basic science results to clinical practice is a challenging task. In particular for complex conditions such as cardiovascular diseases, which often result from multiple risk factors and co-morbidities. This difficulty might lead some individuals to question the value of animal research, citing the translational 'valley of death', which largely reflects the fact that studies in rodents are difficult to translate to humans. This is also influenced by the fact that new, human-derived in vitro models can recapitulate aspects of disease processes. However, it would be a mistake to think that animal models cannot provide a vital step in the translational pathway as they do provide important pathophysiological insights into disease mechanisms particularly on a organ and systemic level. While stem cell-derived human models have the potential to become key in testing toxicity and effectiveness of new drugs, we need to be realistic, and carefully validate all new human-like disease models. In this position paper, we highlight recent advances in trying to reduce the number of animals for cardiovascular research ranging from stem cell-derived models to in situ modelling of heart properties, bioinformatic models based on large datasets, and improved current animal models, which show clinically relevant characteristics observed in patients with a cardiovascular disease. We aim to provide a guide to help researchers in their experimental design to translate bench findings to clinical routine taking the replacement, reduction and refinement (3R) as a guiding concept.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cvr/cvab370DOI Listing
January 2022

High selenium levels associate with reduced risk of mortality and new-onset heart failure: data from PREVEND.

Eur J Heart Fail 2021 Dec 20. Epub 2021 Dec 20.

Department of Cardiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Low selenium levels are not uncommon in several parts worldwide. We measured selenium concentrations in 5973 subjects of the PREVEND cohort, a general population prospective cohort of the city of Groningen. Of them, 4288 subjects were non-smokers and after a follow-up of 8.4 years, high selenium concentrations were associated with lower mortality as well as lower incidence of new-onset heart failure in these non-smokers. Non-smoking subjects with selenium concentrations of >110 µg/L had lower risk for these endpoints as they were close to the levels needed for optimal expression for selenoproteins (which is 123 µg/L). CI, confidence interval; HR, hazard ratio.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ejhf.2405DOI Listing
December 2021
-->