Publications by authors named "P C Chan"

4,345 Publications

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An early assessment of a case fatality risk associated with P.1 SARS-CoV-2 lineage in Brazil: an ecological study.

J Travel Med 2021 Jun 21. Epub 2021 Jun 21.

JC School of Public Health and Primary Care, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jtm/taab078DOI Listing
June 2021

Comparison of cutaneous facial temperature using infrared thermography to standard temperature measurement in the critical care setting.

J Clin Monit Comput 2021 Jun 17. Epub 2021 Jun 17.

School of Public Health and Prevention Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

To assess the accuracy and precision of infrared cameras compared to traditional measures of temperature measurement in a temperature, humidity, and distance controlled intensive care unit (ICU) population. This was a prospective, observational methods comparison study in a single centre ICU in Metropolitan Melbourne, Australia. A convenience sample of 39 patients admitted to a single room equipped with two ceiling mounted thermal imaging cameras was assessed, comparing measured cutaneous facial temperature via thermal camera to clinical temperature standards. Uncorrected correlation of camera measurement to clinical standard in all cases was poor, with the maximum reported correlation 0.24 (Wide-angle Lens to Bladder temperature). Using the wide-angle lens, mean differences were - 11.1 °C (LoA  - 14.68 to  - 7.51),  - 11.1 °C ( - 14.3 to  - 7.9), and  - 11.2 °C ( - 15.23 to  - 7.19) for axillary, bladder, and oral comparisons respectively (Fig. 1a). With respect to the narrow-angle lens compared to the axillary, bladder and oral temperatures, mean differences were  - 7.6 °C ( - 11.2 to  - 4.0),  - 7.5 °C ( - 12.1 to  - 2.9), and  - 7.9 °C ( - 11.6 to  - 4.2) respectively. AUCs for the wide-angle lens and narrow-angle lens ranged from 0.53 to 0.70 and 0.59 to 0.79 respectively, with axillary temperature demonstrating the greatest values. Infrared thermography is a poor predictor of patient temperature as measured by existing clinical standards. It has a moderate ability to discriminate fever. It is unclear if this would be sensitive enough for infection screening purposes. Fig. 1 Bland-Altman plots for temperatures measured using clinical standards to infrared camera. a Wide-angle camera versus bladder temperature. b Narrow-angle camera versus bladder temperature.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10877-021-00731-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8210498PMC
June 2021

Prognostic value of nocturnal blood pressure dipping on cardiovascular outcomes in Chinese patients with hypertension in primary care.

J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich) 2021 Jun 16. Epub 2021 Jun 16.

Department of Family Medicine and Primary Health Care, Kowloon East Cluster, Hospital Authority, Hong Kong, China.

Meta-analyses showed that non-dipping of nocturnal blood pressure on ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) was associated with adverse cardiovascular prognosis. However, these prognostic studies were mainly conducted in Caucasian and Japanese populations. Whether this association applies to Chinese patients remained uninvestigated. A total of 1199 Chinese patients with hypertension undergoing ABPM between January 2012 and December 2014 were recruited retrospectively from five public hypertension referral clinics in Hong Kong. Patients were followed up for a mean 6.42 years for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and all-cause mortality. Time to event of different dipping patterns was compared by Kaplan-Meier curves. Hazard ratios (HR) were obtained by Cox proportional hazard models with patient demographics and confounding factors adjusted in multivariate regression. A total of 163 end point events occurred in the period. Normal dipping was observed in 446 patients (37.2%), non-dipping in 490 (40.9%), reverse dipping in 161 (13.4%), and extreme dipping in 102 (8.5%). Kaplan-Meier analyses showed inferior survival in non-dippers and reverse dippers for total cardiovascular events and coronary events but not cerebrovascular events. After adjusting for confounding factors, Cox regressions showed HRs 1.166 (CI 0.770-1.764) and 1.173 (CI 0.681-2.021) in non-dippers and reverse dippers for total cardiovascular events, and HRs 1.320 (CI 0.814-2.141) and 1.476 (CI 0.783-2.784) for coronary events. Nocturnal blood pressure non-dipping, and to a greater extent reverse dipping, demonstrated adverse cardiovascular prognosis in a cohort of Chinese patients with hypertension in Hong Kong. Further focused studies on cerebrovascular events and reverse dippers were warranted to refine risk stratification.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jch.14304DOI Listing
June 2021

The test-retest reliability of the respiratory-related evoked potential.

Biol Psychol 2021 Jun 9;163:108133. Epub 2021 Jun 9.

Health Psychology, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.

The respiratory-related evoked potential (RREP) is an established technique to study the neural processing of respiratory sensations. We examined the test-retest reliability of the RREP during an unloaded baseline condition (no dyspnea) and an inspiratory resistive loaded breathing condition (dyspnea) over a one-week period. RREPs were evoked by short inspiratory occlusions (150 ms) while EEG was continuously measured. The mean amplitudes of the RREP components Nf, P1, N1, P2, and P3 were studied. For the no dyspnea condition, moderate test-retest reliability for Nf (intraclass correlation coefficient ICC: 0.73) and P1 (ICC: 0.74), good test-retest reliability for N1 (ICC: 0.89) and P3 (ICC: 0.76), and excellent test-retest reliability for P2 (ICC: 0.92) was demonstrated. For the dyspnea condition, moderate test-retest reliability was found for Nf (ICC: 0.69) and P1 (ICC: 0.57) and good test-retest reliability for N1 (ICC: 0.77), P2 (ICC: 0.84), and P3 (ICC: 0.77). This indicates that the RREP components Nf, P1, N1, P2, and P3, elicited by inspiratory occlusions, show adequate reliability in a test-retest study design with or without parallel sustained resistive load-induced dyspnea.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2021.108133DOI Listing
June 2021

Characterizing the Impact of COVID-19 on Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Care.

AIDS Behav 2021 Jun 10. Epub 2021 Jun 10.

Department of Medicine, Infectious Diseases, The Miriam Hospital, 14 Third Street, Providence, RI, 02906, USA.

COVID-19 is a public health crisis that has fundamentally altered health care provision. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of COVID-19 on pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) care. We reviewed all patient records for those who presented for PrEP care at a PrEP program in Providence, Rhode Island from September 1st, 2019 to May 29th, 2020. The number of PrEP encounters decreased but was not significantly different over time (ps > .05). Patients were still able to access PrEP clinical services during the COVID-19 pandemic. Implementing flexible and timely PrEP delivery approaches in this setting likely minimized the disruption of PrEP care during COVID-19.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10461-021-03337-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8191705PMC
June 2021