Publications by authors named "Ozgur Uyanik"

18 Publications

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Tooth Discoloration Induced by Different Calcium Silicate-Based Cements: A Two-Year Spectrophotometric and Photographic Evaluation in Vitro.

J Clin Pediatr Dent 2021 Apr;45(2):112-116

Objective: Calcium silicate-based cements (CSCs) may lead to coronal staining in young permanent teeth over the time. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the long-term tooth discoloration induced by different CSCs.

Study Design: Ninety freshly-extracted human molars were assigned randomly into 6 groups (n=15/group) according to the CSC used as a pulpotomy material: ProRoot MTA, MTA Angelus, NeoMTA, EndoSequence Putty, Biodentine and Negative control (No cement). The color was assessed at baseline, and thereafter at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months by using both a spectrophotometer and digital images taken with and without a cross-polarizing filter. The time-dependent changes in color (ΔE) were compared within and among groups using Analysis of Variance.

Results: Angelus MTA and ProRooT MTA showed severe coronal discoloration (p>0.05) starting at 3 months. ΔE values of NeoMTA, EndoSequence Bioceramic Putty and Biodentine were below the perceptibility threshold, with Biodentine showing greater ΔE values than NeoMTA and EndoSequence Putty in the absence of statistical significance (p>0.05).

Conclusions: Discoloration elicited by CSCs may develop soon after placement, and continue to increase for up to two years. Angelus MTA and ProRooT MTA cannot be recommended for vital pulp therapies in the esthetic zone of young individuals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.17796/1053-4625-45.2.7DOI Listing
April 2021

A micro-computed tomographic assessment of root canal preparation with conventional and different rotary files in primary teeth and young permanent teeth.

Int J Paediatr Dent 2020 Mar 17;30(2):202-208. Epub 2019 Nov 17.

Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.

Background: Root canals of primary teeth are commonly prepared with endodontic files that are originally manufactured for permanent teeth.

Aim: This micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) study evaluated and compared the changes in root canal morphology after preparation with different conventional and rotary files in primary teeth and young permanent teeth.

Design: Seventy-two extracted primary and permanent molars were selected and randomly assigned to three subgroups according to the file systems used (n = 12/each). After pre-scanning of teeth with micro-CT, root canals were prepared with One Shape and Revo-S rotary systems and conventional endodontic files. After rescanning procedure, changes in canal volume, surface area, uninstrumented surface area, and apical transportation were evaluated. Mann-Whitney U test, Kruskal-Wallis test, and Conover's multiple comparison test were used for statistical analysis (P = .05).

Results: Instrumentation with rotary files resulted in significantly greater volume and surface area of root canals and less uninstrumented areas (P < .001) than with manual files (P < .001). Primary molars showed significantly less apical transportation than permanent teeth (P < .001).

Conclusions: Preparation of canals with rotary files could be a viable alternative to conventional files in primary teeth. Regardless of the file system used, uninstrumented areas still exist in both primary teeth and permanent teeth.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ipd.12587DOI Listing
March 2020

Dentinal Tubule Penetration and Retreatability of a Calcium Silicate-based Sealer Tested in Bulk or with Different Main Core Material.

J Endod 2019 Aug 21;45(8):1036-1040. Epub 2019 Jun 21.

Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey; Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Louisiana University Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, New Orleans, Louisiana.

Introduction: The aim of this study was 2-fold: to evaluate the penetration of a tricalcium silicate-based endodontic sealer (EndoSequence BC Sealer; Brasseler USA, Savannah, GA) into dentinal tubules without a core material (sealer) or with .02 or .04 tapered bioceramic gutta-percha points and to compare the time required to remove the root fillings .

Methods: Roots of extracted human mandibular incisors (N = 60) were prepared with 0.04 taper nickel-titanium rotary files to #35 and randomly assigned into 3 groups (n = 10/group) according to the obturation method used: 1. obturating with sealer only, 2. sealer + .02 point, and 3. sealer + .04 point. The sealer was labeled with rhodamine B for analyzing dentinal tubule penetration under a confocal laser scanning microscope. The remaining specimens (n = 30) were used to measure the time for removal of the root canal fillings with retreatment files. The data were analyzed using 1-way analysis of variance and post hoc Games-Howell tests for dentinal tubule penetration and the Kruskal-Wallis test for retreatment time.

Results: Significantly greater sealer penetration and sealer-penetrated area was achieved when the sealer was used with a .04 gutta point (P < .05), whereas there was no difference between the sealer and .02 gutta point groups (P > .05). All test groups showed a similar depth of sealer penetration (P > .05). Groups with the gutta-percha points required a similar time to remove root filling (P > .05), whereas the working length could not be achieved in the sealer group.

Conclusions: The use of a matched-taper bioceramic gutta-percha point enhanced the dentinal tubule penetration of the tested tricalcium silicate-based sealer. The use of a core material in conjunction with sealer facilitates removal of the root filling to the working length.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joen.2019.04.010DOI Listing
August 2019

Effect of ultrasonic activation on dentinal tubule penetration of calcium silicate-based cements.

Microsc Res Tech 2019 May 5;82(5):624-629. Epub 2019 Jan 5.

Department of Endodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.

This study investigated the dentinal tubule penetration of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), NeoMTA Plus and Biodentine placed by either manual condensation or ultrasonic activation in simulated open apex model. Standardized divergent open apex models were created using palatal roots of 60 human maxillary molars and divided into six groups according to the used cements and activation methods (n = 10): MTA-manual condensation, MTA-ultrasonic activation, NeoMTA Plus-manual condensation, NeoMTA Plus-ultrasonic activation, Biodentine-manual condensation, Biodentine-ultrasonic activation. For the measurement of penetration, the cements were mixed with 0.1% Rhodamin B and 6-mm apical portions of each root canal were obturated in an orthograde direction. The roots were embedded into acrylic blocks, and 1-mm-thick sections were obtained at 3 mm from the apex. Specimens were mounted onto glass slides and scanned under a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) and stereomicroscope. Dentinal tubule penetration areas, depth and percentage were measured using LSM and ImageJ software. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (anova) with Bonferroni correction (α = 0.05). No correlation was found between stereomicroscope and CLSM analyses (p > .05). CLSM analysis showed no significant differences between MTA, NeoMTA Plus, and Biodentine groups when manual condensation was used (p > .05). Ultrasonic activation did not increase the tubular penetration of MTA, NeoMTA Plus or Biodentine as compared to manual condensation of each material (p > .05). MTA, NeoMTA Plus and Biodentine showed similar tubular penetration when manual condensation was used. Ultrasonic activation of these cements had no effect on tubular penetration of each material as compared to the manual condensation counterparts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jemt.23209DOI Listing
May 2019

Effect of phytic acid on the setting times and tensile strengths of calcium silicate-based cements.

Aust Endod J 2019 Aug 6;45(2):241-245. Epub 2018 Nov 6.

Department of Biomaterials Science, Turku Clinical Biomaterials Centre - TCBC, Institute of Dentistry, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.

This study aimed to evaluate and compare the effect of 1% phytic acid as a mixing medium on the setting times and diametral tensile strengths of different calcium silicate-based cements. Specimens for four experimental groups (n = 20/each) were fabricated by mixing ProRoot MTA (Dentsply) and Biodentine (Septodont) powders with their original liquids or with 1% phytic acid. Half of the samples in each group were immediately subjected to setting time tests, whereas the remaining half was subjected to the diametral tensile strength test after 3 weeks. When mixed with their original liquids, the setting time of MTA was significantly longer than that of Biodentine (P < 0.05). When mixed with phytic acid, the initial and final setting times of both test materials significantly decreased (P < 0.05). The diametral tensile strength of Biodentine was significantly greater than that of MTA (P < 0.05). However, phytic acid had no effect on this outcome (P > 0.05).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/aej.12314DOI Listing
August 2019

Revitalization of necrotic mature permanent incisors with apical periodontitis: a case report.

Restor Dent Endod 2018 Aug 5;43(3):e31. Epub 2018 Jul 5.

Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.

Despite considerable focus on the regenerative endodontic treatment of immature teeth with necrotic infected pulps and apical periodontitis, little data exist with regard to its possible implementation in necrotic permanent teeth with complete apical and radicular development. The present report describes the procedures and outcome of a regenerative endodontic treatment approach in 2 previously-traumatized incisors with closed apex with apical periodontitis. A 2-visit treatment procedure was employed. At initial visit, the root canals were copiously irrigated, followed by placement of a triple antibiotic paste containing ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, and clindamycin into the root canals. After 4 weeks, the antibiotic paste was removed, and apical bleeding was initiated with size 10 hand files beyond the apices. The root canals were coronally sealed with mineral trioxide aggregate, and the access cavities were restored with bonded resin composite. At post-operative 60 months, both teeth were remained asymptomatic, with the recall radiographs showing complete resolution of apical radiolucency and reestablishment of periradicular tissues. In both teeth, the dimensions of root space remained unchanged as verified by image analysis. The revitalization protocol utilizing root canal disinfection and induced apical bleeding in necrotic, closed-apex incisors may offer a clinically acceptable alternative to conventional root canal treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5395/rde.2018.43.e31DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6103546PMC
August 2018

Reinforcing Effect of Glass Fiber-incorporated ProRoot MTA and Biodentine as Intraorifice Barriers.

J Endod 2016 Nov 14;42(11):1673-1676. Epub 2016 Sep 14.

Department of Biomaterials Science and Turku Clinical Biomaterials Centre-TCBC, Institute of Dentistry, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.

Introduction: The purpose of this study was to investigate the fracture resistance of roots by using intraorifice barriers with glass fiber-incorporated ProRoot MTA and Biodentine.

Methods: The diametral tensile strength and compressive strength of ProRoot MTA and Biodentine were determined after incorporation of 5 wt% and 10 wt% alkali resistant (AR) glass fiber powder into both cements. On the basis of higher diametral tensile strength and compressive strength values, ProRoot MTA and Biodentine with 5 wt% AR glass fiber were selected for further testing as intraorifice barriers. The 14-mm-long root specimens obtained from extracted mandibular premolars (n = 60) were prepared with nickel-titanium rotary files and obturated with gutta-percha + AH Plus sealer. After removal of coronal 3 mm of root fillings, the roots were grouped with respect to the intraorifice barrier material (n = 12/group): (1) ProRoot MTA, (2) ProRoot MTA with 5 wt% AR glass fibers, (3) Biodentine, (4) Biodentine with 5 wt% AR glass fibers, and (5) control (no intraorifice barrier). The specimens were loaded vertically at 1 mm/min crosshead speed until vertical root fracture occurred. The data were evaluated statistically by using 2-way analysis of variance and Tukey tests.

Results: Both incorporation of glass fiber and the type of material significantly affected fracture resistance (both P = .002). Roots with glass fiber-reinforced Biodentine barriers showed the highest fracture strength (P = .000).

Conclusions: Incorporation of 5 wt% AR glass fiber can significantly improve the reinforcement effect of ProRoot MTA and Biodentine when used as intraorifice barriers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joen.2016.08.002DOI Listing
November 2016

Effect of timing of post space preparation on the apical seal when using different sealers and obturation techniques.

J Dent Sci 2016 Mar 11;11(1):79-82. Epub 2012 Jul 11.

Department of Prostodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.

Background/purpose: To prepare the post apace, some of the root-canal filling material has to be removed, which can affect the apical seal. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of immediate post space preparation to that of delayed post space preparation on apical sealing using three different endodontic sealers and obturation techniques.

Materials And Methods: In total, 90 decrowned single-rooted human teeth were studied. After root canals were prepared with 0.06 tapered nickel-titanium rotary files to size 30, the roots were categorized randomly into three experimental groups according to the obturation material: (1) AH plus/gutta-percha; (2) Sealite Ultra/gutta-percha; and (3) Epiphany/Resilon. Furthermore in all groups, specimens were categorized randomly into three subgroups according to the obturation technique ( = 10): (1) single cone; (2) cold lateral compaction; and (3) System B + Obtura. After root-canal filling, post space preparation was immediately performed in Group 1, after 24 hours in Group 2, and after 7 days in Group 3. Apical leakage was measured using the fluid-filtration method. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis test and Wilcoxon signed ranks test at P < 0.001.

Results: Regardless of the obturation technique and sealers used, significantly better (P < 0.001) sealing was achieved at the apical ends using delayed post space preparation than with immediate post preparation. The obturation techniques tested did not significantly affect leakage values. The following statistical ranking of fluid filtration values was obtained for the obturation materials: Epiphany/Resilon > Sealite Ultra/gutta-percha > AH plus/gutta-percha (P < 0.001).

Conclusion: To reduce apical leakage, clinicians should use AH plus together with any of the obturation techniques after 7 days of obturation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jds.2012.05.017DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6395178PMC
March 2016

Effect of endodontic chelating solutions on the bond strength of endodontic sealers.

Braz Oral Res 2015 ;29

Department of Biomaterials Science, Institute of Dentistry, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.

The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of various chelating solutions on the radicular push-out bond strength of calcium silicate-based and resin-based root canal sealers. Root canals of freshly-extracted single-rooted teeth (n = 80) were instrumented by using rotary instruments. The specimens were randomly divided into 4 groups according to the chelating solutions being tested: (1) 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA); (2) 9% etidronic acid; (3) 1% peracetic acid (PAA); and (4) distilled water (control). In each group, the roots were further assigned into 2 subgroups according to the sealer used: (1) an epoxy resin-based sealer (AH Plus) and (2) a calcium silicate-based sealer (iRoot SP). Four 1 mm-thick sections were obtained from the coronal aspect of each root (n = 40 slices/group). Push-out bond strength test was performed at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min., and the bond strength data were analyzed statistically with two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni's post hoc test (p < 0.05). Failure modes were assessed quantitatively under a stereomicroscope. Irrespective of the irrigation regimens, iRoot SP exhibited significantly higher push-out bond strength values than AH Plus (p < 0.05). For both the sealers, the use of chelating solutions increased the bond strength, but to levels that were not significantly greater than their respective controls (p > 0.05). iRoot SP showed higher resistance to dislocation than AH Plus. Final irrigation with 17% EDTA, 9% Etidronic acid, and 1% PAA did not improve the bond strength of AH Plus and iRoot SP to radicular dentin.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/1807-3107BOR-2015.vol29.0059DOI Listing
September 2015

A comparison of residual smear layer and erosion following different endodontic irrigation protocols tested under clinical and laboratory conditions.

Acta Odontol Scand 2013 Sep 28;71(5):1261-6. Epub 2013 Feb 28.

Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.

Objective: To compare the smear layer removal efficacy and erosive effects of different irrigation protocols under clinical and laboratory conditions.

Materials And Methods: Mandibular third molars (n = 32) of 30-45 year-old patients were instrumented with rotary files and were randomly assigned to one of the following groups for final irrigation: (1) 5.25% NaOCl; (2) 17% EDTA; and (3) BioPure MTAD. Thereafter, the teeth were immediately extracted and processed for micromorphological investigation. In vitro specimen pairs were prepared by repeating the clinical experiments on freshly-extracted mandibular third molars. To compare open and closed systems, laboratory experiments were repeated on 32 additional teeth with enlarged apical foramen. The cleanliness of the root canals and the extent of erosion were assessed by environmental scanning electron microscopy.

Results: Specimens prepared under clinical and laboratory conditions had similar cleanliness and erosion scores (p > 0.05). Under both conditions, the tested solutions were more effective in removing the smear layer in the coronal and middle regions than in the apical one. Comparison of closed and open systems showed similar levels of cleanliness and erosion in all regions (p > 0.05), with the exception of 17% EDTA showing significantly higher levels of cleanliness and erosion in the apical third of open-end specimens.

Conclusions: Based on clinical correlates of in vitro root canal cleanliness and erosion, laboratory testing of root canal irrigants on extracted teeth with closed apices can serve as a reliable method to simulate the clinical condition. EDTA was the most effective final irrigation solution in removing the smear layer at the expense of yielding the greatest erosive effect.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016357.2012.757647DOI Listing
September 2013

Effect of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid on root fracture with respect to concentration at different time exposures.

J Endod 2012 Aug 7;38(8):1110-3. Epub 2012 Jun 7.

Department of Endodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.

Introduction: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on root fracture with respect to various concentrations at different time exposures.

Methods: A total of 48 mandibular incisors were selected. Eight nonprepared roots were selected as a negative control. The remaining 40 specimens were instrumented with rotary files and randomly assigned to one of the following groups for final irrigation: (1) 10 mL distilled water for 10 minutes (positive control); (2) 10 mL of 17% EDTA for 1 minute + 10 mL of 1% NaOCl for 1 minute; (3) 10 mL of 5% EDTA for 1 minute + 10 mL of 1% NaOCl for 1 minute; (4) 10 mL of 17% EDTA for 10 minutes + 10 mL of 1% NaOCl for 1 minute; (5) 10 mL of 5% EDTA for 10 minutes + 10 mL of 1% NaOCl for 1 minute. Thereafter, the root canals were filled by using AH26 root canal sealer with a single-cone technique. The specimens were loaded vertically at 1 mm/min crosshead speed until vertical root fracture occurred. Results were evaluated statistically with 1-way analysis of variance and Student's t test.

Results: Statistically significant differences were detected among the groups (P < .05). The highest mean fracture resistance was obtained from the group treated with 5% EDTA for 10 minutes. This is about 2 times more than the weakest mean fracture resistance, which was obtained from the 17% EDTA-10 minute group.

Conclusions: The fracture resistances of endodontically treated roots were found to be differently affected by the various concentrations of EDTA at different time exposures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joen.2012.04.026DOI Listing
August 2012

Dentin moisture conditions affect the adhesion of root canal sealers.

J Endod 2012 Feb 13;38(2):240-4. Epub 2011 Nov 13.

Department of Endodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.

Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of intraradicular moisture conditions on the push-out bond strength of root canal sealers.

Methods: Eighty root canals were prepared using rotary instruments and, thereafter, were assigned to 4 groups with respect to the moisture condition tested: (1) ethanol (dry): excess distilled water was removed with paper points followed by dehydration with 95% ethanol, (2) paper points: the canals were blot dried with paper points with the last one appearing dry, (3) moist: the canals were dried with low vacuum by using a Luer adapter for 5 seconds followed by 1 paper point for 1 second, and (4) wet: the canals remained totally flooded. The roots were further divided into 4 subgroups according to the sealer used: (1) AH Plus (Dentsply-Tulsa Dental, Tulsa, OK), (2) iRoot SP (Innovative BioCeramix Inc, Vancouver, Canada), (3) MTA Fillapex (Angelus Indústria de Produtos Odontológicos S/A, Londrina, Brasil), and (4) Epiphany (Pentron Clinical Technologies, Wallingford, CT). Five 1-mm-thick slices were obtained from each root sample (n = 25 slices/group). Bond strengths of the test materials to root canal dentin were measured using a push-out test setup at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. The data were analyzed statistically by two-way analysis of variance and Tukey tests at P = .05.

Results: Irrespective of the moisture conditions, iRoot SP displayed the highest bond strength to root dentin. Statistical ranking of bond strength values was as follows: iRoot SP > AH Plus > Epiphany ≥ MTA Fillapex. The sealers displayed their highest and lowest bond strengths under moist (3) and wet (4) conditions, respectively.

Conclusions: The degree of residual moisture significantly affects the adhesion of root canal sealers to radicular dentin. For the tested sealers, it may be advantageous to leave canals slightly moist before filling.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joen.2011.09.027DOI Listing
February 2012

Debris and irrigant extrusion potential of 2 rotary systems and irrigation needles.

Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod 2011 Oct 20;112(4):e31-5. Epub 2011 Jul 20.

Department of Endodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Hacettepe University, Sıhhiye, Ankara, Turkey.

The purpose of this study was to compare the amount of apically extruded irrigant using 2 Ni-Ti rotary systems. Forty mandibular premolars with single canals were randomly assigned into 4 groups. Flower arrangement foam cubes were weighed with a precision balance before being attached to the apical portions of all teeth. In group 1, preparation was completed with ProTaper files. In group 2 canals were prepared with RaCe files. In groups 1 and 2, the irrigant was delivered with a 30-gauge conventional dental needle. In groups 3 and 4, teeth were prepared as in groups 1 and 2 with the exception that the irrigant was delivered with a side-vented irrigation needle. The weight of the extruded material (irrigant and debris) for each group was calculated by comparing the pre- and postinstrumentation weights of the foams used for periapical modeling. Obtained data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests, with P equals .05 as the level for statistical significance. ProTaper files used with regular needle irrigation had the highest fluid extrusion. The lowest irrigant extrusion was observed with the RaCe system combined with a side-vented irrigation needle. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that irrigation needle and rotary instruments have an effect on the amount of extruded root canal irrigant.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tripleo.2011.03.044DOI Listing
October 2011

Effect of different intraorifice barriers on the fracture resistance of roots obturated with Resilon or gutta-percha.

J Endod 2010 Jun 9;36(6):1061-3. Epub 2010 Apr 9.

Department of Endodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.

Introduction: This study investigated and compared the root reinforcement potential of 3 different intraorifice barriers (mineral trioxide aggregate [MTA], resin-modified glass ionomer cement [Vitremer], and fiber-reinforced composite [FRC]) placed over root canals obturated with gutta-percha or Resilon.

Methods: Crowns of 80 extracted human mandibular premolars were sectioned off to obtain 14-mm-long root specimens. After preparation of root canals with nickel-titanium rotary files, the roots were obturated with either the Resilon/Epiphany system or gutta-percha + AH Plus sealer. In both obturation groups, specimens were further subgrouped with respect to the intraorifice barrier material placed after removal of 3-mm coronal portion of the root fillings: (1) MTA, (2) Vitremer, and (3) FRC. The specimens were loaded vertically at 1 mm/min crosshead speed until vertical root fracture occurred. Results were evaluated statistically with two-way analysis of variance and Tukey tests.

Results: Fracture resistance of roots was significantly affected by the type of intraorifice barrier (P < .05), but not by the type of obturation system used (P > .05).

Conclusions: The use of Vitremer and FRC significantly improved the fracture resistance, whereas MTA did not exhibit any reinforcing effect as an intraorifice barrier.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joen.2010.03.006DOI Listing
June 2010

Surface porosity of hand-mixed, syringe-mixed and encapsulated set endodontic sealers.

Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod 2010 Jun;109(6):e117-22

Department of Endodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.

Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the surface porosity of hand-mixed, syringe-mixed and encapsulated set endodontic sealers using image analysis.

Study Design: Eight different root canal sealers (AD Seal/Meta Biomed; AH Plus/Dentsply; MM Seal/Micromega; AH Plus Jet/Dentsply; EndoREZ/Ultradent; Epiphany/Pentron; GuttaFlow/Coltène; RealSeal/Sybron Endo) were prepared in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations and dispensed into plastic rings (n = 10/group). Following set of the specimens, scanning electron photomicrographs of the sealer surfaces were taken at standard magnification. The area fraction and the minimum-maximum diameters of surface pores were calculated on the micrographs using ImageJ open-source image analysis software. Statistical comparisons were made between the sealers with respect to the area fractions and number of pores (Kruskal-Wallis test, P < .05).

Results: The endodontic sealers differed significantly in both the percentage of area fraction and pore count (P < .001). The surface porosity of the methacrylate-based sealers Epiphany and RealSeal were significantly lower than those of resin- and silicone-based sealers. With the exception of AD Seal, hand-mixed sealers displayed significantly higher surface porosity than those of syringe-mixed ones (P < .001). The encapsulated sealer GuttaFlow exhibited the highest surface area fraction of pores.

Conclusion: The mixing method influences the surface porosity of set endodontic sealers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tripleo.2010.02.014DOI Listing
June 2010

Effects of different irrigation regimens on the sealing properties of repaired furcal perforations.

Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod 2009 Mar 20;107(3):e91-5. Epub 2009 Jan 20.

Department of Endodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.

Objective: The pulp chamber is inevitably exposed to irrigants during endodontic therapy. This study aimed to investigate whether different irrigation regimens would alter the sealing ability of repaired furcal perforations.

Study Design: Pulp chambers of 90 extracted human molars were accessed, after which standardized diamond bur-cut perforations were created in the center of the pulp chamber floor. The canal orifices and the apical end of roots were sealed with acid-etch composite resin. Eighty teeth were randomly divided into 2 groups (n = 40/group) according to the material used for repairing the perforation defects: (1) Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), (2) Super-EBA. The remaining teeth (n = 10) served as controls. The specimens were further subgrouped according to the irrigation regimens applied over the repair site (n = 10/group): (a) 5.25% NaOCl, (b) 5.25% NaOCl + EDTA, (c) 5.25% NaOCl + MTAD, and (d) No irrigation. Coronal leakage was measured by the fluid-filtration method at 1 day and 1 week.

Results: Fluid conductance was not affected by the type of repair material (P = .964) or time (P = .726), but was affected significantly by the irrigation regimens in the following ranking: (P < .001): NaOCl < or = No Irrigation < NaOCl + MTAD < or = NaOCl + EDTA.

Conclusion: The sealing ability of furcal perforations repaired with MTA or Super-EBA were differentially affected by exposure to the tested irrigation regimens.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tripleo.2008.10.024DOI Listing
March 2009

Effects of different light-curing units and obturation techniques on the seal of the Resilon/Epiphany system.

J Endod 2008 Oct 23;34(10):1230-2. Epub 2008 Aug 23.

Department of Endodontics, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.

The purpose of this study was to compare the sealing ability of a resin- and polymer-based root canal obturation system (Resilon; Resilon Research LLC, Madison, CT/Epiphany; Clinical Technologies, Wallingford, CT) used in conjunction with different light-curing units and obturation techniques. A total of 120 decrowned single-rooted human teeth were used. After preparation of the root canals with 0.06 taper nickel-titanium rotary files to size 30, the roots were randomly assigned into three experimental groups according to the obturation technique used: (1) single cone, (2) cold lateral compaction, and (3) System B + Obtura. In all groups, the specimens were randomly assigned into four subgroups according to the polymerization method that was used to cure Epiphany sealer from the coronal aspect: (1) quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH), (2) light-emitting diode (LED), (3) plasma-arc curing (PAC), and (4) chemical cure (uncured). Leakage was measured by the fluid-filtration method at 1 day and 1 week. Statistical analysis was performed by using Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests at p < 0.001. Fluid conductance of all groups increased significantly within time (p < 0.001). The tested obturation techniques had no significant effect on the leakage values (p = 0.433). The following statistical ranking was obtained for fluid-filtration values: uncured > PAC > LED > QTH (p < 0.001).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joen.2008.07.011DOI Listing
October 2008

Comparative evaluation of three nickel-titanium instrumentation systems in human teeth using computed tomography.

J Endod 2006 Jul 6;32(7):668-71. Epub 2006 May 6.

Department of Endodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.

This study investigated several parameters of root canal preparation with three different rotary NiTi systems: Hero Shaper, ProTaper, and RaCe. The parameters evaluated were: changes in root canal volume and cross-sectional area, canal transportation, and working time. Curved, mesial molar roots were scanned in a computed tomography (CT) unit before and after instrumentation. Cross-sectional views of each canal were obtained at 1 mm intervals. Postinstrumentation volume and cross-sectional area of root canals and the extent of transportation were calculated using image analysis software and, thereafter, subjected to statistical analysis. ProTaper removed significantly more dentin than Hero Shaper (p < 0.05). Instrumentation increased the cross-sectional area at all cutplanes, while the difference between test groups was not significant (p > 0.05). RaCe files significantly transported the canals at the coronal level (p < 0.05). There was no difference between any rotary systems in regards to working time.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joen.2005.12.015DOI Listing
July 2006