Publications by authors named "Oyenike Oyeleye"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Attitudes Surrounding Music of Patients With Anorexia Nervosa: A Survey-Based Mixed-Methods Analysis.

Front Psychiatry 2021 2;12:639202. Epub 2021 Jun 2.

Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.

Anorexia nervosa (AN) is one of the main eating disorders. It has the highest mortality of all psychiatric disorders, and the success rates of current therapies are not fully satisfactory. Thus, there is a need for novel interventions. We investigated the attitudes surrounding music of 41 patients with clinically-diagnosed AN as well as their thoughts on the potential therapeutic uses of music using a questionnaire of 50 questions. Free text responses were qualitatively analyzed for reoccurring themes with NVivo 12 software. Yes/no questions and questions of best fit were analyzed using the IBM SPSS Statistics version 25. The most prevalent theme was the positive effect of music. Most patients reported that listening to music evokes varying emotions in them (83%) which may be of positive or negative nature. Similarly, patients associated certain music with particular positive, but also with particular negative memories. A majority of patients stated that music helps to distract them (85%), helps with loneliness (59%) and helps them feel more connected to others (58%). This data indicates that people with AN make nonclinical use of music which seems to elicit positive as well as negative emotions and memories. Patients felt music is beneficial with regard to important aspects of AN, such as emotional problems, loneliness, and relationship difficulties. Most of them would also like to attend music therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyt.2021.639202DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8206484PMC
June 2021

Optimising care pathways for adult anorexia nervosa. What is the evidence to guide the provision of high-quality, cost-effective services?

Eur Eat Disord Rev 2021 May 24;29(3):306-315. Epub 2021 Feb 24.

Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital of Bellvitge-IDIBELL and CIBERobn, Barcelona, Spain.

The aim of this paper is to consider how changes in service planning and delivery might improve the care pathways for adult anorexia nervosa. Although anorexia nervosa has a long history in Europe, its framing as a mental disorder is quite recent. The changing forms and increasing epidemiology of eating disorders has led to the expansion of specialised services. Although some services provide care over the entire clinical course, more often services are divided into those that care for children and adolescents or adults. The transition needs to be carefully managed as currently these services may have a different ethos and expectations. Services for adults have a broad range of diversity (diagnostic subtype, medical severity, comorbidity, stage of illness and psychosocial functioning) all of which impacts on prognosis. A tailored, approach to treatment planning could optimise the pathway. Facilitating early help seeking and rapid diagnosis in primary care and reducing specialised services waiting lists for assessment and treatment could be a form of secondary prevention. The use of precision models and /or continuous outcome monitoring might reduce the third of patients who require more intensive care by applying augmentation strategies. Finally, gains from intensive care might be sustained by relapse prevention interventions and community support to bridge the transition home. Together these measures might reduce the proportion of patients (currently a third) with ill health for over 20 years. For this group rehabilitation strategies may improve functioning until new treatment emerge.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/erv.2821DOI Listing
May 2021

The value of including families in the treatment of anorexia nervosa.

Eur Eat Disord Rev 2021 May 22;29(3):393-401. Epub 2020 Dec 22.

South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, Adult Inpatient Eating Disorders Service, Tyson West 2, Bethlem Royal Hospital, Beckenham, UK.

The aim of this paper is to consider family and wider carer involvement in the treatment of anorexia nervosa, and how this can be used to add value to services. We discuss widely adopted interventions involving the family that have been manualised and studied in trials that have outcome measures that are of relevance to illness costs. The therapeutic targets of these interventions range from a focus on feeding to the wellbeing of the whole family. The theoretical models that underpin interventions involving the family/wider carers include both intra and interpersonal processes, with the exception of family-based therapy, which in its original form holds an agnostic stance towards aetiology. Although formal evaluation of the cost effectiveness of these interventions is minimal, there is evidence that involving the family can reduce bed use and improve the wellbeing of both patients and family members. Moreover, for the most part, these interventions are acceptable to patients and carers. Finally, we consider how these approaches can be disseminated and scaled up more widely into services.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/erv.2816DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8246805PMC
May 2021

Measuring Clinical Efficacy Through the Lens of Audit Data in Different Adult Eating Disorder Treatment Programmes.

Front Psychiatry 2020 1;11:599945. Epub 2020 Dec 1.

Department of Psychological Medicine, King's College London, Institute of Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience, London, United Kingdom.

Audit data is important in creating a clear picture of clinical reality in clinical services, and evaluating treatment outcomes. This paper explored the data from an audit of a large national eating disorder (ED) service and evaluated the outcome of inpatient and day treatment programmes for patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) with and without autistic traits. Four hundred and seventy-six patients receiving treatment for AN at inpatient (IP), day-care (DC) and step-up (SU) programmes were assessed at admission and at discharge on the following measures: autistic traits, body-mass-index (BMI), ED symptoms, depression and anxiety symptoms, work and social functioning, and motivation for change. Outcomes were analyzed first at a within-group level based on change in mean scores and then at an individual level based on the clinical significance of improvement in eating disorder symptoms. Outcomes were compared between patients with high autistic traits (HAT) and low autistic traits (LAT) in each programme. The findings suggest that 45.5% of DC and 35.1% of IP patients showed clinically significant changes in ED symptoms following treatment. Co-occurring high autistic traits positively predicted improvement in ED symptoms in IP setting, but was a negative predictor in DC. In IP, more HAT inpatients no longer met the BMI cut-off for AN compared to LAT peers. In terms of general psychopathology, patients with AN and HAT exhibited more severe depression symptoms, anxiety symptoms and social functioning impairment than their LAT peers, and these symptoms stayed clinically severe after treatment. Patients with AN and hight autistic traits are more likely than their peers with low autistic traits to show weight restoration and improvement in ED systems after inpatient treatment. This reverses in DC, with high autistic trait patients less likely to improve after treatment compared to low autistic trait patients. Our results suggest that inpatient treatment with individualized and structured routine care may be an effective model of treatment for patients with AN and high autistic traits.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyt.2020.599945DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7736031PMC
December 2020
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