Professor Oyedunni Arulogun, PhD - University of Ibadan - Professor

Professor Oyedunni Arulogun

PhD

University of Ibadan

Professor

Ibadan, Oyo | Nigeria

Main Specialties: Public Health

Additional Specialties: Health Promotion and Education, Speech & Audiology, Reproductive Health, Tropical diseases, Non-Communicable Diseases

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-2173-4682

Professor Oyedunni Arulogun, PhD - University of Ibadan - Professor

Professor Oyedunni Arulogun

PhD

Publications

34Publications

938Reads

46Profile Views

209PubMed Central Citations

Gender differential in inclination to donate brain for research among Nigerians: the IBADAN Brain Bank Project.

Cell Tissue Bank 2019 Jun 26;20(2):297-306.

Cell Tissue Bank 2019 Jun 26;20(2):297-306. Epub 2019 Apr 26. June 2019 | 1.026 Impact Factor

Abstract

BACKGROUND: 

Laboratory-based studies of neurological disease patterns and mechanisms are sparse in sub-Saharan Africa. However, availability of human brain tissue resource depends on willingness towards brain donation. This study evaluated the level of willingness among outpatient clinic attendees in a Nigerian teaching hospital.

METHODS: 

Under the auspices of the IBADAN Brain Bank Project, a 43-item semi-structured interviewer-administered questionnaire was designed to evaluate knowledge, attitude, and beliefs of individuals attending Neurology, Psychiatry and Geriatrics Outpatient clinics regarding willingness to donate brain for research. Association between participants characteristics and willingness towards brain donation was investigated using logistic regression models. Analysis was conducted using Stata SE version 12.0.

RESULTS: 

A total of 412 participants were interviewed. Their mean age was 46.3 (16.1) years. 229 (55.6%) were females and 92.5% had at least 6 years of formal education. Overall, 109 (26.7%) were willing to donate brains for research. In analyses adjusting for educational status, religion, ethnicity, marital status and family setting, male sex showed independent association with willingness towards brain donation OR (95% CI) 1.7 (1.08-2.69), p = 0.023. Participants suggested public engagement and education through mass media (including social media) and involvement of religious and community leaders as important interventions to improve awareness and willingness towards brain donation.

CONCLUSION: 

The survey revealed low willingness among outpatient clinic attendees to donate brain for research, although men were more inclined to donate. It is imperative to institute public engagement and educational interventions in order to improve consent for brain donation for research.

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June 2019

Impact Factor 1.026

Echocardiographic Abnormalities and Determinants of 1-Month Outcome of Stroke Among West Africans in the SIREN Study.

J Am Heart Assoc 2019 Jun 30;8(11):e010814. Epub 2019 May 30

Journal American Heart Association

Abstract

Background Little is known about the relationship between echocardiographic abnormalities and outcome among patients with acute stroke. We investigated the pattern and association of baseline echocardiographic variables with 1-month disability and mortality among patients with stroke in the SIREN (Stroke Investigative Research and Education Network) study. Methods and Results We enrolled and followed up consecutive 1020 adult patients with acute stroke with baseline transthoracic echocardiography from west Africa. To explore the relationship between echocardiographic variables and 1-month disability (using modified Rankin scale >3) and fatality, regression models were fitted. Relative risks were computed with 95% CIs. The participants comprised 60% men with a mean age of 59.2±14.6 years. Ischemic stroke was associated with smaller aortic root diameter (30.2 versus 32.5, P=0.018) and septal (16.8 versus 19.1, P<0.001) and posterior wall thickness at systole (18.9 versus 21.5, P=0.004). Over 90% of patients with stroke had abnormal left ventricular (LV) geometry with eccentric hypertrophy predominating (56.1%). Of 13 candidate variables investigated, only baseline abnormal LV geometry (concentric hypertrophy) was weakly associated with 1-month disability (unadjusted relative risk, 1.80; 95% CI , 0.97-5.73). Severe LV systolic dysfunction was significantly associated with increased 1-month mortality (unadjusted relative risk, 3.05; 95% CI , 1.36-6.83). Conclusions Nine of 10 patients with acute stroke had abnormal LV geometry and a third had systolic dysfunction. Severe LV systolic dysfunction was significantly associated with 1 month mortality. Larger studies are required to establish the independent effect and unravel predictive accuracy of this association.

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June 2019

Impact Factor 2.882

Hypertension Knowledge and Willingness of Government Officials in a Southwestern Nigerian City to Self-Monitor Blood Pressure.

Int Q Community Health Educ 2019 Jun 19:272684X19857431. Epub 2019 Jun 19. June 2019

Int Q Community Health Educ 2019 Jun 19:272684X19857431. Epub 2019 Jun 19. June 2019

Abstract

Self-monitoring of blood pressure (BP) is indispensable for the prevention and management of hypertension. Attitude and willingness to self-monitor BP have not been well investigated in Nigeria. This study investigated hypertension knowledge, attitude, and willingness of government officials in a southwestern Nigerian city to self-monitor BP. The study was a descriptive cross-sectional survey and 280 respondents completed a pretested, semistructured questionnaire. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and χ2 test. Mean age was 35.7 ± 10.6 years, 57.5% were women and 72.1% had tertiary education. Majority (65.7%) had poor knowledge about hypertension, only 1.8% recognized its symptomless nature. Majority (77.9%) had positive attitude toward being trained to self-monitor BP, while 82.1% were willing to buy self-monitoring devices. Hypertension knowledge was associated with age and marital status (p < .05), while attitude was associated with willingness to self-monitor BP (p < .05). Population-wide, educational interventions should be intensified to improve hypertension knowledge and enhance skills to self-monitor BP.

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June 2019
41 Reads

The Use of Qualitative Methods in Developing Implementation Strategies in Prevention Research for Stroke Survivors in Nigeria.

J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich) 2016 10 1;18(10):1015-1021. Epub 2016 Apr 1.

Department of Neurosciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jch.12817DOI Listing
October 2016
50 Reads
1 Citation
2.960 Impact Factor

Multilingual Validation of the Questionnaire for Verifying Stroke-Free Status in West Africa.

Stroke 2016 Jan 17;47(1):167-72. Epub 2015 Nov 17.

From the Department of Medicine, Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana (F.S., S.A., V.O., N.B.-A., L.A.); Department of Neurology, Medical University of South Carolina, (M.G., B.O., K.A., R.S., C.J., D.L.); Department of Medicine, Federal Medical Centre, Abeokuta, Nigeria (R.A.); Department of Medicine, Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Nigeria (L.O., S.I., N.T., A.M., A.D., N.I.); Department of Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria (R.O., E.T.-A., I.P., A.S., P.A.); Department of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria (O. Akpa, O. Arulogun, A. Adeoye, A.T., O. Adeleye, A. Agunloye, G.O., J.A., S.M., E.U., G.A., S.K., M.O.); Department of Medicine, University of Ghana Medical School, Accra, Ghana (A. Akpalu, Y.M., R.L.); and Department of Biostatistics, University of Alabama at Birmingham (D.A., H.T.).

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/STROKEAHA.115.010374DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4696900PMC
January 2016
64 Reads
8 Citations
5.723 Impact Factor

Pretesting Qualitative Data Collection Procedures to Facilitate Methodological Adherence and Team Building in Nigeria.

Int J Qual Methods 2015;14:53-64

Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, USA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4393011PMC
January 2015
9 Reads
1 Citation

Randomized controlled trial of a multipronged intervention to improve blood pressure control among stroke survivors in Nigeria.

Int J Stroke 2014 Dec 18;9(8):1109-16. Epub 2014 Jul 18.

Department of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ijs.12331DOI Listing
December 2014
33 Reads
11 Citations
3.833 Impact Factor

Research capacity. Enabling the genomic revolution in Africa.

Authors:
Charles Rotimi Akin Abayomi Alash'le Abimiku Victoria May Adabayeri Clement Adebamowo Ezekiel Adebiyi Adebowale D Ademola Adebowale Adeyemo Dwomoa Adu Dissou Affolabi Godfred Agongo Samuel Ajayi Sally Akarolo-Anthony Rufus Akinyemi Albert Akpalu Marianne Alberts Orlando Alonso Betancourt Ahmed Mansour Alzohairy Gobena Ameni Olukemi Amodu Gabriel Anabwani Kristian Andersen Fatiu Arogundade Oyedunni Arulogun Danny Asogun Rasheed Bakare Naby Balde Mary Lynn Baniecki Christine Beiswanger Alia Benkahla Lara Bethke Micheal Boehnke Vincent Boima James Brandful Andrew I Brooks Frank C Brosius Chester Brown Bruno Bucheton David T Burke Barrington G Burnett Stacy Carrington-Lawrence Nadia Carstens John Chisi Alan Christoffels Richard Cooper Heather Cordell Nigel Crowther Talishiea Croxton Jantina de Vries Leslie Derr Peter Donkor Seydou Doumbia Audrey Duncanson Ivy Ekem Ahmed El Sayed Mark E Engel John C K Enyaru Dean Everett Faisal M Fadlelmola Eyitayo Fakunle Kenneth H Fischbeck Anne Fischer Onikepe Folarin Junaid Gamieldien Robert F Garry Simani Gaseitsiwe Rasheed Gbadegesin Anita Ghansah Maria Giovanni Parham Goesbeck F Xavier Gomez-Olive Donald S Grant Ravnit Grewal Mark Guyer Neil A Hanchard Christian T Happi Scott Hazelhurst Branwen J Hennig Christiane Hertz- Fowler Winston Hide Friedhelm Hilderbrandt Christopher Hugo-Hamman Muntaser E Ibrahim Regina James Yasmina Jaufeerally-Fakim Carolyn Jenkins Ute Jentsch Pan-Pan Jiang Moses Joloba Victor Jongeneel Fourie Joubert Mukthar Kader Kathleen Kahn Pontiano Kaleebu Saidi H Kapiga Samar Kamal Kassim Ishmael Kasvosve Jonathan Kayondo Bernard Keavney Adeodata Kekitiinwa Sheik Humarr Khan Paul Kimmel Mary-Claire King Robert Kleta Mathurin Koffi Jeffrey Kopp Matthias Kretzler Judit Kumuthini Samuel Kyobe Catherine Kyobutungi Daniel T Lackland Karen A Lacourciere Guida Landouré Rita Lawlor Thomas Lehner Maia Lesosky Naomi Levitt Katherine Littler Zane Lombard Jeanne F Loring Sylvester Lyantagaye Annette Macleod Ebony B Madden Chengetai R Mahomva Julie Makani Manmak Mamven Marape Marape Graeme Mardon Patricia Marshall Darren P Martin Daniel Masiga Robin Mason Michael Mate-Kole Enock Matovu Mary Mayige Bongani M Mayosi Jean Claude Mbanya Sheryl A McCurdy Mark I McCarthy Helen McIlleron S O Mc'Ligeyo Corrine Merle Ana Olga Mocumbi Charles Mondo John V Moran Ayesha Motala Marva Moxey-Mims Wata Sununguko Mpoloka Chisomo L Msefula Thuli Mthiyane Nicola Mulder Gebregziab her Mulugeta Dieuodonne Mumba John Musuku Mo Nagdee Oyekanmi Nash Daouda Ndiaye Anh Quynh Nguyen Mark Nicol Oathokwa Nkomazana Shane Norris Betty Nsangi Alexander Nyarko Moffat Nyirenda Eileen Obe Reginald Obiakor Abraham Oduro Solomon F Ofori-Acquah Okechukwu Ogah Stephen Ogendo Kwaku Ohene-Frempong Akinlolu Ojo Timothy Olanrewaju John Oli Charlotte Osafo Odile Ouwe Missi Oukem-Boyer Bruce Ovbiagele Andrew Owen Mayowa Ojo Owolabi Lukman Owolabi Ellis Owusu-Dabo Guillaume Pare Rulan Parekh Hugh G Patterton Margaret B Penno Jane Peterson Rembert Pieper Jacob Plange-Rhule Martin Pollak Julia Puzak Rajkumar S Ramesar Michele Ramsay Rebekah Rasooly Shiksha Reddy Pardis C Sabeti Kwamena Sagoe Tunde Salako Oumar Samassékou Manjinder S Sandhu Osman Sankoh Fred Stephen Sarfo Marie Sarr Gasnat Shaboodien Issa Sidibe Gustave Simo Martin Simuunza Liam Smeeth Eugene Sobngwi Himla Soodyall Hermann Sorgho Oumou Sow Bah Sudha Srinivasan Dan J Stein Ezra S Susser Carmen Swanepoel Godfred Tangwa Andrew Tareila Ozlem Tastan Bishop Bamidele Tayo Nicki Tiffin Halidou Tinto Ekaete Tobin Stephen Meir Tollman Mahamadou Traoré Marsha J Treadwell Jennifer Troyer Masego Tsimako-Johnstone Vincent Tukei Ifeoma Ulasi Nzovu Ulenga Beverley van Rooyen Ablo Prudence Wachinou Salina P Waddy Alisha Wade Misaki Wayengera James Whitworth Louise Wideroff Cheryl A Winkler Sarah Winnicki Ambroise Wonkam Mengistu Yewondwos Tadase sen Nathan Yozwiak Heather Zar

Science 2014 Jun;344(6190):1346-8

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1251546DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4138491PMC
June 2014
211 Reads
89 Citations
31.480 Impact Factor

Tailored Hospital-based Risk Reduction to Impede Vascular Events After Stroke (THRIVES) study: qualitative phase protocol.

Crit Pathw Cardiol 2014 Mar;13(1):29-35

From the *Department of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria; †Department of Medicine, Federal Medical Center, Abeokuta, Nigeria; ‡Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of California, San Diego, CA; §Department of Health Promotion and Education, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria; ¶Department of Economics, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria; ‖Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC; and **Department of Neurosciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HPC.0000000000000005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4134882PMC
March 2014
15 Reads
6 Citations

Patterns and correlates of condom use among unmarried male youths in Nigeria: NDHS 2008.

Afr J Reprod Health 2013 Sep;17(3):149-59

Department of Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Faculty of Public Health, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.

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September 2013
10 Reads
3 Citations

Risky behaviours of undergraduate students of Ignatius Ajuru University of Education, Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria during Christmas period

4(7): 561-568

Educational Research

Festive periods Christmas inclusive, is a time for fun, socializing and partying with its attendant risky behaviours that predispose young people to infections and unintended pregnancies. This phenomenon has not been fully explored in Nigeria. This study therefore explored the risky behaviours of undergraduate students of the Ignatius Ajuru University of Education, Port Harcourt, Rivers State Nigeria during the Christmas period. A descriptive cross-sectional design was employed among 600 students selected from 5 faculties of the University using a stratified random sampling technique. Data was collected by a pretested semi-structured questionnaire. Analysis of data was done using descriptive statistics. More respondents were (52.5%) females, 33.8% were in the science faculty and 50.6% were within the 20-24 year age group. More than half (59.7%) had ever taken alcohol and 14.5% had ever smoked. About 46% of respondents keep friends that take alcohol, 23.8% keep friends that smoke cigarette, 42.9% had ever attended night party with friends and 39.4% attended night parties with friends during the Christmas preceding the study: 75.7% reportedly had sexual intercourse during the Christmas period and 32.2% of these did not use any form of protection. Young people exhibit risky sexual behaviour during the Christmas period. Sensitization and educational programmes targeting risky sexual practices among young people during festive periods should be instituted.

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July 2013
8 Reads

Why actions for early treatment of febrile illnesses in children are delayed by caregivers.

Int Q Community Health Educ 2011-2012;32(3):219-31

University of Ibadan, Nigeria.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2190/IQ.32.3.eDOI Listing
April 2013
11 Reads
2 Citations

Experiences of girls with hearing impairment in accessing reproductive health care services in Ibadan, Nigeria.

Afr J Reprod Health 2013 Mar;17(1):85-93

Department of Health Promotion and Education, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.

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March 2013
11 Reads
1 Citation

Perception of Risk Of Contracting HIV from Spouses Among Married Women In A Peri-Urban Community of South West Nigeria

8(6): 60-66

IOSR Journal of Humanities and Social Science

Perception of risk of contracting HIV from spouses was assessed among 390 married women selected from workplaces and households in Omi-Adio, a peri-urban Nigerian community. A pre-tested questionnaire containing a 14-point knowledge scale and focus group discussion guide were used to collect data. Quantitative data was analyzed using descriptive statistics, chi-square and ANOVA while the qualitative data analysis was by themes. Mean age of respondents was 30.2±2.9 years, 67.2% were in monogamous unions. Mean knowledge score was 7.3±2.9 and was significantly influenced by age and level of education (p<0.05). Unprotected sex was perceived as the major route of infection (96.9%), 95.0% believed that women could get HIV from their spouses and 10.0% of these perceived themselves to be at personal risk. Perceived risk factors for HIV infection from spouses included polygyny (77.2%) and infidelity (51.5%). Main preventive measures identified were mutual faithfulness (82.0%), use of condom (8.5%) and traditional methods (6.7%). FGD respondents proffered satisfying one’s spouse sexually so he doesn’t indulge in extra-marital affairs and providing one’s spouse with condoms as strategies for preventing HIV infection. Culturally sensitive health promotion programmes targeting couples aimed at increasing knowledge and uptake of effective preventive measures to reduce women’s vulnerability are advocated.

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March 2013
20 Reads

Perception and utilization of cervical cancer screening services among female nurses in University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.

Pan Afr Med J 2012 15;11:69. Epub 2012 Apr 15.

Department of Health Promotion and Education, Faculty of Public Health, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3361207PMC
August 2012
41 Reads
2 Citations

Perception of Self Vulnerability to HIV Infection among Long Distance Truck Drivers in Ibadan, Nigeria

1(10): 1380-1385

Journal of Basic Applied Science and Research

Two hundred and thirty-three truck drivers, in transit from Lagos to destinations within northern Nigeria were interviewed on their knowledge of HIV/AIDS, perception of susceptibility and condom use using a pre-tested questionnaire. The mean age of respondents was 31.9 + 8.9 years and nearly all of them (94.4%) had heard of AIDS through mass media and friends. Only 20.9% correctly knew the routes of transmission of HIV and 35.2% reportedly had at least one female sexual partner outside the home and 65.9% of these were food sellers. Even though the majority was aware of the sexual transmission route, only 26.2% had ever used a condom. Reasons given for not using condoms included reduction in sexual pleasure (42.5%) and condom being a barrier between them and their partners (40.7%). Perception of self vulnerability to HIV infection was low as 63.6% believed that they cannot contract HIV infection. There is need to intensify educational strategies among this group which will incorporate other at risk groups like food sellers, petrol attendants, petty traders and hawkers at the parks and stop over points

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October 2011
10 Reads

Fast Food Consumption Pattern among Undergraduates of the University of Ibadan, Nigeria: Implications for Nutrition Education

1(6): 89-93

Journal of Agriculture, Food and Technology

Consumption of fast foods has gradually become a common lifestyle in Nigeria especially in urban areas and among young people in spite of the associated adverse health consequences. University undergraduates’ pattern of consumption of fast foods and their perception of this practice as a risk factor for Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) have not been fully explored. This study was designed to assess fast food consumption pattern and the perception of it as a risk factor for NCDs among undergraduates of University of Ibadan. Four hundred undergraduate students recruited using a three-stage sampling technique from halls of residences participated in the survey. Data was collected through a pretested self administered questionnaire and analyzed using descriptive statistics and Chi-square test. The mean age of respondents was 22.0 ± 3.3 years, 57.3% were males, 98.5% singles and 85.4% of their parents were employed. Majority (99.5%) were aware of fast foods and 54.6% perceived them to be meals with minimal processing time. Perception of time when fast foods could be taken was at breakfast (69.5%); lunch (69.5%) and dinner (69.5%). Main types of fast food consumed were flour-based products only (81.1%) and flour-based products together with carbonated drinks (17.7%). Frequency of consumption included once in a week (19.1%), twice a week (15.6%), thrice a week (10.3%) and everyday (8.0%). Only 6.5% of respondents preferred fast foods to homemade meals and reasons for preference included being readily available and stress free (66.6%) and being more delicious and nutritious (19.1%). Fast food consumption was significantly higher among males and those whose parents were employed (p<0.05). 55.0% had no idea of how fast food consumption can be a risk factor for developing NCDs. Educational campaigns and behavioural change communication on healthy nutrition and lifestyles among young people are hereby advocated.

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June 2011
25 Reads

Experiences of Violence among Pregnant Women Attending Ante-Natal Clinics in Selected Hospitals in Abuja, Nigeria

3(1): 43-48

Sierra Leone Journal of Biomedical Research

Anecdotal records have shown that there is increasing prevalence of gender based violence in Nigeria. Little is known about the extent and magnitude of this phenomenon as it affects pregnant women. This study described the experiences of violence among pregnant women attending ante-natal clinics in Abuja, Nigeria using a cross-sectional design. A three-stage sampling technique was used to select 300 participants from six hospitals in the three out of the six Local Government Areas in the region. Data was collected using a pretested semi-structured questionnaire and analysed using descriptive statistics and chi-square tests. Forty three percent of the respondents had experienced at least one form of violence and 15.0% were experiencing violence in their current relationships. Main forms of violence ever experienced were psychological (38.0%) and physical (36.4%). Partners/husbands (70.2%) and partner/husband relatives (29.8) were the perpetrators. Of the partner/husband’s relatives, sisters-in-law (57.1%) and partners’ cousins (21.5%) were the main perpetrators of the forms of violence experienced. Strategies employed to resolve violence conflict included dialogue with spouse (46.7%), ignoring the experience (30.3%), making up with sex (16.7%), providing gifts and special dishes (5.0%) and mediation by family members (1.3%). Health promotion and education intervention strategies such as counselling, male involvement in sexual and reproductive health programs, advocacy for the promotion of women’s health and right as well as use of appropriate culturally sensitive conflict resolution strategies are needed to ameliorate the situation.

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April 2011
14 Reads

Attitude towards mandatory pre-marital HIV testing among unmarried youths in Ibadan northwest local government area, Nigeria.

Afr J Reprod Health 2010 Mar;14(1):83-94

Department of Health Promotion and Education, Faculty of Public Health, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.

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March 2010
20 Reads
3 Citations

Potential risk of HIV transmission in barbering practice among professional barbers in Ibadan, Nigeria.

Afr Health Sci 2009 Mar;9(1):19-25

Department of Health Promotion and Education, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.

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https://tspace.library.utoronto.ca/bitstream/1807/50768/1/hs
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http://pubmedcentralcanada.ca/pmcc/articles/PMC3491044/pdf/1
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2932524PMC
March 2009
12 Reads
5 Citations
0.662 Impact Factor

Acceptability of child adoption as management option for infertility in Nigeria: evidence from focus group discussions.

Afr J Reprod Health 2009 Mar;13(1):79-91

Departments of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, College of Medicine/University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.

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http://www.ajrh.info/vol13_no1/13_1_article_06.pdf
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March 2009
24 Reads
5 Citations

Knowledge dissemination and evaluation in a cervical cancer screening implementation program in Nigeria.

Gynecol Oncol 2007 Oct 21;107(1 Suppl 1):S196-207. Epub 2007 Sep 21.

Department of Gynecologic Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ygyno.2007.07.014DOI Listing
October 2007
13 Reads
4 Citations
3.774 Impact Factor

Community gate keepers' awareness and perception of prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV services in Ibadan, Nigeria.

Afr J Reprod Health 2007 Apr;11(1):67-75

Department of Health Promotion and Education, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan.

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April 2007
9 Reads
3 Citations

Top co-authors

Bruce Ovbiagele
Bruce Ovbiagele

Medical University of South Carolina

14
Ezinne Uvere
Ezinne Uvere

University of Ibadan

8
Albert Akpalu
Albert Akpalu

University of Ghana

8
Rufus O Akinyemi
Rufus O Akinyemi

Institute for Advanced Medical Research and Training

7
Mulugeta Gebregziabher
Mulugeta Gebregziabher

Medical University of South Carolina

7
Rufus Akinyemi
Rufus Akinyemi

University of Ibadan

7
Reginald Obiako
Reginald Obiako

Ahmadu Bello University

7
Mayowa O Owolabi
Mayowa O Owolabi

University of Ibadan

7
Lukman Owolabi
Lukman Owolabi

Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital

7
Carolyn Jenkins
Carolyn Jenkins

Medical University of South Carolina

7

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