Publications by authors named "Outi Simola"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Intracranial biodegradable silica-based nimodipine drug release implant for treating vasospasm in subarachnoid hemorrhage in an experimental healthy pig and dog model.

Biomed Res Int 2015 22;2015:715752. Epub 2015 Jan 22.

Clinical Neurosciences, Department of Neurosurgery, Turku University Hospital, P.O. Box 52, Hämeentie 11, 20521 Turku, Finland.

Nimodipine is a widely used medication for treating delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after subarachnoid hemorrhage. When administrated orally or intravenously, systemic hypotension is an undesirable side effect. Intracranial subarachnoid delivery of nimodipine during aneurysm clipping may be more efficient way of preventing vasospasm and DCI due to higher concentration of nimodipine in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The risk of systemic hypotension may also be decreased with intracranial delivery. We used animal models to evaluate the feasibility of surgically implanting a silica-based nimodipine releasing implant into the subarachnoid space through a frontotemporal craniotomy. Concentrations of released nimodipine were measured from plasma samples and CSF samples. Implant degradation was followed using CT imaging. After completing the recovery period, full histological examination was performed on the brain and meninges. The in vitro characteristics of the implant were determined. Our results show that the biodegradable silica-based implant can be used for an intracranial drug delivery system and no major histopathological foreign body reactions were observed. CT imaging is a feasible method for determining the degradation of silica implants in vivo. The sustained release profiles of nimodipine in CSF were achieved. Compared to a traditional treatment, higher nimodipine CSF/plasma ratios can be obtained with the implant.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/715752DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4317635PMC
November 2015

Feline toxoplasmosis in Finland: cross-sectional epidemiological study and case series study.

J Vet Diagn Invest 2012 Nov 25;24(6):1115-24. Epub 2012 Sep 25.

Department of Veterinary Biosciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.

Three subgroups of the Finnish cat population underwent investigation for different aspects of feline toxoplasmosis. Blood samples of 445 purebred pet cats and 45 shelter cats were screened for Toxoplasma gondii-specific immunoglobulin G antibodies with a direct agglutination test. The overall seroprevalence was 48.4%; older cats and cats receiving raw meat in their diet were more often seropositive. Fecal samples were obtained from 131 shelters cats; 2 of the cats were found shedding T. gondii-like oocysts, and the oocysts shed by 1 of the 2 were confirmed as T. gondii with polymerase chain reaction. Among 193 cats submitted for necropsy during a 3.5-year period, 6 (3.1%) had been diagnosed with generalized toxoplasmosis and were retrospectively further investigated. The main pathological lesions included acute interstitial pneumonia, acute necrotizing hepatitis, and nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis with glial granulomas. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated a mild to massive parasite burden in tissues with pathological lesions as well as in unaffected tissues. The results of the direct multilocus genotyping of T. gondii parasites detected were consistent with endemic genotype II, and the causative parasite strains were isolated from 2 of the generalized toxoplasmosis cases. The results indicate that cats in Finland commonly encounter T. gondii and contribute to the environmental oocyst burden, while the endemic genotype II can also prove fatal to the parasite's definitive host. Preventing feline T. gondii infections is not only of public health importance but also a welfare issue for the cats themselves.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1040638712461787DOI Listing
November 2012

Congestive heart failure and atrial fibrillation in a cat with myocardial fibro-fatty infiltration.

J Feline Med Surg 2011 Feb 3;13(2):109-11. Epub 2010 Dec 3.

Department of Equine and Small Animal Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland.

Congestive heart failure and atrial fibrillation were diagnosed in a 4-year-old castrated Birman cat with progressive signs of dyspnea, tachypnea, and lethargy. Echocardiography revealed massive right-sided heart dilatation with ascites and hydrothorax. Electrocardiogram recording showed atrial fibrillation. Medical therapy with diuretics, benazepril, and antithrombotic agents was unsuccessful. The owner requested euthanasia. In post-mortem examination, changes associated with myocardial fibro-fatty infiltration were confirmed. Changes were most marked in the right ventricular wall but with left ventricular involvement was detected.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfms.2010.08.001DOI Listing
February 2011