Publications by authors named "Oumarou Amadou"

5 Publications

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Peoples' attitude toward COVID-19 vaccine, acceptance, and social trust among African and Middle East countries.

Health Promot Perspect 2021 19;11(2):171-178. Epub 2021 May 19.

Drug Applied Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.

To end the COVID-19 pandemic, a large part of the world must be immune to the virus by vaccination. Therefore, this study aimed to gauge intent to be vaccinated against COVID-19 among ordinary people and to identify attitudes towards vaccines and barriers for vaccine acceptance. The study population comprises 1880 people residing in different countries that answer a prepared questionnaire. The questionnaire topics are demographics, historical issues, participants' attitudes and beliefs regarding vaccines, concerns, and vaccine hesitancy. Attitudes and beliefs relating to vaccines in general, and the COVID-19 vaccine, were ascertained. Overall, 66.81% of the contributors would like to be vaccinated against COVID-19, while %33.19 did not intend to be vaccinated. Reasons for COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy included concern regarding vaccine side effects, fear of getting sick from the uptake of the vaccine, and the absence of accurate vaccine promotion news. Individuals with higher education believe that India (68.6%) produces the best vaccine ( <0.001), while healthcare workers think the Chinese vaccine (44.2%) is the best ( =0.020). Individuals with higher education have not been vaccinated, not be healthcare workers, and females were the most contributors to effective of the vaccine in reducing mortality from COVID-19 disease. Given the degree of hesitancy against COVID-19 vaccination, a multifaceted approach to facilitate vaccine uptake that includes vaccine education, behavioral change strategies, and health promotion, is paramount.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.34172/hpp.2021.21DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8233680PMC
May 2021

Fighting COVID-19 in the West Africa after experiencing the Ebola epidemic.

Health Promot Perspect 2021 7;11(1):5-11. Epub 2021 Feb 7.

Drug Applied Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) dissemination occurred from December 2019 and quickly spread to all countries. Infected patients with COVID-19 have had a wide range of symptoms, ranging from mild to severe illness. The most mortality was observed in patients with underlying disease and over 45 years. World statistics have shown that the COVID-19 outbreak is most expanded in Middle Eastern, West Asian, European, North, and South American countries, and is least expanded in African countries. Therefore, the aim of the paper was the evaluation of six African countries including Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Guinea, Togo, and Djibouti to find why this disease is least expanded in African countries. Study was conducted by Questioner for countries health organizers to define their different aspect exposure and fight with COVID-19 including epidemiology, clinical aspects of the disease, case definitions, diagnosis laboratory confirmation, and referral of cases by the portal of entry, case management, and disease prevention in these countries. According to this opinion review, due to the low international flights and low domestic travel, the spread, and prevalence of COVID-19 was low and the return of the immigrants of these countries has caused the spread of COVID-19 among these countries. Experience, preparation, and impact of previous infections epidemic such as the Ebola virus epidemic would have beneficial, which have promoted certain reflexes among people that cause low dissemination in these countries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.34172/hpp.2021.02DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7967127PMC
February 2021

[Epidemiological, clinical and evolutionary profile of patients with tuberculosis at the Regional Hospital of Maradi, Republic of the Niger].

Pan Afr Med J 2019 17;33:120. Epub 2019 Jun 17.

Service de Médecine Interne, Hôpital Général de Référence Niamey, Faculté des Sciences de la Santé de l'UAM de Niamey, Niamey, Niger.

Introduction: This study aimed to describe the epidemiological, clinical and evolutionary profile of patients treated for tuberculosis at the Regional Hospital of Maradi.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective, descriptive and analytical study of data from the medical records of patients treated for tuberculosis from 1 January 2015 to 31 December 2017.

Results: A total of 595 patients were followed (406 men, 68.24%, and 189 women, 31.76%) with a prevalence of 27,71%. The average age of patients was 42.3 ranging from 13 months to 85 years; 70.5% of these patients were from urban areas. Merchants represented 36.9% of the cases. Bacterial test was positive in 64.7% of cases. Functional signs included: coughing (99.5%), fever (79.5%), and chest pain. Pulmonary tuberculosis represented 78.7% of cases. Therapy was effective in 81.28% of cases. HIV prevalence was 13.6%, lethality 10.42% (40.4% of patients died from TB/HIV co-infection).

Conclusion: Tuberculosis is a scourge in low-income countries, with 10.42% of deaths. HIV/AIDS infection has negatively contributed to these deaths during the study period. The search for comorbidities in any patient with tuberculosis should be systematic in order to improve their global management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11604/pamj.2019.33.120.17715DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6711699PMC
September 2019

[Epidemiological and bacteriological features of surgical site infections (ISO) in the Division of Surgery at the Niamey National Hospital (HNN)].

Pan Afr Med J 2018 14;31:33. Epub 2018 Sep 14.

Faculté de Sciences de la Santé, Laboratoire de Bactériologie Virologie, Université Abdou Moumouni de Niamey, Niger.

This study aims to evaluate the epidemiological and bacteriological features of bacterial strains isolated from surgical site infections (ISO) at the Niamey National Hospital. We conducted a retrospective, descriptive study over a period of 24 months. All strains isolated from bacteriological samplings from patients with a surgical site infection have been identified and tested for antibiotic sensitivity according to conventional methods. The bacteriological analysis allowed the isolation of 126 bacterial strains with a predominance of S.aureus (n=39, 31%) followed by Escherichia coli (n=29, 23%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=12, 9.5%). The strains of Escherichia coli were 100% sensitive to imipenem. They showed marked ampicillin, amoxicillin, clavulanic acid and ticarcillin resistance. They had variable resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics (62% to gentamycin, and 78% to amikacin) and to fluoroquinolones (nalidixic acid 74%, pefloxacine 33%, ofloxacin 69%, ciprofloxacin 61%). All enterobacterial isolates were sensitive to imipenem. The strains of S.aureus showed resistance to penicillin G (88.6%) and oxacillin (83%). They also showed resistance to vancomycin and teicoplanin (37% and 57% respectively). By contrast, they were sensitive to lincomycin and aminoglycoside antibiotics tested. In the light of these results, we believe that it will be necessary to improve prophylaxis protocol and probabilistic antibiotic therapy in the Surgical Division and to conduct periodic surveillance studies of the ISO.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11604/pamj.2018.31.33.15921DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6430836PMC
April 2019

Risk factors for in-hospital maternal mortality in the region of Maradi, Niger (2008-2010: A retrospective study of 7 regional maternity units.

Med Sante Trop 2018 Feb;28(1):86-91

Université Dan Dicko Dan koulodo de Maradi.

In the Maradi region, despite multiple efforts to reduce maternal mortality the in-hospital maternal mortality ratio (HMMR) remains high. We sought to determine the factors related to maternal mortality in seven maternity units in this region. A retrospective study reviewed records of deliveries from January, 2008, through December, 2010. Data for all maternal deaths were collected. The Chi test was used to determine the significance of differences between groups for the different variables. Statistical significance was defined as P < 0.05. Data were analyzed with Epi Info© 3.5.1. The in-hospital maternal mortality ratio (HMMR) was 2,512 per 100,000 live births. Women aged 14 to 19 years were most affected, accounting for 27.1 % of deaths. In all, 93 (27.4 %) women died during their pregnancy. Direct obstetric causes accounted for 53.61 % of these deaths, and indirect causes 46.39 %. The bivariate analysis showed that age 14 to19 years (Chi = 64.69; P = 0.00000178); great multiparity (Chi = 64.69; P = 0.00000124), primiparity (Chi = 18.82; P = 0.000016), the third trimester of pregnancy (Chi = 10.43; P = 0.0054) were significantly associated with maternal death. It is therefore necessary to strengthen women's awareness about the risks of early pregnancy and the immediate use of health services.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1684/mst.2018.0770DOI Listing
February 2018
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