Publications by authors named "Osman Nuri Türkmenoglu"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Computerized Tomography-Guided Stereotactic Biopsy of Intracranial Lesions: Report of 500 Consecutive Cases.

Turk Neurosurg 2017 ;27(3):395-400

Sisli Hamidiye Etfal Research and Training Hospital, Clinic of Neurosurgery, Istanbul, Turkey.

Aim: Computed tomography (CT)-guided stereotactic brain biopsy has been performed in our clinic since March 1998. In this prospective study, we examined the patient data undergoing stereotactic biopsy and the results of biopsies in 500 consecutive patients.

Material And Methods: Between the dates of March 1998 and January 2015, CT-guided stereotactic biopsies were performed by using the Leksell stereotactic frame system (Elekta Instruments EU, Sweden) in 500 patients. A total of 512 procedures were performed in patients consisting of 184 females (36.8%) and 316 males (63.2%), ages ranging from 3 to 81 years (mean 50.40±16.67).

Results: Conclusive histopathological diagnosis was not achieved in 17(3.3%) of 512 procedures. Of the others, 173 (33.8%) were high-grade gliomas, 103 (20.1%) were low-grade gliomas, 36 (7%) were malignant lymphomas, 34 (6.6%) were other types of brain tumors, 82 (16%) were metastasis and 67 (13.1%) were non-tumoral lesions. Complications were occurred in ten cases: 3 tumoral bleedings, 2 hypertensive cerebral hematomas, 2 peroperative convulsions, 1 epidural hematoma, 1 myocardial infarction and 1 brain edema. The patients who developed myocardial infarction and hypertensive thalamic hematoma died. The mortality was 0.4% and morbidity was 1.6% in 512 procedures.

Conclusion: CT-guided stereotactic biopsy is a reliable and a safe procedure in cases with intracranial lesions when histopathological diagnosis is required for the appropriate treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5137/1019-5149.JTN.16280-15.1DOI Listing
December 2017

Changes in number of water-filled vesicles of choroid plexus in early and late phase of experimental rabbit subarachnoid hemorrhage model: the role of petrous ganglion of glossopharyngeal nerve.

Acta Neurochir (Wien) 2014 Jul 22;156(7):1311-7. Epub 2014 Apr 22.

Medical Faculty, Department of Neurosurgery, Ataturk University, Erzurum, Turkey.

Background: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) secretion may be increased in the early phases of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), possibly via ischemic glossopharyngeal nerve discharges, and decreased due to glossopharyngeal nerve degeneration in the late phase of SAH; but this reflex pathway has not been definitively investigated. We studied the relationship between petrous ganglion of the glossopharyngeal nerve (GPN) and water vesicles of the choroid plexus (CP) in the early and late phases of SAH.

Methods: This study was conducted on 30 rabbits, divided into four groups, with five rabbits in the control group (group I), five rabbits in the sham group (Group II), and 20 rabbits in the SAH group. In the SAH group, five of the animals were decapitated after 4 days of cisternal blood injections (Group III), and the other 15 animals were decapitated after 20 days of injections (Group IV). The Petrous Ganglia and CPs of lateral ventricles were removed and stained for stereological analysis.

Results: The mean number of follicles per cubic millimeter was 5.3 ± 1.2 the in control group (Group I), 4.5 ± 0.9 in the sham group (Group II), 16.60 ± 3.77 the in early decapitated group (Group III), and 4.30 ± 0.84 in the late decapitated group (Group IV). The mean number of degenerated neuron density of petrous ganglions was 6 ± 2, 50 ± 6, 742 ± 96, and 2.420 ± 350 in the control (Group I), sham (Group II), early decapitated (Group III), and late decapitated group (Group IV), respectively. The mean number of water vesicles was statistically different after SAH between the early decapitated group (group III) and the late decapitated group (group IV) (P < 0.05).

Conclusions: We studied the relationship between petrous ganglion cells of the GPN and water vesicles of CP in the early and late phases of SAH, and found that CP vesicles are increased in the early phase of SAH due to irritation of GPN, and decreased in the late phase due to ischemic insult of the petrous ganglion and parasympathetic innervation of the CP.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00701-014-2088-7DOI Listing
July 2014

Important casual association of carotid body and glossopharyngeal nerve and lung following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in rabbits. First report.

J Neurol Sci 2014 Jan 8;336(1-2):220-6. Epub 2013 Nov 8.

Ataturk University Medical Faculty, Department of Pathology, Erzurum, Turkey.

Object: The glossopharyngeal nerves (GPNs) and carotid bodies (CBs) have an important role in the continuation of the cerebral autoregulation and cardiorespiratory functions. The relationship between degenerative injury of CB and the GPN in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was studied.

Methods: Twenty rabbits were included in this study. Five of them (n=5) were used as control group. The remaining animals (n=15) were exposed to experimental SAH. In the six animals of the SAH group, severe signs of illness were observed, and these six animals were killed in the first week after SAH. Others animals (n=9) were followed for 20 days and then sacrificed. GPNs and CBs were examined and, the live and degenerated GPN axon number, and of CB neuron numbers were stereologically estimated.

Results: The mean number of live neurons in CBs was 4206.67±148.35 and live axons of GPNs were 1211.66±14.29 in the animals of the control group. The number of degenerated neurons of CBs was 2065±110.27 and the number of degenerated axons of GPNs was 530.83±43.48 in early killed animals with SAH. The number of degenerated neurons of CBs and the number of degenerated axons of GPNs were found as 1013.89±4184 and 2270.5±134.38 in the living animals with SAH, respectively.

Conclusions: High number of degenerated axons of GPN and neurons of CBs of the early killed animals suggest that the mortality in early SAH might be due to GPNs injury secondary to compression of their axons or supplying vessels by the probably herniated brainstem, and secondary denervation injury of CBs, and lung.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jns.2013.10.047DOI Listing
January 2014

Clip ligation of unruptured intracranial aneurysms: a prospective midterm outcome study.

Acta Neurochir (Wien) 2012 Jul 29;154(7):1135-44. Epub 2012 May 29.

Clinic of Neurosurgery, Şişli Etfal Education and Research Hospital, Istanbul, 34077, Turkey.

Background: We conducted a prospective study to investigate the clinical and radiological outcome in a surgical case series of 176 patients with 203 unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA).

Methods: The success of aneurysm obliteration was assessed within 2 weeks after surgery by digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Patients also underwent angiography 5 years after surgery. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). All predictors of poor surgical outcomes were assessed using an exact logistic regression.

Results: Overall, 83 % of the patients had a good outcome (mRS score 0 or 1); 10.8 % of the patients had a slight disability (mRS score 2), and 6.2 % of the patients had a moderate or moderate-severe disability (mRS score 3 or 4). The mortality rate was 0 % overall. The most important predictors of outcome were presence of history of ischemic cerebrovascular disease and postoperative stroke. Complete aneurysm occlusion was achieved in 93.5 % of all aneurysms. Sixty percent of treated aneurysms were checked with late follow-up DSA. No cases of hemorrhage from a surgically obliterated UIA were documented in this series during the 7.3 ± 1.4 (SD)-year follow-up period.

Conclusions: If patients are carefully selected and individually assigned to their optimum treatment modality, IUAs can be obliterated by surgery with a low percentage of unfavorable outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00701-012-1397-yDOI Listing
July 2012

Value of early unilateral decompressive craniectomy in patients with severe traumatic brain injury.

Ulus Travma Acil Cerrahi Derg 2010 Mar;16(2):119-24

Department of Neurosurgery, Sişli Etfal Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.

Background: The aim of our study was to evaluate the results and effectiveness of early decompressive craniectomy in the treatment of severe traumatic brain injury.

Methods: We conducted a prospective study to investigate the clinical and radiological results of early unilateral decompressive craniectomy in 33 patients with severe traumatic brain injury. The mean area of the craniectomy, potential expansion volume of the decompressed brain, and distance between the lower border of the craniectomy and the temporal cranial base were calculated from computed tomography scans. Clinical results were analyzed with modified Rankin Scale (mRS).

Results: Time to surgery after trauma was 3.1+/-1.9 hours. There was a direct proportionality correlation between the area of the craniectomy and the calculated volume (p<0.0001). There was also a significant correlation between the state of the mesencephalic cisterns after craniectomy and the distance of the craniectomy to the base of the cranium (p<0.01). Assessment of overall one-year clinical outcome demonstrated favorable outcome (mRS 0-3) in 48.5% of patients.

Conclusion: The high overall morbidity and mortality rates demonstrated in our group despite the performance of early decompressive procedures reflect the severity of the underlying injuries.
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March 2010

Brain abscess: analysis of results in a series of 51 patients with a combined surgical and medical approach during an 11-year period.

Neurosurg Focus 2008 ;24(6):E9

Clinic of Neurosurgery, Sisli Etfal Education and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.

Object: In this study the authors' goal was to present the clinical and imaging results of the combined surgical and medical treatment of intracranial abscesses.

Methods: The authors retrospectively analyzed the data in 51 patients with intracranial abscesses who underwent surgery between January 1997 and November 2007. Patients were treated with aspiration through a single bur hole, total resection with open craniotomy, or image-guided stereotactic aspiration. Computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging was performed approximately 24 hours after surgery to evaluate the size of the abscess and almost weekly during follow-up until the abscess and/or cerebral edema was reduced. Clinical results were analyzed using modified Rankin Scale (mRS) scores.

Results: There were 36 male and 15 female patients, and their ages ranged from 14 months to 58 years (mean 29 years). Adjacent localized cranial infection was the most common predisposing factor in 31 patients (61%). Thirty-two patients were treated by repeated aspiration via a single bur hole. Streptococcus and Staphylococcus species were isolated most frequently. No statistically significant difference between causative organisms and clinical outcome was identified (p > 0.05). Assessment of overall 1-year clinical outcomes was favorable (mRS Scores 0-2) in 76.5% of patients (39 of 51 patients). The initial neurological condition was strongly correlated with the clinical outcome (p < 0.001).

Conclusions: A combination of surgical aspiration or removal of all abscesses > 2.5 cm in diameter, a 6-week or longer course of intravenous antibiotics, and weekly neuroimaging should yield cure rates of > 90% in patients with intracranial abscesses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3171/FOC/2008/24/6/E9DOI Listing
December 2008

A long-term follow-up study of anterior tibial allografting and instrumentation in the management of thoracolumbar tuberculous spondylitis.

J Neurosurg Spine 2008 Jan;8(1):30-8

Clinic of Neurosurgery, Sişli Etfal Education and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.

Object: The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of anterior instrumentation following radical debridement and tibial allografting and its long-term progression in patients with multilevel spinal tuberculosis.

Methods: This prospective observational study was undertaken to analyze 22 patients with multilevel spinal tuberculosis (Pott disease) who underwent anterior radical debridement, decompression, and fusion using anterior spinal instrumentation and tibial allograft replacement between 1999 and 2001. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale and a visual analog scale (VAS). Preoperative and postoperative plain radiographs were obtained, and the focal kyphotic angle of the surgically treated spinal segments and the overall sagittal and coronal contours of the thoracic and lumbar spine were evaluated in all patients.

Results: The mean follow-up time was 84 months (range 36-96 months). All patients demonstrated clinical healing of the tuberculosis infection. All patients showed evidence of successful bone fusion. The mean late postoperative kyphosis correction was 74% (range 63-91%). On average, 2 degrees (range 0-5 degrees ) of loss of correction was noted in the local kyphotic angle postoperatively in late follow-up findings. Evaluation of the surgical effect on sagittal global contours showed a significant correction rate in thoracic, thoracolumbar, and lumbar regions. The mean late postoperative coronal plane alignment correction was 99%. The ASIA Impairment Scale scores demonstrated significant improvement in late follow-up results in our series. Surgical decompression also resulted in a dramatic reduction of overall pain in all patients (late postoperative VAS score 1.61 +/- 0.81).

Conclusions: Anterior tibial allografting and instrumentation provide correction of the curvature, prevention of further deformation, improvement of sagittal and coronal balance, and restoration of neurological function in patients with spinal tuberculosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3171/SPI-08/01/030DOI Listing
January 2008

Midterm outcome after unilateral approach for bilateral decompression of lumbar spinal stenosis: 5-year prospective study.

Eur Spine J 2007 Dec 22;16(12):2133-42. Epub 2007 Aug 22.

Department of Neurosurgery, Sişli Etfal State Hospital, 34303, Istanbul, Turkey.

The aim of our study is to evaluate the results and effectiveness of bilateral decompression via a unilateral approach in the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. We have conducted a prospective study to compare the midterm outcome of unilateral laminotomy with unilateral laminectomy. One hundred patients with 269 levels of lumbar stenosis without instability were randomized to two treatment groups: unilateral laminectomy (Group 1), and laminotomy (Group 2). Clinical outcomes were assessed with the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36). Spinal canal size was measured pre- and postoperatively. The spinal canal was increased to 4-6.1-fold (mean 5.1 +/- SD 0.8-fold) the preoperative size in Group 1, and 3.3-5.9-fold (mean 4.7 +/- SD 1.1-fold) the preoperative size in Group 2. The mean follow-up time was 5.4 years (range 4-7 years). The ODI scores decreased significantly in both early and late follow-up evaluations and the SF-36 scores demonstrated significant improvement in late follow-up results in our series. Analysis of clinical outcome showed no statistical differences between two groups. For degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis unilateral approaches allowed sufficient and safe decompression of the neural structures and adequate preservation of vertebral stability, resulted in a highly significant reduction of symptoms and disability, and improved health-related quality of life.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00586-007-0471-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2140122PMC
December 2007

A perspective for the selection of surgical approaches in patients with upper thoracic and cervicothoracic junction instabilities.

Surg Neurol 2006 May;65(5):454-63; discussion 463

Sişili Etfal State Hospital, Clinic of Neurosurgery, Istanbul, Turkey.

Objective: To reach the upper thoracic vertebrae, a number of extensive approaches have been proposed. The purpose of this study is to provide a clear perspective for the selection of surgical approaches in patients who undergo vertebral body resection, reconstruction, and stabilization for upper thoracic and cervicothoracic junction instabilities.

Methods: Seventeen patients with upper thoracic or cervicothoracic junction (C7-T6) instability underwent surgery between January 1999 and May 2004. All patients presented with pain and/or neurological deficits. The causes of instabilities were 10 traumas and 7 pathological fractures. The approach chosen was primarily dictated by 3 factors including (1) type of injury, (2) level of lesion, and (3) time of admission. Ventral surgical approach was performed to all pathological and traumatic fractures causing anterior spinal cord compression. Level of lesion determined the selection of the type of ventral surgical approach, namely, supramanubrial, transmanubrial, or lateral transthoracic. On the other hand, combined (anterior and posterior) approach was performed to all late admitted trauma patients.

Results: Twelve anterior, 2 combined (anterior and posterior), and 3 posterior approaches were performed in this study. Anterior approaches included 3 transmanubrial, 5 upper lateral transthoracic, and 4 supramanubrial cervical dissection procedures for decompression, fusion, and plate-screw fixation depending on the levels of the lesion. The mean follow-up period was 18 months, ranging from 10 to 58 months. Nonunion or instrument-related complications were not observed. The postoperative neurological conditions were statistically significantly better than the preoperative ones (P = .003).

Conclusion: Consideration of the type of injury, level of lesion, and time of admission can provide a perspective for the selection of side of surgical approach for this transitional part of the spinal column. This study also suggests that supramanubrial cervical approach achieves sufficient exposure up to T2, transmanubrial approach for T3, and lateral transthoracic approach below T3.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.surneu.2005.08.017DOI Listing
May 2006