Publications by authors named "Osman Kucuk"

17 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Feeding Zinc-Biofortified Wheat Improves Performance, Nutrient Digestibility, and Concentrations of Blood and Tissue Minerals in Quails.

Biol Trace Elem Res 2021 Oct 12. Epub 2021 Oct 12.

Department of Animal Nutrition, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Firat University, Elazig, 23119, Turkey.

The present study aimed to investigate the effects of feeding zinc (Zn)-biofortified wheat on performance, digestibility, and concentrations of minerals in quails. Zinc biofortification of wheat has been realized in the field by ergonomically applying Zn to foliar two and three times, which increased grain Zn from 18 mg/kg (control) to 34 and 64 mg/kg. A total of 180 quails were divided into six groups, each containing 30 birds, and fed diets containing wheat grain with either 18, 34, or 64 mg/kg with or without zinc picolinate (ZnPic) supplementation. Bodyweight, feed intake, feed efficiency, and cold carcass weights were greater (P = 0.0001) when the quails were fed a diet containing the biofortified wheat-containing 64 mg Zn/kg. Nitrogen, ash, Ca, P, Zn, Cu, and Fe retentions were greater with the Zn-biofortified wheat-containing 64 mg Zn/kg (P ≤ 0.026). The nutrient excretions were low with feeding a diet containing biofortified wheat-containing 64 mg Zn/kg (P ≤ 0.023). Serum, liver, and heart Zn concentrations increased with feeding biofortified wheat-containing 64 mg Zn/kg (P ≤ 0.002). Thigh meat Fe concentrations increased with increasing Zn concentrations of the wheat samples used (P = 0.0001), whereas the liver Cu concentrations decreased with feeding the wheat-containing 64 mg Zn/kg (P = 0.004). The Zn-biofortified wheat-containing greater Zn concentrations, particularly 64 mg Zn/kg, is a good replacement for corn in the poultry diet as long as its availability and low cost for better performance, greater digestibility, and elevated tissue Zn and Fe concentrations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12011-021-02955-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8505784PMC
October 2021

Influence of dietary genistein and polyunsaturated fatty acids on lipid peroxidation and fatty acid composition of meat in quail exposed to heat stress.

Trop Anim Health Prod 2021 Oct 2;53(5):494. Epub 2021 Oct 2.

Department of Animal Nutrition Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Erciyes University, 38039, Kayseri, Turkey.

This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and genistein on performance and meat fatty acid profiles in quail exposed to heat stress. A total of 360 Japanese quail were divided into 12 groups in a 2 × 2 × 3 factorial design; each group comprised 30 quail with five replicates and were kept either at 22 ± 2 °C for 24 h/day (Thermoneutral, TN) or 34 ± 2 °C for 8 h/day (08:00 to 17:00 h) followed by 22 °C for 16 h (heat stress, HS) conditions. The diet contained either two levels of PUFA at 15 or 45% of total fat or three levels of genistein at 0, 400, or 800 mg/kg. Bodyweight gain, feed intake, and feed efficiency were lower (p ≥ 0.01) for quail reared under heat stress and fed low PUFA. Increasing dietary genistein in a linear manner improved the productive performance (p < 0.001). Heat stress caused increases in serum and thigh meat malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations and decreases in genistein and vitamin E and A concentrations in serum and thigh meat (p < 0.001). High PUFA (PUFA45) in the diet of quail caused greater 18:2, 18:3 ALA, EPA, DHA, n-6, and n-3 PUFA as well as total PUFA and total USFA percentages (p < 0.001) in the thigh muscle, some of which decreased with heat stress (p ≥ 0.006) with no regard to genistein supplementation. This study revealed that genistein with greater doses along with greater PUFA inclusion to the diet of quail reared under heat stress is recommended for alleviating adverse effects of heat stress and for yielding healthier meat for human consumption.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11250-021-02933-7DOI Listing
October 2021

Bioavailability of a Capsaicin Lipid Multi-particulate Formulation in Rats.

Eur J Drug Metab Pharmacokinet 2021 Sep 21;46(5):645-650. Epub 2021 Jul 21.

Lonza Consumer Health Inc., Morristown, NJ, USA.

Background And Objective: Because of the stomach-burning sensation it induces, capsaicin has been used at relatively low doses as a nutritional supplement, which has limited its bioavailability. The objective of this study was to investigate the serum bioavailability of capsaicin supplementation with or without a lipid multi-particulate (LMP) formulation.

Methods: Thirty-five rats were divided into five groups and administered capsaicin at either 0.2 or 1 mg/kg with or without the LMP formulation. Capsaicin bioavailability was assessed based on the area under the concentation-time curve (AUC), the time to peak concentration (T), and the peak serum concentration (C).

Results: For each formulation, the capsaicin C was reached at 90 min and decreased thereafter. Serum capsaicin concentrations were greater in rats administered the higher dose of capsaicin (1 mg/kg) in the LMP formulation at all measurement times (P  ≤ 0.05). The AUC showed a significant increase, about 20%, when capsaicin was administered in the LMP formulation at the high dose (P  = 0.002). The T for oral capsaicin was similar whether or not administration was via the LMP formulation (P  = 0.163). However, the C of capsaicin increased in a dose-dependent manner (P  < 0.05). Although the LMP formulation of the high dose of capsaicin resulted in a numerically higher C, it was not statistically significantly higher (P  = 0.068).

Conclusions: The present work demonstrated that administration of capsaicin via the LMP formulation significantly impacted the pharmacokinetic parameters and the serum bioavailability of orally administered 1 mg/kg capsaicin in rats. The bioavailability of capsaicin in humans may also be increased by using the LMP formulation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13318-021-00697-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8397674PMC
September 2021

Niacinamide and undenatured type II collagen modulates the inflammatory response in rats with monoiodoacetate-induced osteoarthritis.

Sci Rep 2021 07 19;11(1):14724. Epub 2021 Jul 19.

Lonza Inc., Consumer Health and Nutrition, Morristown, NJ, USA.

The current work aimed to examine the properties of oral supplementation of niacinamide and undenatured type II collagen (UCII) on the inflammation and joint pain behavior of rats with osteoarthritis (OA). Forty-nine Wistar rats were allocated into seven groups; control (no MIA), MIA as a non-supplemental group with monosodium iodoacetate (MIA)-induced knee osteoarthritis, MIA + undenatured type II collagen (UCII) at 4 mg/kg BW, MIA + Niacinamide at 40 mg/kg BW (NA40), MIA + Niacinamide at 200 mg/kg BW (NA200), MIA + UCII + NA40 and MIA + UCII + NA200. Serum IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, COMP, and CRP increased in rats with OA and decreased in UCII and NA groups (p < 0.05). Rats with osteoarthritis had greater serum MDA and knee joint MMP-3, NF-κB, and TGβ protein levels and decreased in treated groups with UCII and NA (p < 0.05). The rats with OA also bore elevated joint diameters with joint pain behavior measured as decreased the stride lengths, the paw areas, and the paw widths, and increased the Kellgren-Lawrence and the Mankin scores (p < 0.05) and decreased in UCII treated groups. These results suggest the combinations with the UCII + NA supplementation as being most effective and reduce the inflammation responses for most OA symptoms in rats.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-94142-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8289820PMC
July 2021

Effects of magnesium biotinate supplementation on serum insulin, glucose and lipid parameters along with liver protein levels of lipid metabolism in rats.

Magnes Res 2021 Feb;34(1):9-19

Research and Development, Nutrition 21, LLC, New York, USA.

The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of a novel form of biotin (magnesium biotinate) on serum glucose, lipid profile, and hepatic lipid metabolism-related protein levels in rats. Forty-two rats were divided into six groups and fed a standard diet-based egg white powdered diet supplemented with either d-biotin at 0.01, 1, or 100 mg/kg BW or magnesium biotinate at 0.01, 1, or 100 mg/kg BW for 35 days. Neither form of biotin influenced (p > 0.05) serum glucose or insulin concentrations. Serum total cholesterol and triglyceride decreased with biotin from both sources (p < 0.05). Concentrations were lower with magnesium biotinate when comparing the 1 mg/kg dose (p < 0.05). Serum, liver, and brain biotin and liver cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) concentrations were greater when rats were treated with magnesium biotinate versus d-biotin, particularly when comparing the 1 and 100 mg/kg dose groups (p < 0.05). Both biotin forms decreased the liver SREBP-1c and FAS and increased AMPK-α1, ACC-1, ACC-2, PCC, and MCC levels (p < 0.05). The magnitudes of responses were more emphasized with magnesium biotinate. Magnesium biotinate, compared with a commercial d-biotin, is more effective in reducing serum lipid concentrations and regulating protein levels of lipid metabolism-related biomarkers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1684/mrh.2021.0480DOI Listing
February 2021

Effects of supplementing different chromium histidinate complexes on glucose and lipid metabolism and related protein expressions in rats fed a high-fat diet.

J Trace Elem Med Biol 2021 May 23;65:126723. Epub 2021 Jan 23.

Research and Development, Nutrition 21, LLC, NY, United States.

Background: The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of different chromium histidinate (CrHis) complexes added to the diet of rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD) on body weight changes, glucose and lipid metabolism parameters, and changes in biomarkers such as PPAR-γ, IRS-1, GLUTs, and NF-κB proteins.

Methods: Forty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were divided equally into six groups and fed either a control, an HFD, or an HFD supplemented with either CrHis1, CrHis2, CrHis3, or a combination of the CrHis complexes as CrHisM.

Results: Feeding an HFD to rats increased body weights, HOMA-IR values, fasting serum glucose, insulin, leptin, free fatty acid, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and MDA concentrations as well as AST activities, and decreased serum and brain serotonin concentrations compared with rats fed a control diet (P <  0.0001). The levels of the PPAR-γ, IRS-1, and GLUTs in the liver and brain decreased, while NF-κB level increased, with feeding an HFD (P <  0.05). Although all the CrHis supplements reversed the negative effects of feeding an HFD (P <  0.05), the CrHis1 complex was most effective in changing the protein levels, while CrHisM was most effective in influencing certain parameters such as body weight and serum metabolites.

Conclusion: The results of the present work suggest that the CrHis1 complex is most potent for alleviating the negative effects of feeding an HFD. The efficacy of CrHisM is likely due to the presence of the CrHis1 complex.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtemb.2021.126723DOI Listing
May 2021

Effects of taurine supplementation on productive performance, nutrient digestibility and gene expression of nutrient transporters in quails reared under heat stress.

J Therm Biol 2020 Aug 1;92:102668. Epub 2020 Aug 1.

Department of Animal Nutrition, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Firat University, Elazig, 23119, Turkey.

This study was conducted to examine the effects of dietary taurine supplementation on productive performance, nutrient digestibility, antioxidant status, and the gene expression of ileal nutrient transporters in laying quails reared under heat stress (HS). One hundred and eighty laying Japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica) were fed a basal diet or basal diet supplemented with either 2.5 or 5 g of taurine per kg of diet, and reared at either 22 ± 2 °C for 24 h/d (thermoneutral, TN) or 34 ± 2 °C for 8 h/d (HS) for 12 weeks. The quails reared under HS consumed less feed, produced less egg, and had lower dry matter, organic matter and crude protein apparent digestibilities compared with the quails reared under the TN condition (P = 0.001). However, increasing taurine concentrations in the diet improved feed intake and egg production (P = 0.001), but also the apparent digestibilities (P ≤ 0.027) in quails reared under HS. The greater doses (5 g/kg) of taurine resulted in more responses. The quails reared under HS had greater serum and liver MDA concentrations (P = 0.0001) which decreased with dietary taurine supplementations, particularly greater doses. The gene expressions of ileal PEPT1, EAAT3, CAT1, CAT2, SGLT1, SGLT5, GLUT2, and GLUT5 decreased under HS conditions (P = 0.001). However, supplementing taurine, in a dose-dependent fashion, to the diet of quails reared under HS resulted in increases in the gene expressions of the transporters (P < 0.05) except for CAT1. The results of the present work showed that taurine supplementation, particularly with greater doses (5 g/kg), to the diet of laying quails kept under HS acts as alleviating negative effects of HS, resulting in improvements in productive performance and nutrient digestion, and also upregulation of ileal nutrient transporters.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtherbio.2020.102668DOI Listing
August 2020

A Dose-Dependent Effect of Carnipure Tartrate Supplementation on Endurance Capacity, Recovery, and Body Composition in an Exercise Rat Model.

Nutrients 2020 May 23;12(5). Epub 2020 May 23.

Lonza Consumer Health Inc., Morristown, NJ 07960, USA.

The objective of this work is to investigate the effects of Carnipure Tartrate (CT) supplementation with or without exercise on endurance capacity, recovery, and fatigue by assessing time to exhaustion as well as body weight and composition in rats. In addition, antioxidant capacity has been evaluated by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and antioxidant enzyme (superoxide dismutase, SOD; catalase, CAT; glutathioneperoxidase; GSHPx) activities. Fifty-six male Wistar rats were divided into eight groups including seven rats each. A control group did not receive CT nor exercise. Another control group received 200 mg/kg CT without exercise. The other six groups of rats went through an exercise regimen consisting of a 5-day training period with incremental exercise capacity, which was followed by 6 weeks of the run at 25 m/min for 45 min every day. CT was supplemented at 0, 25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg per day during the 6 weeks. Rats submitted to exercise and supplemented with CT had a significant and dose-dependent increase in time to exhaustion and this effect seems to be independent of exercise ( < 0.05). Additionally, recovery and fatigue were improved, as shown by a significant and dose-dependent decrease in myoglobin and lactic acid plasma levels, which are two markers of muscle recovery. CT supplementation led to a dose-response decrease in body weight and visceral fat. These effects become significant at 200 and 400 mg/kg doses ( < 0.05). Additionally, the antioxidant capacity was improved, as shown by a significant and dose-dependent increase in SOD, CAT, and GSHPx. Serum MDA concentrations decreased in exercising rats with CT supplementation. CT supplementation led to a decrease in serum glucose, triglycerides, and total cholesterol concentrations with the lowest levels observed at 400 mg/kg dose ( < 0.05). These effects correlated with a significant dose-dependent increase in serum total L-carnitine, free L-carnitine, and acetyl-carnitine, which linked the observed efficacy to CT supplementation. These results demonstrate that CT supplementation during exercise provides benefits on exercise performance, recovery, and fatigue as well as improved the lipid profile and antioxidant capacity. The lowest dose leads to some of these effects seen in rats where 25 mg/kg corresponds to 250 mg/day as a human equivalent.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu12051519DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7284330PMC
May 2020

Effect of supplementing chromium histidinate and picolinate complexes along with biotin on insulin sensitivity and related metabolic indices in rats fed a high-fat diet.

Food Sci Nutr 2019 Jan 1;7(1):183-194. Epub 2018 Dec 1.

Department of Animal Nutrition Faculty of Veterinary Science Firat University Elazig Turkey.

Scope: To investigate the effects of chromium histidinate (CrHis) and chromium picolinate (CrPic) complex along with biotin to a high-fat diet (HFD) fed to rats on the insulin sensitivity and the anti-obesity properties.

Methods: Forty-two Sprague-Dawley male rats were divided into six groups. The rats were fed either (a): a standard diet (Control) or (b): a HFD or (c): a HFD with biotin (HFD+B) or (d): a combination of HFD and biotin along with CrPic (HFD + B + CrPic) or (e): a combination of HFD and biotin along with CrHis (HFD + B + CrHis) or (f): a combination of HFD and biotin along with CrHis and CrPic (HFD + B + CrHis + CrPic).

Results: Adding biotin with chromium to HFD improved the glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR, leptin, lipid profile, with HFD+B+CrHis treatment being the most effective ( = 0.0001). Serum, liver, and brain tissue Cr concentrations increased upon Cr supplementations (= 0.0001). Supplementing CrHis along with biotin to a HFD (HFD + B + CrHis) provided the greatest levels of GLUT-1, GLUT-3, PPAR-γ, and IRS-1, but the lowest level of NF-κB in the brain and liver tissues.

Conclusion: Biotin supplementation with chromium complexes, CrHis in particular, to a HFD pose to be a potential therapeutic feature for the treatment of insulin resistance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/fsn3.851DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6341138PMC
January 2019

Laying performance, digestibility and plasma hormones in laying hens exposed to chronic heat stress as affected by betaine, vitamin C, and/or vitamin E supplementation.

Springerplus 2016 20;5(1):1619. Epub 2016 Sep 20.

Department of Poultry Nutrition, Animal Production Research Institute, Ministry of Agriculture and Land Reclamation, Agriculture Research Center, Giza, Egypt.

Heat stress had a negative effect on laying hens' performance, thus this research was to study the influences of betaine (Bet, 1000 mg/kg betaine), vitamin C (VC, 200 mg/kg ascorbic acid), and vitamin E (VE, 150 mg/kg α-Tocopherol acetate) and their possible combinations on egg production, digestibility of nutrients, plasma hormones and reproductive organs of dual-purpose hens exposed to chronic heat stress. Two hundred and eighty eight hens and thirty-six cocks from 32 to 48 weeks of age were divided into nine treatment groups of four replicates, each containing eight hens and one cock. One group was kept under thermo-natural condition and the eight others were kept under chronic heat stress (CHS). One of these eight was used as a negative control, while the others were supplemented with VC, VE and/or betaine and their possible combinations. Body weights, laying rate, feed intake, and feed conversion ratio in hens reared under CHS rooster without any supplementation during 32 to 48 weeks of impairment (P = 0.0052) were recorded. Hens reared under heat stress and fed a diet supplemented with either Bet, VC, VE or combination of the supplements increased production traits. However, hens supplemented with VC showed the greatest production traits. Plasma glucose, estradiol-17 (E2), progesterone (P4), tri-iodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) decreased in hens reared under CHS and fed a diet with no supplementation compared to the other treatments (P = 0.001). Liver weights, spleen weights, thyroid gland weights, ovary weights, oviduct weights and oviduct lengths were lowest in hens reared under CHS and fed a diet with no supplementation (P = 0.0480). In conclusion, dual purpose hens reared under CHS and supplemented with VC at 200 mg/kg diet and Bet at 1000 mg/kg enhanced the laying performance and combated CHS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40064-016-3304-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5028346PMC
September 2016

Anti-diabetic activity of chromium picolinate and biotin in rats with type 2 diabetes induced by high-fat diet and streptozotocin.

Br J Nutr 2013 Jul 5;110(2):197-205. Epub 2012 Dec 5.

Department of Animal Nutrition, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Firat University, Elazig 23119, Turkey.

The objective of the present study was to evaluate anti-diabetic effects of chromium picolinate (CrPic) and biotin supplementations in type 2 diabetic rats. The type 2 diabetic rat model was induced by high-fat diet (HFD) and low-dose streptozotocin. The rats were divided into five groups as follows: (1) non-diabetic rats fed a regular diet; (2) diabetic rats fed a HFD; (3) diabetic rats fed a HFD and supplemented with CrPic (80 μg/kg body weight (BW) per d); (4) diabetic rats fed a HFD and supplemented with biotin (300 μg/kg BW per d); (5) diabetic rats fed a HFD and supplemented with both CrPic and biotin. Circulating glucose, cortisol, total cholesterol, TAG, NEFA and malondialdehyde concentrations decreased (P< 0·05), but serum insulin concentrations increased (P< 0·05) in diabetic rats treated with biotin and CrPic, particularly with a combination of the supplements. Feeding a HFD to diabetic rats decreased PPAR-γ expression in adipose tissue and phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate 1 (p-IRS-1) expression of liver, kidney and muscle tissues, while the supplements increased (P< 0·001) PPAR-γ and p-IRS-1 expressions in relevant tissues. Expression of NF-κB in the liver and kidney was greater in diabetic rats fed a HFD, as compared with rats fed a regular diet (P< 0·01). The supplements decreased the expression of NF-κB in diabetic rats (P< 0·05). Results of the present study revealed that supplementing CrPic and biotin alone or in a combination exerts anti-diabetic activities, probably through modulation of PPAR-γ, IRS-1 and NF-κB proteins.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0007114512004850DOI Listing
July 2013

Changes in serum mineral concentrations, biochemical and hematological parameters in horses with pica.

Biol Trace Elem Res 2011 Mar 9;139(3):301-7. Epub 2010 Mar 9.

Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Mustafa Kemal, Hatay, Turkey.

The aim of this study was to compare hematological, some biochemical parameters, and serum trace element concentrations in horses with or without pica. Fifteen horses with pica (group I) and another 15 healthy horses without pica (group II) were used. The hematological parameters were not changed between the two groups. In group I, hemoglobin values were lower than those of group II. However, the difference in hemoglobin values between the two groups was not significant (P > 0.05). Serum iron and copper concentrations and the copper/zinc ratio were lower in group I than those of group II (P < 0.05). The other biochemical parameters were not found to be statistically different between the two groups (P > 0.05). It was concluded that serum iron and copper deficiency may play an important role for the etiology of pica in horses. Prophylactic use of iron and copper supplements in horses may be beneficial to prevent pica.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12011-010-8660-yDOI Listing
March 2011

Arterial bending angle and wall morphology correlate with slow coronary flow: determination with multidetector CT coronary angiography.

Eur J Radiol 2011 Jan 31;77(1):111-7. Epub 2009 Jul 31.

Department of Radiology, Medical Faculty, Atatürk University, Erzurum, Turkey.

Background And Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess angulations and vessel wall morphology that could lead to bending head loss in the RCA and LMCA arteries of patients with slow coronary flow (SCF) evaluated by MDCT coronary angiography.

Methods: The study involved 51 patients (45 males, mean age: 59.6 years) who were diagnosed with SCF by coronary angiography. Diagnosis of SCF was based on thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) frame count. Fifty-one patients with absence of slow flow were selected as the control group. The angulations of the main coronary arteries with the aorta were measured from the axial images obtained through MDCT coronary angiography, and the findings were recorded. In addition, the coronary artery walls of these patients were evaluated. For statistical analysis, SPSS for Windows 10.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL) was used. For comparisons of the angles, either independent samples t test or the Mann-Whitney U test was used where appropriate.

Results: The results of the study indicated that 38 patients had SCF in the LAD. Comparisons of patients with SCF with the controls revealed that in the patients with SCF, the mean angle of the LMCA with the aorta (40.9±20.5°) was statistically significantly smaller than the mean angle of the LMCA with the aorta in the control cases (71.8±11°). In 12 patients, slow flow was detected in the RCA. Those with slow flow in the RCA had significantly smaller angles (mean: 33.2±20.4°) than the other cases (mean: 78.9±10.7°).

Conclusion: A small angle of origin of the main coronary arteries from the aorta, measured on MDCT examinations is correlated with slow blood flow in those vessels, as calculated by the TIMI frame count in catheter coronary angiography.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejrad.2009.07.002DOI Listing
January 2011

Supplemental zinc and vitamin A can alleviate negative effects of heat stress in broiler chickens.

Biol Trace Elem Res 2003 Sep;94(3):225-35

Department of Animal Nutrition, Faculty of Veterinary, University of Firat, 23100 Elazig, Turkey.

This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of zinc (ZnSO4.H2O) and vitamin A (retinol) supplementation on performance, carcass characteristics, and serum concentrations of glucose, cholesterol, total protein, and malondialdehyde (MDA) as an indicator of lipid peroxidation in broiler chickens (Ross) reared at a high temperature (34 degrees C). One hundred twenty 10-d-old male broilers were randomly assigned to 4 treatment groups, 3 replicates of 10 birds each. The birds were fed either a basal diet or the basal diet supplemented with either 30 mg Zn/kg diet, 4.5 mg (15,000 IU) retinol/kg diet, or 30 mg Zn + 4.5 mg retinol/kg diet. Supplemental zinc and vitamin A significantly increased live weight gain and improved feed efficiency (p<0.05). However, a combination of zinc and vitamin A, rather than each separately, provided a greater performance. Hot and chilled carcass weights and yields and the weights of internal organs with the exception of abdominal fat were greater for each supplement (p<0.05) compared to the control group. Abdominal fat decreased (p<0.05) upon dietary zinc and vitamin A supplementation. Supplemental treatments resulted in an increased total serum protein but decreased glucose, cholesterol, and MDA concentrations. The results of the study show that, separately or as a combination, zinc and vitamin A supplementation resulted in an improved live weight gain, feed efficiency, and carcass traits, as well as a decrease in serum MDA concentrations. The results of the present study also suggest that zinc and vitamin A have similar effects and that a combination of zinc and vitamin A may offer a potential protective management practice in preventing heat-stress-related depression in performance of broiler chickens.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1385/BTER:94:3:225DOI Listing
September 2003

Effects of dietary chromium and ascorbic acid supplementation on digestion of nutrients, serum antioxidant status, and mineral concentrations in laying hens reared at a low ambient temperature.

Biol Trace Elem Res 2002 ;87(1-3):113-24

Department of Animal Nutrition, Faculty of Veterinary, University of Firat, Elazig, Turkey.

This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of chromium (chromium picolinate, CrPic) and vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid) supplementation on the digestion of nutrients and serum concentration of some antioxidant vitamins and minerals of laying hens (Hy-Line) reared at a low ambient temperature (6.8 degrees C). One hundred twenty laying hens (32 wk old) were divided into 4 groups, 30 hens per group. The laying hens were fed either a basal diet or the basal diet supplemented with either 400 microg of Cr/kg diet, 250 mg of L-ascorbic acid/kg diet, or 400 microg of Cr plus 250 mg L-ascorbic acid/kg diet. The digestibility of nutrients (DM, OM, CP, and EE) increased by the supplementation of chromium and vitamin C (p < 0.05). Supplemental chromium and vitamin C also increased serum vitamin C and E but decreased malondialdehyde concentrations (p < 0.05). Additionally, supplemental chromium and vitamin C caused an increase in the serum concentrations of Fe, Zn, Mn, and Cr (p < 0.05) but a decrease in Cu concentration. The results of the present study showed that each dietary supplement influenced most of the parameters measured in a similar way. Also, a combination of the two supplements resulted in an additive effect, and supplementing a combination of vitamin C (250 mg/kg of diet) and chromium (400 microg Cr/kg diet) may offer a potential protective management practice in preventing cold-stress-related depression in the performance of laying hens.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1385/BTER:87:1-3:113DOI Listing
December 2002

Effects of vitamin C and vitamin E on lipid peroxidation status, serum hormone, metabolite, and mineral concentrations of Japanese quails reared under heat stress (34 degrees C).

Int J Vitam Nutr Res 2002 Mar;72(2):91-100

Department of Animal Nutrition, Veterinary Faculty, University of Firat, 23119 Elazig, Turkey.

This study was conducted to determine the effects of dietary vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid) and vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol acetate) on lipid peroxidation status measured as MDA and serum triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), as well as some other serum metabolite and mineral concentrations of Japanese quails reared under heat stress (34 degrees C). One hundred-eighty 10-day-old Japanese quails were randomly assigned to six treatment groups, three replicates of 10 birds each. Using a 2 x 3 factorial design, the birds received two levels of vitamin C (100 and 200 mg/kg of diet) or three levels of vitamin E (125, 250, or 500 mg/kg of diet). Greater dietary vitamin E and vitamin C resulted in a greater serum T3, T4, and TSH (p = 0.001), but lower ACTH (p = 0.001) concentrations. Serum concentrations of T4 and TSH increased to a greater extent by increasing dietary vitamin C when greater vitamin E levels were fed (interaction, p = 0.001). Serum glucose, urea, triglycerides, and cholesterol concentrations decreased (p = 0.001), while protein and albumin concentrations increased (p = 0.001) when both dietary vitamin C and vitamin E were increased. Serum activities of SGOT and SGPT were not influenced by dietary vitamin C and vitamin E (p > 0.43). However, serum activity of AP increased (p = 0.001) by increasing both dietary vitamin C and vitamin E. Increasing both dietary vitamin C and vitamin E caused an increase in serum concentrations of Ca, P, K (p = 0.001), Fe, and Zn (p = 0.01) but a decrease in serum concentrations of Na (p = 0.001) and Cu (p = 0.01). Interactions between vitamin C and vitamin E were detected for Ca, P, Na, and K (p = 0.001). Greater dietary vitamin C and vitamin E resulted in a greater serum and liver vitamin E, C, and A (p < or = 0.05), but lower MDA (p = 0.001) concentrations. Results of the present study conclude that supplementing a combination of dietary vitamin C (200 mg) and vitamin E (250-500 mg) offers a good management practice to reduce heat stress-related decreases in performance of Japanese quails.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1024/0300-9831.72.2.91DOI Listing
March 2002
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