Publications by authors named "Oskar Gonzalez"

16 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Optimization and Validation of HS-GC/MS Method for the Controlled Release Study of Microencapsulated Specific Bioattractants for Target-Plaguicide Production.

Molecules 2021 Feb 13;26(4). Epub 2021 Feb 13.

Analytical Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Spain.

Insect plagues are a problem often hard to solve due to the harmful effects caused by the pesticides used to combat them. Consequently, the pesticide market is increasingly trying to develop new technologies to prevent the unwanted effects that common plague treatments usually bring with them. In this work, four specific bioattractants of , extracted from fungi (β-ocimene, phenol, p-cresol, and indole) were microencapsulated with β-cyclodextrin in order to produce an economically and environmentally sustainable bait containing biocides in the near future. Cyclodextrins will retain these volatile compounds until their use by the consumer when the product comes into contact with water. Then, the bioattractants will be released in the medium in a controlled manner. An analytical methodology based on headspace extraction coupled to gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (HS-GC/MS) has been developed and validated following Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and European Commission Directorate General for Health and Food Safety guidelines for the bioattractants controlled release study from the microencapsulated product. The analytical method has been shown to be accurate and precise and has the sensitivity required for controlled release studies of the four bioattractants analyzed. The release of the bioattractants from microencapsulated products achieved the "plateau" after 3 h in all cases.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules26040996DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7917701PMC
February 2021

Comparison of liver and plasma metabolic profiles in piglets of different ages as animal models for paediatric population.

Analyst 2020 Oct;145(21):6859-6867

Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940, Leioa, Spain.

Liver plays an important role in drug metabolism, so studying the grade of maturation of this organ would help to develop more appropriate dosing regimens for paediatric populations. Nevertheless, considering the invasive nature of liver analyses there are obvious ethical boundaries, particularly in babies and children. In this work, we investigated the suitability of blood plasma as an alternative matrix to evaluate the biological age of liver. With this aim, we studied the correlation of plasma and liver metabolomic profiles obtained by HPLC-TOF-MS for piglets of different ages (newborns, neonates and infants). By means of Pearson correlation analysis we observed that 360 and 1784 pairs of metabolite features were significantly correlated in positive and negative ionization mode, respectively. Procrustes analysis was applied in order to assess the similarity of the clustering resulting from the data obtained from the two matrices and the two ionisation modes. The Procrustes distances were low for both ESI+ (0.3753) and ESI- (0.3673) and, hence, liver and plasma are expected to provide similar discriminatory information. Furthermore, we found that Multiblock Principal Component Analysis (MB-PCA) readily allowed us to combine the data obtained from both matrices and to better understand the clustering according to the three study groups. Considering all these results, we suggest that plasma can provide valuable insight into the maturation grade of liver in order to provide accurate dosing in paediatric population.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/d0an00254bDOI Listing
October 2020

Optimization of XCMS parameters for LC-MS metabolomics: an assessment of automated versus manual tuning and its effect on the final results.

Metabolomics 2020 01 10;16(1):14. Epub 2020 Jan 10.

Department of Biochemistry, Institute of Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool, Biosciences Building, Crown Street, Liverpool, L69 7ZB, UK.

Introduction: Several software packages containing diverse algorithms are available for processing Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS) chromatographic data and within these deconvolution packages different parameters settings can lead to different outcomes. XCMS is the most widely used peak picking and deconvolution software for metabolomics, but the parameter selection can be hard for inexpert users. To solve this issue, the automatic optimization tools such as Isotopologue Parameters Optimization (IPO) can be extremely helpful.

Objectives: To evaluate the suitability of IPO as a tool for XCMS parameters optimization and compare the results with those manually obtained by an exhaustive examination of the LC-MS characteristics and performance.

Methods: Raw HPLC-TOF-MS data from two types of biological samples (liver and plasma) analysed in both positive and negative electrospray ionization modes from three groups of piglets were processed with XCMS using parameters optimized following two different approaches: IPO and Manual. The outcomes were compared to determine the advantages and disadvantages of using each method.

Results: IPO processing produced the higher number of repeatable (%RSD < 20) and significant features for all data sets and allowed the different piglet groups to be distinguished. Nevertheless, on multivariate level, similar clustering results were obtained by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) when applied to IPO and manual matrices.

Conclusion: IPO is a useful optimization tool that helps in choosing the appropriate parameters. It works well on data with a good LC-MS performance but the lack of such adequate data can result in unrealistic parameter settings, which might require further investigation and manual tuning. On the contrary, manual selection criteria requires deeper knowledge on LC-MS, programming language and XCMS parameter interpretation, but allows a better fine-tuning of the parameters, and thus more robust deconvolution.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11306-020-1636-9DOI Listing
January 2020

Fumagillin, a Mycotoxin of : Biosynthesis, Biological Activities, Detection, and Applications.

Toxins (Basel) 2019 12 20;12(1). Epub 2019 Dec 20.

Fungal and Bacterial Biomics Research Group, Department of Immunology, Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940-Leioa, Spain.

Fumagillin is a mycotoxin produced, above all, by the saprophytic filamentous fungus . This mold is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause invasive aspergillosis, a disease that has high mortality rates linked to it. Its ability to adapt to environmental stresses through the production of secondary metabolites, including several mycotoxins (gliotoxin, fumagillin, pseurotin A, etc.) also seem to play an important role in causing these infections. Since the discovery of the fumagillin in 1949, many studies have focused on this toxin and in this review we gather all the information currently available. First of all, the structural characteristics of this mycotoxin and the different methods developed for its determination are given in detail. Then, the biosynthetic gene cluster and the metabolic pathway involved in its production and regulation are explained. The activity of fumagillin on its target, the methionine aminopeptidase type 2 (MetAP2) enzyme, and the effects of blocking this enzyme in the host are also described. Finally, the applications that this toxin and its derivatives have in different fields, such as the treatment of cancer and its microsporicidal activity in the treatment of honeybee hive infections with Nosema spp., are reviewed. Therefore, this work offers a complete review of all the information currently related to the fumagillin mycotoxin secreted by , important because of its role in the fungal infection process but also because it has many other applications, notably in beekeeping, the treatment of infectious diseases, and in oncology.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/toxins12010007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7020470PMC
December 2019

Analysis of the Heterogeneous Distribution of Amiloride and Propranolol in Dried Blood Spot by UHPLC-FLD and MALDI-IMS.

Molecules 2019 Nov 26;24(23). Epub 2019 Nov 26.

Analytical Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Biscay, Basque Country, Spain.

Dried blood spot (DBS) has lately experienced an increase in its use in bioanalysis due to its several advantages compared with traditional blood sampling methods. Nevertheless, the use of DBS with quantitative purposes is hindered by the heterogeneous distribution of some compounds in the supporting matrix and the dependence of the response on different factors, such as the hematocrit, blood volume, and sampling position. In this study the effect of those factors in the analytical response was investigated by ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to fluorescence detection, using amiloride and propranolol as model compounds. The results showed a heterogeneous and drug-dependent distribution of the compounds in the blood spot. While amiloride concentration was higher in the center, propranolol concentration was higher in the periphery of the spot. Besides, the influence of the hematocrit on the quantitative results was observed. MALDI mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-IMS) has allowed study of the distribution of the two cardiovascular drugs when they were placed in the DBS card using water:methanol solutions, demonstrating that they followed a similar distribution pattern as in blood. This work has showed the potentiality of the MALDI-IMS technique to predict the distribution of the drugs in the DBS card.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules24234320DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6930677PMC
November 2019

Chromatographic methods for echinocandin antifungal drugs determination in bioanalysis.

Bioanalysis 2019 Jun 17;11(12):1217-1228. Epub 2019 Jun 17.

Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Science & Technology, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), PO Box 644, 48080 Bilbao, Basque Country, Spain.

The increase of fungal resistance to drugs, such as azole family, gave rise to the development of new antifungals. In this context, echinocandins emerged as a promising alternative for antifungal therapies. Following the commercialization of caspofungin in 2001, echinocandins became the first-line therapy for invasive candidiasis in different patient populations. The quantification of these drugs has gained importance since pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic and resistance studies are a paramount concern. This fact has led us to exhaustively examine the methodologies used for the analysis of echinocandins in biological fluids, which are mainly based on LC coupled to different detection techniques. In this review, we summarize the analytical methods for the quantification of echinocandins focusing on sample treatment, chromatographic separation and detection methods.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4155/bio-2019-0045DOI Listing
June 2019

Metabolomic analysis for the study of maturation in pediatrics: Effect of confounding factors in a pilot study.

Electrophoresis 2017 09 14;38(18):2323-2330. Epub 2017 Jun 14.

Analytical Chemistry Department, Science and Technology Faculty, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Bilbao, Basque Country, Spain.

A pilot study for the investigation of the maturation grade of children has been carried out using plasma samples already analyzed in a previous pharmacokinetic study. By using a meticulous data treatment, possible confounding factors that may hinder the obtained results were identified. By doing so, it was possible to obtain enough evidence to support the feasibility of performing a larger study eluding some unwanted variability and minimizing not only the number of subjects involved but also the time and money spent on the study. In the pilot study the metabolic profiles obtained using UHPLC-TOF-MS technique of plasma samples from 14 newborn piglets (<5 days) were compared with the plasma profiles of 16 infant piglets (8 weeks). The type of anaesthesia administered, gender, vein or artery of blood extraction and time of sampling were studied as possible confounding factors. Unsupervised analysis by principal component analysis (PCA) clearly differentiated between neonates and children. During the data treatment and the statistical analysis, the effect of confounding factors such as the anaesthetic regimen was identified and removed, while the effect of the rest of studied factors was not considered relevant, and the discrimination between the two groups based on the age was maintained. This allowed extracting relevant conclusions for a future study design while avoiding the unnecessary sacrifice of animals. Furthermore, the results obtained demonstrate the utility of metabolomics in the discovery of novel putative plasma biomarkers such as carnitines that can be correlated with the maturation state of paediatric patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/elps.201700026DOI Listing
September 2017

Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Paracetamol Uptake and Clearance in Zebrafish Larvae: Expanding the Allometric Scale in Vertebrates with Five Orders of Magnitude.

Zebrafish 2016 12 15;13(6):504-510. Epub 2016 Sep 15.

1 Division of Analytical Biosciences, Systems Pharmacology Cluster, Leiden Academic Centre for Drug Research, Leiden University , Leiden, The Netherlands .

Zebrafish larvae (Danio rerio) are increasingly used to translate findings regarding drug efficacy and safety from in vitro-based assays to vertebrate species, including humans. However, the limited understanding of drug exposure in this species hampers its implementation in translational research. Using paracetamol as a paradigm compound, we present a novel method to characterize pharmacokinetic processes in zebrafish larvae, by combining sensitive bioanalytical methods and nonlinear mixed effects modeling. The developed method allowed quantification of paracetamol and its two major metabolites, paracetamol-sulfate and paracetamol-glucuronide in pooled samples of five lysed zebrafish larvae of 3 days post-fertilization. Paracetamol drug uptake was quantified to be 0.289 pmole/min and paracetamol clearance was quantified to be 1.7% of the total value of the larvae. With an average volume determined to be 0.290 μL, this yields an absolute clearance of 2.96 × 10 L/h, which scales reasonably well with clearance rates in higher vertebrates. The developed methodology will improve the success rate of drug screens in zebrafish larvae and the translation potential of findings, by allowing the establishment of accurate exposure profiles and thereby also the establishment of concentration-effect relationships.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/zeb.2016.1313DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5124745PMC
December 2016

Cardiovascular drug determination in bioanalysis: an update.

Bioanalysis 2015 Sep 23;7(18):2399-2417. Epub 2015 Sep 23.

Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Science & Technology, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), 48080 Bilbao, Basque Country, Spain.

The great impact of cardiovascular diseases in human health has led to the development of a huge number of drugs and therapies to improve the treatment of these diseases. Cardiovascular drug analysis in biological fluids constitutes an important challenge for analytical scientists. There is a clear need for reliable methods to carry out both qualitative and quantitative analysis in a short time of analysis. Different problems such as drug monitoring, analysis of metabolites, study of drugs interactions, drugs residues or degradation products, chiral separation, and screening and confirmation of drugs of abuse in doping control must be solved. New trends in sample preparation, instrumental and column technology advances in LC and innovations in MS are described in this work.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4155/bio.15.163DOI Listing
September 2015

Matrix Effect Compensation in Small-Molecule Profiling for an LC-TOF Platform Using Multicomponent Postcolumn Infusion.

Anal Chem 2015 Jun 27;87(12):5921-9. Epub 2015 May 27.

†Division of Analytical Biosciences, Leiden Academic Centre for Drug Research, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333CC Leiden, The Netherlands.

The possible presence of matrix effect is one of the main concerns in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-driven bioanalysis due to its impact on the reliability of the obtained quantitative results. Here we propose an approach to correct for the matrix effect in LC-MS with electrospray ionization using postcolumn infusion of eight internal standards (PCI-IS). We applied this approach to a generic ultraperformance liquid chromatography-time-of-flight (UHPLC-TOF) platform developed for small-molecule profiling with a main focus on drugs. Different urine samples were spiked with 19 drugs with different physicochemical properties and analyzed in order to study matrix effect (in absolute and relative terms). Furthermore, calibration curves for each analyte were constructed and quality control samples at different concentration levels were analyzed to check the applicability of this approach in quantitative analysis. The matrix effect profiles of the PCI-ISs were different: this confirms that the matrix effect is compound-dependent, and therefore the most suitable PCI-IS has to be chosen for each analyte. Chromatograms were reconstructed using analyte and PCI-IS responses, which were used to develop an optimized method which compensates for variation in ionization efficiency. The approach presented here improved the results in terms of matrix effect dramatically. Furthermore, calibration curves of higher quality are obtained, dynamic range is enhanced, and accuracy and precision of QC samples is increased. The use of PCI-ISs is a very promising step toward an analytical platform free of matrix effect, which can make LC-MS analysis even more successful, adding a higher reliability in quantification to its intrinsic high sensitivity and selectivity.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ac504268yDOI Listing
June 2015

Evaluation of human plasma sample preparation protocols for untargeted metabolic profiles analyzed by UHPLC-ESI-TOF-MS.

Anal Bioanal Chem 2014 Nov 12;406(29):7641-52. Epub 2014 Oct 12.

Analytical Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Basque Country/EHU, P.O. Box 644, 48080, Bilbao, Spain,

Eight human plasma preparation protocols were evaluated for their suitability for metabolomic studies by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry: organic solvent protein precipitation (PPT) with either methanol or acetonitrile in 2:1 and 3:1 (v/v) ratios with plasma; solid-phase extraction (SPE) using C18 or HybridSPE cartridges; and a combination of PPT and SPE C18 cartridges and microextraction by packed sorbent. A study design in which the order of injection of the samples was not randomized is presented. The analyses were conducted in a BEH C18 column (1.7 μm, 2.1 mm × 100 mm) using a linear gradient from 100% water to 100% methanol, both with 0.1% formic acid, in 21 min. The most reproducible protocol considering both the univariate and the multivariate analysis results was PPT with acetonitrile in a 2:1 (v/v) ratio with plasma, offering a mean coefficient of variation of the area of all the detected features of 0.15 and one of the best clusterings in the principal component analysis plots. On the other hand, the highest number of extracted features was achieved using methanol in a 2:1 (v/v) ratio with plasma as the PPT solvent, closely followed by the same protocol with acetonitrile in a 2:1 (v/v) ratio with plasma, which offered only 1.2% fewer repeatable features. In terms of concentration of remaining protein, protocols based on PPT with acetonitrile provided cleaner extracts than protocols based on PPT with methanol. Finally, pairwise comparison showed that the use of PPT- and SPE-based protocols offers a different coverage of the metabolome.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00216-014-8212-yDOI Listing
November 2014

Bioanalytical chromatographic method validation according to current regulations, with a special focus on the non-well defined parameters limit of quantification, robustness and matrix effect.

J Chromatogr A 2014 Aug 4;1353:10-27. Epub 2014 Apr 4.

Analytical Chemistry Department, Science and Technology Faculty, the Basque Country University/EHU, P.O. Box 644, Bilbao, Basque Country 48080, Spain. Electronic address:

Method validation is a mandatory step in bioanalysis, to evaluate the ability of developed methods in providing reliable results for their routine application. Even if some organisations have developed guidelines to define the different parameters to be included in method validation (FDA, EMA); there are still some ambiguous concepts in validation criteria and methodology that need to be clarified. The methodology to calculate fundamental parameters such as the limit of quantification has been defined in several ways without reaching a harmonised definition, which can lead to very different values depending on the applied criterion. Other parameters such as robustness or ruggedness are usually omitted and when defined there is not an established approach to evaluate them. Especially significant is the case of the matrix effect evaluation which is one of the most critical points to be studied in LC-MS methods but has been traditionally overlooked. Due to the increasing importance of bioanalysis this scenario is no longer acceptable and harmonised criteria involving all the concerned parties should be arisen. The objective of this review is thus to discuss and highlight several essential aspects of method validation, focused in bioanalysis. The overall validation process including common validation parameters (selectivity, linearity range, precision, accuracy, stability…) will be reviewed. Furthermore, the most controversial parameters (limit of quantification, robustness and matrix effect) will be carefully studied and the definitions and methodology proposed by the different regulatory bodies will be compared. This review aims to clarify the methodology to be followed in bioanalytical method validation, facilitating this time consuming step.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chroma.2014.03.077DOI Listing
August 2014

Development of an LC-MS/MS method for the quantitation of 55 compounds prescribed in combined cardiovascular therapy.

J Chromatogr B Analyt Technol Biomed Life Sci 2011 Feb 15;879(3-4):243-52. Epub 2010 Dec 15.

Analytical Chemistry Department, Science and Technology Faculty Leioa, Spain.

This paper reports an LC-MS/MS method with positive electrospray ionization for the screening of commonly prescribed cardiovascular drugs in human plasma, including compounds with antihypertensive (57), antidiabetic (12), hypolipemiant (5), anticoagulant (2) and platelet anti-aggregation (2) effects. Sample treatment consisted of a simple protein precipitation with MeOH/0.1 M ZnSO₄ (4:1, v/v) solution after the addition of internal standard, followed by evaporation and reconstitution. Analytes separation was performed on a Polar-RP column (150 m x 2 mm, 4 μm) using a gradient elution of 15 min. The MS system was operated in MRM mode, monitoring one quantitation and one confirmation transition for each analyte. The recovery of the protein precipitation step ranged from 50 to 70% for most of the compounds, while some were considerably affected by matrix effects. Since several analytes fulfilled the linearity, accuracy and precision values required by the ICH guidelines, the method proved to be suitable for their quantitative analysis. The limits of quantitation varied from 0.38 to 9.1 μg/L and the limits of detection from 0.12 to 5.34 μg/L. The method showed to be suitable for the detection of plasma samples of patients under cardiovascular treatment with the studied drugs, and for 55 compounds reliable quantitative results could be obtained.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jchromb.2010.12.007DOI Listing
February 2011

LC-MS/MS method for the determination of several drugs used in combined cardiovascular therapy in human plasma.

J Chromatogr B Analyt Technol Biomed Life Sci 2010 Oct 6;878(28):2685-92. Epub 2010 Aug 6.

Analytical Chemistry Department, Science and Technology Faculty, Basque Country University/EHU, P.O. Box 644, 48080 Bilbao, Basque Country, Spain.

A simple, fast and validated method is reported for the simultaneous analysis, in human plasma, of several drugs usually combined in cardiovascular therapy (atenolol, bisoprolol, hydrochlorothiazide, chlorthalidone, salicylic acid, enalapril and its active metabolite enalaprilat, valsartan and fluvastatin) using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with electrospray ionization (ESI), working in multiple reaction monitoring mode (MRM). Separation of analytes and internal standard (pravastatin) was performed on a Luna C18(2) (150mm×4.6mm, 3μm) column using a gradient elution mode with a run time of 15min. The mobile phase consisted of a mixture of acetonitrile and water containing 0.01% formic acid and 10mM ammonium formate at pH 4.1. Sample treatment consisted of a simple protein precipitation with acetonitrile, enabling a fast analysis. The method showed good linearity, precision (RSD% values between 0.7% and 12.7%) and accuracy (relative error values between 0.9% and 14.0%). Recoveries were within 68-106% range and the ion-suppression was not higher than 22% for any analyte. The method was successfully applied to plasma samples obtained from patients under combined cardiovascular treatment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jchromb.2010.07.026DOI Listing
October 2010

Validation of a fast liquid chromatography-UV method for the analysis of drugs used in combined cardiovascular therapy in human plasma.

J Chromatogr B Analyt Technol Biomed Life Sci 2009 Oct 19;877(27):3045-53. Epub 2009 Jul 19.

Pintura Saila, Arte Ederretako Fakultatea, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea/UPV, P.K. 644, 48080 Bilbo, Basque Country, Spain.

Ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) was investigated as a faster alternative to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for the simultaneous analysis of drugs usually prescribed in cardiovascular therapy. Upon a previously developed and validated solid phase extraction (SPE)-HPLC-photodiode array (PDA)-fluorescence (FLR) method, separation of chlorthalidone (CLTD; diuretic), valsartan and its metabolite (VAL and VAL-M1 respectively; angiotensin II receptor antagonist drugs) and fluvastatin (FLUV; statin) was performed in human plasma using an RP C18 column (50mmx2.1mm, 1.7microm, Waters Acquity UPLC (BEH)) and a tunable UV-vis (TUV) detector. After method transfer, different system variables were modulated to study the evolution of responses of the analytes and the endogenous interferences. The improved method was fully validated and the results were compared with its precursor HPLC method relating to analysis time, efficiency and sensitivity. The studied compounds were separated in less than 8min and the method showed good linearity (20-3000microg/L for chlorthalidone, 110-1100microg/L for valsartan-M1, 67-1900microg/L for valsartan and 48-1100microg/L for fluvastatin), precision and accuracy. The proposed method was found to be reproducible (RSD<10%), accurate (RE<15%), robust and suitable for quantitative analysis of the studied drugs in plasma obtained from patients under combined cardiovascular treatment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jchromb.2009.07.018DOI Listing
October 2009

Optimization and validation of a SPE-HPLC-PDA-fluorescence method for the simultaneous determination of drugs used in combined cardiovascular therapy in human plasma.

J Pharm Biomed Anal 2009 Nov 5;50(4):630-9. Epub 2008 Nov 5.

Kimika Analitikoa Saila, Zientzia eta Teknologia Fakultatea, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea/UPV, P.K. 644, 48080 Bilbo, Basque Country, Spain.

This paper reports the chemometrical optimization and the validation of a quantitative high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array-fluorescence (HPLC-PDA-Fluo) method for the simultaneous analysis, in human plasma, of drugs usually combined in cardiovascular therapy. Separation of chlorthalidone (CLTD), valsartan (VAL), valsartan-M1 (VAL-M1), fluvastatin (FLUV) and the internal standard (IS) candesartan cilexetil was performed on a dC18 Atlantis column (100 mm x 3.9 mm, 3 microm) using a gradient with a run time of 15 min. The mobile phase consisted of a mixture of acetonitrile and water containing 0.01% of formic acid and 10 mM of ammonium formate at pH 4.1. UV and fluorimetric (valsartan, its metabolite and fluvastatin) detectors were used. The sample preparation consisted of protein precipitation using acetonitrile suited to a solid-phase extraction (SPE) on a Strata-X cartridge for sample clean-up. Method validation was developed following the recommendations for bioanalytical method validation of International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) organizations. The method showed good linearity (31-3000 microg/l for chlorthalidone, 20-1000 microg/l for valsartan-M1, 10-5000 microg/l for valsartan and 14-1000 microg/l for fluvastatin), precision and accuracy. Recoveries were in the range of 78-91%. This method allowed the determination of these drugs in human plasma samples obtained from patients under cardiovascular treatment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpba.2008.10.037DOI Listing
November 2009