Publications by authors named "Oriana Motta"

25 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Semen quality as a potential susceptibility indicator to SARS-CoV-2 insults in polluted areas.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2021 May 29. Epub 2021 May 29.

Department of Biology, University of Naples Federico II, Via Cinthia 21, 80126, Napoli, Italy.

The epidemic of the new severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has impacted worldwide with its infectious spread and mortality rate. Thousands of articles have been published to tackle this crisis and many of these have indicated that high air pollution levels may be a contributing factor to high outbreak rates of COVID-19. Atmospheric pollutants, indeed, producing oxidative stress, inflammation, immuno-unbalance, and systemic coagulation, may be a possible significant co-factor of further damage, rendering the body prone to infections by a variety of pathogens, including viruses. Spermatozoa are extremely responsive to prooxidative effects produced by environmental pollutants and may serve as a powerful alert that signals the extent that environmental pressure, in a specific area, is doing damage to humans. In order to improve our current knowledge on this topic, this review article summarizes the relevant current observations emphasizing the weight that environmental pollution has on the sensitivity of a given population to several diseases and how semen quality, may be a potential indicator of sensitivity for virus insults (including SARS-CoV-2) in high polluted areas, and help to predict the risk for harmful effects of the SARS-CoV-2 epidemic. In addition, this review focused on the potential routes of virus transmission that may represent a population health risk and also identified the areas of critical importance that require urgent research to assess and manage the COVID-19 outbreak.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-021-14579-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8164491PMC
May 2021

Chemical risk in hospital settings: Overview on monitoring strategies and international regulatory aspects.

J Public Health Res 2021 Mar 24;10(1). Epub 2021 Mar 24.

Department of Medicine, Surgery and Dentistry "Scuola Medica Salernitana", University of Salerno, Baronissi (SA).

Chemical risk in hospital settings is a growing concern that health professionals and supervisory authorities must deal with daily. Exposure to chemical risk is quite different depending on the hospital department involved and might origin from multiple sources, such as the use of sterilizing agents, disinfectants, detergents, solvents, heavy metals, dangerous drugs, and anesthetic gases. Improving prevention procedures and constantly monitoring the presence and level of potentially toxic substances, both in workers (biological monitoring) and in working environments (environmental monitoring), might significantly reduce the risk of exposure and contaminations. The purpose of this article is to present an overview on this subject, which includes the current international regulations, the chemical pollutants to which medical and paramedical personnel are mainly exposed, and the strategies developed to improve safety conditions for all healthcare workers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4081/jphr.2021.1993DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8018262PMC
March 2021

Environmental and biological monitoring of formaldehyde inside a hospital setting: a combined approach to manage chemical risk in workplaces.

J Public Health Res 2021 Mar 10;10(1). Epub 2021 Mar 10.

Department of Medicine, Surgery and Dentistry "Scuola Medica Salernitana", University of Salerno, Baronissi .

Background: The safety of healthcare workers exposed to formaldehyde remains a great matter of concern for healthcare management units. This work aimed at describing the results of a combined monitoring approach (environmental and biological) to manage occupational exposure to formaldehyde in a hospital setting.

Design And Methods: Environmental monitoring of working spaces and biological monitoring of urinary formaldehyde in 16 exposed healthcare workers of the Anatomic Pathology Unit of a University Hospital in Southern Italy was performed on a four-year timescale (2016-2019).

Results: Values of aero-dispersed formaldehyde identified were on average low; although workers' urinary formaldehyde levels were also minimal, the statistical analysis highlighted a slight weekly accumulation.

Conclusions: Our data confirm that both environmental and biological monitoring are important to identify risk situations, in particular when values of hazardous compounds are below the accepted occupational exposure levels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4081/jphr.2021.2012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7967491PMC
March 2021

Leonardo da Vinci's "Last Supper": a case study to evaluate the influence of visitors on the Museum preservation systems.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2021 Apr 4. Epub 2021 Apr 4.

Department of Chemistry and Biology, University of Salerno, via Giovanni Paolo II 132, 84084, Fisciano, Salerno, Italy.

The most important parameter to obtain an appropriate preservation condition of museum environments concerns the indoor air quality. The exposure of artwork and materials to gaseous and particulate pollutants introduced by visitors and either indoor or outdoor sources contributes to their decay. In this work, we evaluated the possible monitoring of the visitors' influence using the stable carbon isotopic ratio of CO and the concentration of NH as a real-time tool. The study was done in the Refectory of Santa Maria delle Grazie (Milan, Italy) which houses one of the most important paintings of Leonardo da Vinci, the Last Supper, and had more than 400,000 visitors in 2019. The results confirmed a good correlation between the presence of tourists inside the museum and the variation of δC value during the visits and the closure of the museum. The variation of indoor atmospheric δC was influenced by the presence of visitors in the Refectory and delineates the way done from the entrance to the exit. In the same way, the concentration of NH was influenced by the presence of visitors and confirmed the role of this one on preservation methodology for indoor air quality in the museum. This new methodology can be used as a supplemental and non-invasive tool to help in calibrating microclimatic conditions through the ventilation rate and air filtration systems in the museum and to manage the number of visitors per turn.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-021-13741-9DOI Listing
April 2021

[Effect of lockdown for COVID-19 on aerodiffusive disease reduction, such as measles].

Epidemiol Prev 2020 Sep-Dec;44(5-6):318-320

Dipartimento di medicina, chirurgia e odontoiatria "Scuola Medica Salernitana", Università di Salerno, Baronissi (SA).

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http://dx.doi.org/10.19191/EP20.5-6.P318.004DOI Listing
April 2021

The misperception of the use of ozone in the sanitation processes.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2021 Apr 19;28(16):19537-19538. Epub 2021 Feb 19.

Department of Medicine Surgery and Dentistry "Scuola Medica Salernitana", University of Salerno, via S. Allende 1, 84081, Baronissi, (SA), Italy.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-021-12994-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7893376PMC
April 2021

Effect of the aqueous matrix on the inactivation of E. coli by permaleic acid.

Sci Total Environ 2021 May 29;767:144395. Epub 2020 Dec 29.

Department of Chemistry and Biology, University of Salerno, via Giovanni Paolo II 132, 84084 Fisciano, SA, Italy.

In this work permaleic acid (PMA) was investigated as possible disinfecting agent and compared to peracetic acid (PAA) in real tap water and wastewater. Preliminary tests in lysogeny broth (LB) were also performed. PMA was synthesized from maleic anhydride and hydrogen peroxide and, for the first time, its antimicrobial activity was evaluated with respect to the growth inhibition of E. coli. The effect of the pH and bivalent ions, typically occurring in real water matrices (namely, Mg and Ca), was also investigated. pKa values for PMA were calculated for the first time by DFT calculations. The concentration of bivalent ions strongly affected disinfection efficiency with PMA (Ca=0.33 mgL and Mg=0.35 mgL: 100% E. coli reduction > log 5; Ca=13.3 mg L and Mg=25.6 mg L: E. coli reduction < log 1, after 60 min), and such results were supported by DFT modelling outcomes (pKa of PMA 7.3) and disinfection tests in presence of EDTA chelating agent. More alkaline pH conditions drastically decreased PMA disinfection (pH = 5: > log 5 E.coli reduction; pH = 9: < log 1 E.coli reduction, after 60 min). PMA disinfection efficiency is strongly affected by the target water quality, the concentration of metal bivalent ions and the initial pH.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.144395DOI Listing
May 2021

New analytical approach to monitoring air quality in historical monuments through the isotopic ratio of CO.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2021 Jan 2. Epub 2021 Jan 2.

Department of Medicine Surgery and Dentistry, University of Salerno, via S. Allende, 84081, Baronissi, SA, Italy.

In this study, we evaluated indoor air quality to highlight the effects of environmental pollution in the field of cultural heritage. In particular, two important archeological places in the old part of the city of Salerno, Italy, were analyzed: Fruscione Palace and S. Pietro a Corte. The work focused on the influence of tourists on environmental pollution correlated to indoor air quality during some social and cultural events. Moreover, we focused on the possible use of the carbon isotopic composition of CO as a tool for environmental studies in the field of cultural heritage. The results showed a good relationship between the isotopic composition of CO and the variation of pollutants concentration in the air, demonstrating that it is a valid tool and non-invasive marker to monitor environmental pollution of museums and cultural heritage sites.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-020-12215-8DOI Listing
January 2021

An alternative approach for the decontamination of hospital settings.

J Infect Public Health 2020 Dec 21;13(12):2038-2044. Epub 2020 Oct 21.

Department of Medicine Surgery and Dentistry "Scuola Medica Salernitana", University of Salerno, via S. Allende 1, 84081 Baronissi, SA, Italy.

Background: The increasing emergence and spread of multiresistant microorganisms in hospital wards is a serious concern. Traditional protocols are often not sufficient to protect patients susceptible to serious and life-threatening infections, therefore new strategies for decontaminating hospital environments are crucial to reducing microbial transmission and the spread the nosocomial infections. The adoption of modern technologies is indicated to supplement traditional methods and to improve desired levels of surface disinfection.

Aim: This work aims to report the development, implementation, and validation of cleansing and sanitizing procedure for critical clinical settings through the innovative use of disposable cloths pre-impregnated with solutions containing different active formulations and biocidal agents, relating to the areas to be treated (low, moderate, high-risk).

Methods: The implementation and validation of the sanitizing system were conducted in different wards of two healthcare structures. The protocol for the study involved a structured selection of representative surfaces, such as the floor, bathroom, desk, and beds. Microbiological analyses were performed according to ISO 4833-1:2013.

Findings: The efficiency of the proposed system was measured through the estimation of total microbial count values on the different surfaces before and after the sanitization operations by traditional methods and by the system described here. The results demonstrated a significant reduction in the microbial count that always fell below the threshold value. For the analyzed surfaces such as shower tray, bathroom floor, toilet edge, the traditional system had an effectiveness of less than 10%, whereas pre-impregnated cloths succeed to eliminate about 90% of the bacteria present. As an example, on the floor we observed a microbial count reduction from >42 to 10CFU/11cm with the new method (76% of colonies were destroyed), while with the traditional one we have a reduction from >42 to 28CFU/11cm (33% of microbial colonies). Moreover, the advantages of using this sanitization system are not limited to disinfecting surfaces and limiting cross-contamination but involve all activities related to the cleaning and disinfection operations, including the training and education of the operators and traceability of the operations.

Conclusions: The innovative disinfection and cleaning protocol used in the present study proved to be a highly valuable alternative to the traditional cleaning procedures in healthcare settings for the sanitizing process of all kinds of surfaces. All tools were specifically designed to improve disinfection efficiency and to reduce the problems associated with traditional methods, such as preventing cross-contamination events, limiting the physical efforts of operators, and avoiding incorrect practices. Our findings add support to the knowledge that an effective sanitization procedure is critical in minimizing microorganisms' transmission and cross-contamination.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jiph.2020.09.020DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7577675PMC
December 2020

Sepsis-A Retrospective Cohort Study of Bloodstream Infections.

Antibiotics (Basel) 2020 Nov 28;9(12). Epub 2020 Nov 28.

Dai Dipartimento Di Igiene Sanitaria e Medicina Valutativa U.O.C. Patologia Clinica E Microbiologica, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria S. Giovanni di Dio e Ruggi D'Aragona Scuola Medica Salernitana, Largo Città di Ippocrate, 84131 Salerno, Italy.

Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, among infectious diseases. Local knowledge of the main bacteria involved in BSIs and their associated antibiotic susceptibility patterns is essential to rationalize the empiric antimicrobial therapy. The aim of this study was to define the incidence of infection and evaluate the antimicrobial resistance profile of the main pathogens involved in BSIs. This study enrolled patients of all ages and both sexes admitted to the University Hospital "San Giovanni di Dio e Ruggi d'Aragona", Salerno, Italy between January 2015 to December 2019. Bacterial identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing were performed with Vitek 2. A number of 3.949 positive blood cultures were included out of 24,694 total blood cultures from 2015 to 2019. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) were identified as the main bacteria that caused BSI (17.4%), followed by (12.3%), (10.9%), and (9.4%). Gram-positive bacteria were highly resistant to Penicillin G and Oxacillin, while Gram-negative strains to Ciprofloxacin, Cefotaxime, Ceftazidime, and Amoxicillin-clavulanate. High susceptibility to Vancomycin, Linezolid, and Daptomycin was observed among Gram-positive strains. Fosfomycin showed the best performance to treatment Gram-negative BSIs. Our study found an increase in resistance to the latest generation of antibiotics over the years. This suggests an urgent need to improve antimicrobial management programs to optimize empirical therapy in BSI.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics9120851DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7760988PMC
November 2020

Development and Improvement of an Effective Method for Air and Surfaces Disinfection with Ozone Gas as a Decontaminating Agent.

Medicina (Kaunas) 2020 Oct 30;56(11). Epub 2020 Oct 30.

Department of Medicine Surgery and Dentistry "Scuola Medica Salernitana", University of Salerno, via S. Allende 1, 84081 Baronissi (SA), Italy.

Ozone has been one of the most investigated and discussed sanitization methods. This paper reports a procedure to sanitize air hospital environments, in particular chirurgical surgery rooms that require high levels of disinfection. The purpose of this work was the development and implementation of a cleansing and sanitizing procedure for critical clinical settings with ozone, to prevent hospital infections by the elimination of all toxic and harmful microorganisms in the air, and ensure safe use for operators and patients. The protocol for the study involved a structured selection of a representative environment of healthcare structures such as high, medium, and low-risk settings in air and examples of hospital furniture. The concentration of ozone was measured during sanitization treatment and the estimation of the total microbial count in the air and on different surfaces before and after the sanitization operations was performed. The results demonstrated a significant reduction in the microbial count that always fell below the threshold value. Currently, there are no air treatment strategies available for inactivating airborne organisms during hospital outbreaks, which is most probably due to the lack of approved protocols.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/medicina56110578DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7694113PMC
October 2020

Characterization and authentication of commercial cleaning products formulated with biobased surfactants by stable carbon isotope ratio.

Talanta 2020 Nov 27;219:121256. Epub 2020 Jun 27.

Department of Chemistry and Biology, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II 132, 84084, Fisciano, SA, Italy.

This study focuses on the application of stable carbon isotope analysis to determine the origin of commercial surfactants and cleaning products, especially used in quality process by chemical companies. The δC value was applied to commercial surfactants, such as ethoxylate alcohol, sodium lauryl sulfate, alkyl polyglucoside with different origin, that are the most common raw materials used in cleaning products. In this study, the isotopic analysis was performed on mixtures of commercial surfactants to simulate the commercial detergent formulations (handwashing, multisurface cleaner and degreaser) and then on bulk professional cleaning products to match relationship between isotope carbon composition and concentration of surfactants in real samples. This study demonstrated that δC was correlated to the origin of surfactants. In particular we analyzed five samples of biobased surfactants, with δC value from -22,6‰ to -28,0‰, and six samples from carbon fossil raw material, with δC value from -28,5‰ to -32,0‰, which were the most common raw material used in commercial cleaning products. Isotope carbon composition was also applied on mixtures of biobased and fossil surfactants to simulate and perform the method for stable carbon isotope analysis of commercial cleaning products. Furthemore the results assessed the relationship between stable carbon isotope ratio values and surfactant concentration in mixtures: for example in 50% mixtures of biobased (δC -22,6‰) and synthetic surfactant (δC -32,5‰), we found a δC value -28,00‰. The main advantage in using δC analysis is related to cheapness and easy-to-operate method in comparison to radiocarbon methodology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.talanta.2020.121256DOI Listing
November 2020

From Cyclic Peptoids to Peraza-macrocycles: A General Reductive Approach.

Org Lett 2019 09 30;21(18):7365-7369. Epub 2019 Aug 30.

Department of Chemistry and Biology "A. Zambelli" , University of Salerno , via Giovanni Paolo II, 132 , Fisciano ( SA ), 84084 , Italy.

Peraza-macrocycles form chelates of high thermodynamic and kinetic stability useful in diagnostic imaging (MRI, SPECT, PET), in coordination chemistry, and as catalysts. In this letter, we report an advantageous method to prepare these compounds via BH-induced reduction of cyclic peptoids. Using this procedure, 10 homo- and heterosubstituted aza-coronands, with different sizes and side chains, have been synthesized from the corresponding cyclic oligoamides. Solid structures of free, protonated, and Na coordinated polyaza-derivatives have been disclosed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.orglett.9b02668DOI Listing
September 2019

A new strategy to control the proliferation of microorganisms in solid hospital waste and the diffusion of nosocomial infections.

Infez Med 2018 Sep;26(3):210-215

Department of Medicine, Surgery and Dentistry "Scuola Medica Salernitana", University of Salerno, Salerno, Italy.

A possible tool to reduce nosocomial infections is to identify unknown sources of contamination and then to provide a measure for controlling the related infections. In this study, solid hospital waste was considered a potential source of contamination, and a strategy to reduce the potential risk of pathogen contamination was tested. This paper describes a novel technique for waste management in healthcare settings with a view to facilitating infection prevention and control. We explored the innovative use of sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) by investigating the microbicidal activity of chlorine, which derives from the hydrolysis of NaDCC mediated by humidity, and by testing its effect on the inhibition of microorganism growth. NaDCC was inserted in a solid hospital waste bin containing also Lauria-Bertani agar plates, with different dilutions of a known titre of three different microorganisms, namely Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Aspergillus brasiliensis. The plates were incubated in the container with or without the antimicrobial agent (control, CNT) at room temperature for 5 days. The number of colony-forming units (CFUs) present on each plate was then counted. Microorganisms capable of proliferating in the CNT waste bin were not able to grow in the presence of NaDCC. Furthermore, the molecular chlorine which developed and was released in the waste bin under the experimental conditions (T=20°C, t=5 days) was quantified using iodometric titration. NaDCC hydrolysis, mediated by humidity, has a strong and long-lasting microbicide effect. The proliferation of tested bacteria and fungi is totally inhibited. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of NaDCC in controlling and/or inhibiting microbial proliferation and support its possible use in the treatment of hospital waste to control the spread of nosocomial contamination.
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September 2018

Development of a new radial passive sampling device for atmospheric NO determination.

Talanta 2018 Dec 1;190:199-203. Epub 2018 Aug 1.

Dipartimento di Chimica e Biologia, Università degli Studi di Salerno, via Giovanni Paolo II, 132-84084 Fisciano, SA, Italy.

In this paper we used NaCO-impregnated silica as reactive substrate for the determination of atmospheric NO (NO+NO) by using a passive sampling device, with radial symmetry, which is unprecedented. We conducted laboratory and field tests at an urban setting, with co-located passive samplers and continuous measurements of NO by a chemiluminescence detector, used as reference. The performance of the carbonate-based sorbent for the NO sampler was evaluated in two different time frames (autumn 2016 and winter 2017), characterised by different environmental conditions. The comparison of the NO concentration levels measured by passive sampling, using NaCO as NO sorbent, showed a close relationship with those obtained by the chemiluminescence analyzer. Validation experiments in the laboratory and in the field are reported together with the calculation of the diffusion-sampling rate of the samplers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.talanta.2018.07.088DOI Listing
December 2018

Determination of the C/C Carbon Isotope Ratio in Carbonates and Bicarbonates by C NMR Spectroscopy.

Anal Chem 2017 Nov 9;89(21):11413-11418. Epub 2017 Oct 9.

Department of Chemistry and Biology, University of Salerno , via Giovanni Paolo II 132, 84084 Fisciano (SA), Italy.

This paper is the first study focused on the innovative application of C NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy to determine the bulk C/C carbon isotope ratio, at natural abundance, in inorganic carbonates and bicarbonates. In the past, C NMR spectroscopy (irm-C NMR) was mainly used to measure isotope ratio monitoring with the potential of conducting C position-specific isotope analysis of organic molecules with high precision. The reliability of the newly developed methodology for the determination of stable carbon isotope ratio was evaluated in comparison with the method chosen in the past for these measurements, i.e., isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), with very encouraging results. We determined the C/C ratio of carbonates and bicarbonates (∼50-100 mg) with a precision on the order of 1‰ in the presence of a relaxation agent, such as Cr(acac), and CHCOONa as an internal standard. The method was first applied to soluble inorganic carbonates and bicarbonates and then extended to insoluble carbonates by converting them to NaCO, following a simple procedure and without observing isotopic fractionation. Here, we demonstrate that C NMR spectroscopy can also be successfully adopted to characterize the C/C isotope ratio in inorganic carbonates and bicarbonates with applications in different fields, such as cultural heritage and geological studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.analchem.7b02473DOI Listing
November 2017

A new sorbent tube for atmospheric NO determination by active sampling.

Talanta 2017 Mar 6;164:403-406. Epub 2016 Dec 6.

Dipartimento di Medicina Chirurgia e Odontoiatria "Scuola Medica Salernitana", Università degli Studi di Salerno, via Salvatore Allende, 84081 Baronissi, SA, Italy.

In this paper we used hydrated mayenite as reactive substrate for NO active sampling in the air, which is novel. The performance of the mayenite-based sorbent for the NO tubes was evaluated in two different monitoring surveys (autumn 2015 and winter 2016), characterized by different environmental conditions. Sorbent tubes filled with mayenite were exposed simultaneously to triethanolamine (TEA)-based sorbent tubes and to a chemiluminescence detector, as reference. The comparison of the NO concentration levels measured by active sampling, using mayenite as NO sorbent, showed a close relationship with the chemiluminescence analyzer. The effect of the environmental conditions on the performance of both mayenite and TEA-based sorbent tubes was evaluated and limitations connected to the use of TEA were discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.talanta.2016.12.006DOI Listing
March 2017

FTIR and NDIR spectroscopies as valuable alternatives to IRMS spectrometry for the δ(13)C analysis of food.

Talanta 2016 Nov 25;160:276-281. Epub 2016 Jun 25.

Department of Medicine, Surgery and Dentistry "Scoula Medica Salernitana", University of Salerno, via S. Allende, Baronissi, SA, 84081 Italy.

The (13)C/(12)C carbon isotope ratio is a chemical parameter with many important applications in several scientific area and the technique of choice currently used for the δ(13)C determination is the isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). This latter is highly accurate (0.1‰) and sensitive (up to 0.01‰), but at the same time expensive and complex. The objective of this work was to assess the reliability of FTIR and NDIRS techniques for the measurement of carbon stable isotope ratio of food sample, in comparison to IRMS. IRMS, NDIRS and FTIR were used to analyze samples of food, such as oil, durum, cocoa, pasta and sugar, in order to determine the natural abundance isotopic ratio of carbon in a parallel way. The results were comparable, showing a close relationship among the three techniques. The main advantage in using FTIR and NDIRS is related to their cheapness and easy-to-operate in comparison to IRMS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.talanta.2016.06.053DOI Listing
November 2016

Bactericidal and Fungicidal Activity in the Gas Phase of Sodium Dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC).

Curr Microbiol 2016 Aug 16;73(2):287-91. Epub 2016 Apr 16.

Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Salerno, Via S. Allende, 84081, Baronissi, SA, Italy.

Sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) is usually employed as a disinfectant for the treatment of water, environmental surfaces and medical equipment principally for its effectiveness as a microbicide agent. In this study, we explore the possibility of a new use for NaDCC by investigating the microbicidal activity of chlorine, which derives from the hydrolysis of NaDCC mediated by air humidity, and by testing its effect on the neutralization of microbes present in domestic waste. NaDCC was inserted in a plastic garbage can where LB agar plates, with different dilutions of a known title of four different microorganisms (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Debaryomyces hansenii and Aspergillus brasiliensis), were weakly inserted. The molecular chlorine (Cl2) levels present in the garbage can were quantified using an iodometric titration. The gas emitted in the garbage can presented a strong microbicide effect, inhibiting the proliferation of all four microorganisms and for four consecutive weeks, thus showing that NaDCC hydrolysis, mediated by air humidity, is able to ensure the decontamination of restricted environments, avoiding the proliferation of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as fungi.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00284-016-1040-xDOI Listing
August 2016

A study on the applicability of zinc acetate impregnated silica substrate in the collection of hydrogen sulfide by active sampling.

Talanta 2014 Oct 14;128:268-72. Epub 2014 May 14.

Department of Chemistry and Biology, University of Salerno, via Giovanni Paolo II 132, 84084 Fisciano (SA), Italy. Electronic address:

A novel substrate for the hydrogen sulfide determination in air was developed based on zinc acetate impregnated silica in glass tubes. Collected H2S is quantified by ion chromatography after sulfide oxidation to sulfate in an alkaline solution of H2O2. Laboratory tests were conducted in controlled atmosphere to evaluate uptake rate, linearity, sample stability, influence of relative humidity and interfering gases. A pilot study was also conducted in the field in order to assess the applicability of the substrate and to understand the effect that gases such NO2 and CH4 can have on the efficiency of collection of H2S. The new substrate has shown to have several advantages with respect to the charcoal substrate, that is the one of choice as reported by National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) method. In particular it does not suffer from sulfur background and it is not influenced by interfering gases such as NO2 and CH4.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.talanta.2014.04.031DOI Listing
October 2014

Stable carbon isotope ratio in atmospheric CO2 collected by new diffusive devices.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2014 Feb 27;21(4):3182-6. Epub 2013 Nov 27.

Department of Chemistry and Biology, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132, 84084, Fisciano, Salerno, Italy,

In this paper, stable carbon isotope ratios (δ (13)C) were determined in the atmosphere by using a Ca-based sorbent, CaO/Ca12Al14O33 75:25 w/w, for passively collecting atmospheric CO2, in both field and laboratory experiments. Field measurements were conducted in three environments characterized by different carbon dioxide sources. In particular, the environments under consideration were a rather heavily trafficked road, where the source of CO2 is mostly vehicle exhaust, a rural unpolluted area, and a private kitchen where the major source of CO2 was gas combustion. Samplers were exposed to the free atmosphere for 3 days in order to allow collection of sufficient CO2 for δ(13)C analysis, then the collected CO2 was desorbed from the adsorbent with acid treatment, and directly analyzed by nondispersive infrared (NDIR) instrument. δ (13)C results confirmed that the samplers collected representative CO2 samples and no fractionation occurred during passive trapping, as also confirmed by an appositely designed experiment conducted in the laboratory. Passive sampling using CaO/Ca12Al14O33 75:25 w/w proved to be an easy and reliable method to collect atmospheric carbon dioxide for δ (13)C analysis in both indoor and outdoor places.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-013-2369-3DOI Listing
February 2014

Assessment of perchlorate-reducing bacteria in a highly polluted river.

Int J Hyg Environ Health 2010 Nov 16;213(6):437-43. Epub 2010 Sep 16.

Department of Chemistry, University of Salerno, via Ponte don Melillo, 84084 Fisciano, SA, Italy.

A 1-year monitoring experiment of the Sarno River basin was conducted during 2008 to evaluate the overall quality of the water over time and to compare the results with those obtained previously. The physico-chemical and microbiological characteristics of the water course had not changed appreciably with respect to previous determinations, thus emphasizing the major contribution of untreated urban wastewater to the overall pollution of the river. Moreover, attention was paid to the perchlorate ion, one of the so-called emerging contaminants, which is widespread in natural environments and is known to have adverse effects on the human thyroid gland. Over the entire monitoring program, we did not find appreciable levels of perchlorate, although the particular environmental condition could support its development. Thus, a dedicated study was designed to assess the presence of bacteria that can reasonably reduce perchlorate levels. By enrichment and molecular procedures, we identified α- and β-Proteobacteria strains, classified by 16S rDNA sequences as Dechlorospirillum sp. and Dechlorosoma sp., respectively. Further physiologic characterization and the presence of the alpha subunit gene (pcrA) of the perchlorate reductase in both strains confirmed the presence in the river of viable and active perchlorate dissimilatory bacteria.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheh.2010.08.001DOI Listing
November 2010

New FTIR methodology for the evaluation of (13)C/(12)C isotope ratio in Helicobacter pylori infection diagnosis.

J Infect 2009 Aug 18;59(2):90-4. Epub 2009 Jun 18.

Department of Educational Science, University of Salerno, 84084 Fisciano (SA), Italy.

Objectives: The objective of this work was to assess the reliability of a newly developed FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy) technique for (13)C-urea breath test in the non-invasive diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection, in comparison to those currently used, isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) and non-dispersive isotope-selective infrared spectrometry (NDIRS). This new methodology is based on the use of a very less expensive and sophisticated FTIR than IRMS and NDIRS.

Materials And Methods: Sixty patients (male and female, aged between 15-70 years) with dyspeptic symptoms, like the epigastric pain, were tested for H. pylori infection using (13)C-urea breath test. Triplicate breath samples were collected before and 30 min after drinking the test solution (75 mg (13)C-urea dissolved in 200 ml 0.1M citric acid). Analysis of delta(13)C were conducted in parallel by means of IRMS, NDIRS and FTIR in order to compare the results.

Results: Delta-over-baseline values were over 5 per thousand in 18 patients, ranging from 8.81 to 60.88 per thousand for IRMS measurements, from 7.2 to 61.2 per thousand for NDIRS and from 7.7 to 61.2 per thousand for FTIR measurements. The remaining 42 subjects had values well below the 5 per thousand cut-off. The results of the baseline-corrected (13)CO(2) exhalation values between FTIR and IRMS/NDIRS were in good agreement.

Conclusions: The newly developed FTIR methodology has been demonstrated to be a reliable and accurate analytical tool, low cost and easy-to-operate, which permits a highly specific measurement of (13)C enrichment in breath samples. As IRMS and NDIRS it allows to adequately discriminate between infected and non-infected subjects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jinf.2009.06.006DOI Listing
August 2009

Utilization of chemically oxidized polystyrene as co-substrate by filamentous fungi.

Int J Hyg Environ Health 2009 Jan 28;212(1):61-6. Epub 2008 Jan 28.

Department of Educational Science, Chair of Hygiene, University of Salerno, via Ponte don Melillo, 84084 Fisciano (SA), Italy.

Atactic polystyrene, one of the most widely used chemical products, was subjected to novel chemically oxidative treatments able to trigger a great variety of physical and chemical changes in the polymer's chains. The oxidized polystyrene samples, when analyzed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) clearly showed the formation of carbonyl groups and hydroxyl groups, which increased with the increase in the strength of chemically oxidative treatments. In fungal degradation tests deploying Curvularia species, the fungus colonized the oxidized samples within 9 weeks. Colonization was confirmed by microscopic examination, which showed that the hyphae had adhered to and penetrated the polymer's structure in all the treated samples. Such colonization and adhesion by microorganisms are a fundamental prerequisite for biodegradation of polymers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheh.2007.09.014DOI Listing
January 2009

Determination of 13C/12C carbon isotope ratio.

Anal Chem 2006 May;78(9):3080-3

Department of Chemistry, via S. Allende 84081 Baronissi (SA), and Department of Educational Science, via P. Don Melillo 84084 Fisciano (SA), University of Salerno, Salerno, Italy.

Isotopomers 12CO2 and 13CO2 absorbed into polystyrene films provide narrow, sharp, and well-resolved IR absorption bands for the nu3 antisymmetric stretching mode. This is exploited to set up an inexpensive FT-IR-based method for the measurement of the carbon isotope ratio. Accuracy of 2.5 per thousand delta13C units is readily achieved already at a low resolution of 2 cm(-1).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ac0517038DOI Listing
May 2006