Publications by authors named "Omid Abazari"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Mechanisms of COVID-19 Entry into the Cell: Potential Therapeutic Approaches Based on Virus Entry Inhibition in COVID-19 Patients with Underlying Diseases.

Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2021 Feb 11;20(1):11-23. Epub 2021 Feb 11.

Department of Clinical Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol, Iran AND Cellular, and Molecular Biology Research Center, Health Research Institute, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol, Iran AND Department of Pathology, University of Kiel, Kiel, Germany.

The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) virus spread from Wuhan, China, in 2019 and is spreading rapidly around the world. COVID-19 victims are almost associated with cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, and other underlying diseases. Concerning the high prevalence of these disorders, widespread mortality threatens global society, and its fatality rate may increase with increasing COVID-19 prevalence in countries with older populations. Therefore, evaluating patients' clinical status with severe COVID-19 infection and their medical history can help manage treatment. Currently, one of the considered treatments is angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) inhibition. This study investigated virus entry mechanisms through membrane receptors, their role in the pathogenesis of COVID-19 and underlying diseases, and treatment methods based on the viral entrance inhibition. According to existing studies, inhibition of ACE2 can increase oxidative stress, inflammation, fibrosis and ultimately exacerbate underlying diseases such as cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, diabetes, and hypertension in individuals with COVID-19. The ACE2 inhibition is not suitable for patients with COVID-19 with underlying diseases, but it seems that the recombinant ACE2 solution is more appropriate for inhibiting the virus in these patients if hypotension would be monitored.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.18502/ijaai.v20i1.5409DOI Listing
February 2021

The benefits of Vitamin D in the COVID-19 pandemic: biochemical and immunological mechanisms.

Arch Physiol Biochem 2020 Oct 8:1-9. Epub 2020 Oct 8.

Department of Clinical Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol, Iran.

In December 2019, a new infectious complication called CoronaVirus Infectious Disease-19, briefly COVID-19, caused by SARS-COV-2, is identified in Wuhan, China. It spread all over the world and became a pandemic. In many individuals who had suffered SARS-COV-2 infection, cytokine storm starts through cytokine overproduction and leads to Acute Respiratory Syndrome (ARS), organ failure, and death. According to the obtained evidence, Vitamin D (VitD) enhances the ACE2/Ang(1-7)/MasR pathway activity, and it also reduces cytokine storms and the ARS risk. Therefore, VitD intake may be beneficial for patients with SARS-COV-2 infection exposed to cytokine storm but do not suffer hypotension. In the present review, we have explained the effects of VitD on the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) function and angiotensin-converting enzyme2 (ACE2) expression. Furthermore, we have reviewed the biochemical and immunological effects of VitD on immune function in the underlying diseases and its role in the COVID-19 pandemic.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13813455.2020.1826530DOI Listing
October 2020

In Vitro Effects of Curcumin on Transforming Growth Factor-β-mediated Non-Smad Signaling Pathway, Oxidative Stress, and Pro-inflammatory Cytokines Production with Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

Iran J Allergy Asthma Immunol 2020 Feb 1;19(1):84-93. Epub 2020 Feb 1.

Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences and Health Services, Yazd, Iran.

Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) induces pro-inflammatory cytokines expression including interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and these cytokines are associated with the development of atherosclerosis. Curcumin has anti-atherogenic effects and anti-inflammatory properties in the vascular wall, but the relative mechanisms are almost unknown. In the present study, we investigate the effect of curcumin on modulating the pro-inflammatory action of TGF-β in human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and its molecular mechanisms. Cultured VSMCs were seeded into several groups: a control group (untreated group), a group treated with TGF-β, and several groups treated with TGF-β plus inhibitors. The cells were pre-treated with diphenyleneiodonium chloride, DPI, (20 μM), curcumin (5, 10 and 20 μM) and N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine, NAC, (10 mM) and then TGF-β (5 ng/mL) was added to the culture medium. The mRNA levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were detected by quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction. For monitoring the Smad2 linker region phosphorylation (pSmad2L), the western-blotting technique was applied and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was measured by utilizing 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate-based assay. TGF-β increased the mRNA expression of IL-6 (p=0.02 and p=0.001) and TNF-α (p =0.014 and p = 0.001) in a time-dependent manner, ROS production (p=0.03) and Smad2L phosphorylation (p=0.015). Pre-treatment with curcumin, DPI and NAC inhibited TGF-β-induced IL-6 (p=0.04) and TNF-α (p=0.001) mRNA expression, Smad2L phosphorylation (p=0.02) and ROS production (0.03). Pharmacological inhibition by Curcumin blocks TGF-β-induced ROS production, Smad2L phosphorylation, and IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA expression in human VSMCs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.18502/ijaai.v19i1.2421DOI Listing
February 2020

Inhibitory effects of oxali-Platin as a chemotherapeutic drug on the function and structure of bovine liver catalase.

J Biomol Struct Dyn 2020 02 11;38(2):609-615. Epub 2019 Mar 11.

Department of Cell & Molecular Biology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Kharazmi University, Tehran, Iran.

Communicated by Ramaswamy H. Sarma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07391102.2019.1581088DOI Listing
February 2020

Effect of a Synthesized Amyl-Glycine1, 10-Phenanthroline Platinum Nitrate on Structure and Stability of Human Blood Carrier Protein, Albumin: Spectroscopic and Modeling Approaches.

J Fluoresc 2017 Sep 29;27(5):1829-1838. Epub 2017 May 29.

Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Basic Sciences, Jamia Millia Islamia (A Central University), Jamia Nagar, New Delhi, 110 025, India.

In the present study, biological evaluation of a new synthesized anti-cancer compound, amyl-glycine1, 10-phenanthroline Platinum nitrate (Pt(II) complex), was investigated at different temperatures by spectroscopic methods (far-UV circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence) and modeling methods (docking and FRET). Human serum albumin (HSA), one of the vital proteins in drug delivery system in the body, was used as a target protein. The Pt(II) complex is able to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA considerably. Binding and thermodynamic parameters of the interaction between the protein and the ligand were analyzed by fluorescence quenching method. The far-UV CD spectra revealed that the secondary structure of HSA did not show any noticeable change upon interaction with Pt(II) complex at both 25 and 37°C. The calculation of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) confirmed that quenching mechanism is static, and the observed distance between the donor and acceptor is 1.18 nm. Molecular docking results are in agreement with experimental data suggesting that there is one site on HSA at which Pt(II) complex binds spontaneously. Moreover, docking results together with FRET evaluation illustrated that Pt(II) complex is located near Trp214 at a distance of 1.96 nm. Our experimental and theoretical results indicated that the driving forces for Pt(II) complex interaction with HSA are hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions. The combination of molecular docking and spectroscopy methods suggested that use of this new Pt(II) complex as an anti-cancer agent, is an effective innovative approach in cancer chemotherapy providing a better understanding of effects of new designed drugs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10895-017-2120-4DOI Listing
September 2017

Probing the biological evaluations of a new designed Pt(II) complex using spectroscopic and theoretical approaches: human hemoglobin as a target.

J Biomol Struct Dyn 2016 May 14;34(5):1123-31. Epub 2015 Aug 14.

d Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics , University of Tehran , Tehran , Iran.

In recent years, using heavy metal compounds such as platinum as anticancer agent is one of the common ways in chemical therapy. In this study, a new anticancer compound of glycine derivatives of Pt(II) complex (amyl-glycine1, 10-phenanthroline Platinum nitrate) was designed, and the biological effects of this novel compound on the alterations in the function and structure of human hemoglobin (Hb) at different temperatures of 25 and 37°C were assessed by applying various spectroscopic (fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD)) and theoretical methods. Fluorescence data indicated the strong ability of Pt(II) complex to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of Hb. The binding constant, number of binding sites, and thermodynamic parameters at two temperatures were calculated, and the results indicated the major possibility of occurring van der Waals force or hydrogen bond interactions in the Pt(II) complex-Hb interaction. For evaluating the alteration of secondary structure of Hb upon interaction with various concentrations of complex, far-UV CD spectra were used and it was observed that in high dose of complex, significant changes were occurred which is indicative of some side effects in overdosing of this complex. On the other hand, the molecular docking results illustrate that are well in agreement in obtaining data with spectroscopy. Above results suggested that using Pt(II) complex as an anticancer agent, model drug in high-dose usage might cause some disordering in structure and function of Hb as well as improve understanding of the side effects of newly designed metal anticancer drugs undergoing.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07391102.2015.1071280DOI Listing
May 2016