Publications by authors named "Omer Senbaklavaci"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Relocation of an infected tracheostoma: anterior mediastinal tracheostomy as Mission:Impossible.

Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg 2021 Apr 1. Epub 2021 Apr 1.

Department of Thoracic Surgery, Medical Center-University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, Freiburg, Germany.

Infected tracheostomas are frequently associated with high morbidity and mortality rates-especially in patients after neck-oncological surgery with subsequent radiochemotherapy. A 59-year-old male patient with a history of hypopharynx carcinoma, successive laryngectomy and adjuvant radiochemotherapy developed an oesophagotracheal fistula with massive inflammation and periodical bleedings, uncontrollable by regular stent alternations. In a multidisciplinary setting, the decision was made to treat the patient with an anterior mediastinal tracheostomy. Extending usual anterior mediastinal tracheostomy indications, we present an ultimate treatment option for infected tracheostomas and highly advocate this interdisciplinary venture, as it significantly improves quality of life.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/icvts/ivab071DOI Listing
April 2021

Off-Pump Bilateral Lung Transplantation via Median Sternotomy: A Novel Approach With Potential Benefits.

Ann Thorac Surg 2019 08 18;108(2):e137-e139. Epub 2019 Apr 18.

Cardiothoracic Services, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom. Electronic address:

The clamshell incision is the standard approach for bilateral lung transplantation. There is limited experience with bilateral lung transplantation via median sternotomy, and the use of cardiopulmonary bypass seems to be mandatory in all cases while accepting the potential disadvantages of the extracorporeal circulation. We describe a novel approach for bilateral lung transplantation as an off-pump technique via median sternotomy. This approach has the potential to combine the advantages of median sternotomy with less postoperative pain, better chest wall function, and reduced risk of primary graft dysfunction and bleeding complications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.athoracsur.2019.03.055DOI Listing
August 2019

[Turkish translation and transcultural adaptation of Severe Respiratory Insufficiency (SRI) questionnaire].

Tuberk Toraks 2017 03;65(1):66-68

Department of Chest Diseases, Faculty of Medicine, Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir, Turkey.

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March 2017

History of Lung Transplantation.

Turk Thorac J 2016 Apr 1;17(2):71-75. Epub 2016 Apr 1.

Department of Chest Surgery, Division of Lung Transplantation, Acıbadem University Atakent Hospital, İstanbul, Turkey.

History of lung transplantation in the world can be traced back to the early years of the 20 century when experimental vascular anastomotic techniques were developed by Carrel and Guthrie, followed by transplantation of thoracic organs on animal models by Demikhov and finally it was James Hardy who did the first lung transplantation attempt on human. But it was not until the discovery of cyclosporine and development of better surgical techniques that success could be achieved in that field by the Toronto Lung Transplant Group led by Joel Cooper. Up to the present day, over 51.000 lung transplants were performed in the world at different centers. The start of lung transplantation in Turkey has been delayed for various reasons. From 1998 on, there were several attempts but the first successful lung transplant was performed at Sureyyapasa Hospital in 2009. Today there are four lung transplant centers in Turkey; two in Istanbul, one in Ankara and another one in Izmir. Three lung transplant centers from Istanbul which belong to private sector have newly applied for licence from the Ministry of Health.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5578/ttj.17.2.014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5792120PMC
April 2016

Impact of previous cardiovascular surgery on postoperative morbidity and mortality after major pulmonary resection for non-small cell lung cancer.

Langenbecks Arch Surg 2013 Aug 13;398(6):903-7. Epub 2013 Jun 13.

Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Langenbeckstr. 1, 55131 Mainz, Germany.

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of previous cardiovascular surgery on the postoperative morbidity and mortality following major pulmonary resection for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Methods: Medical records of 227 patients, who underwent major pulmonary resection for NSCLC from 2003 to 2012 at our department, were reviewed retrospectively. Thirty-one patients with a mean age of 65.8 years had previous cardiovascular surgery (group A) including coronary artery revascularization in 11 patients, peripheral arterial revascularization in 6 patients, carotis endarterectomy in 9 patients, and combined coronary artery revascularization and carotis endarterectomy in 5 patients, whereas 167 patients (mean age = 62.0 years) had no cardiovascular comorbidity (group B). Twenty-nine patients with nonsurgically treated cardiovascular comorbidity were excluded from this study.

Results: There were no significant differences in overall postoperative morbidity (22.6 % in group A vs. 19.2 % in group B) and mortality (no mortality in group A vs. 2.4 % in group B) between both groups.

Conclusions: Major pulmonary resections for NSCLC can be performed safely in patients with previous cardiovascular surgical history who are fulfilling the common cardiopulmonary criteria of operability. Operative risk in this subpopulation is comparable to that in patients without cardiovascular comorbidity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00423-013-1081-6DOI Listing
August 2013

Giant bronchogenic cyst within the aortic wall mimicking symptoms of acute type A aortic dissection.

J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2011 Jan 3;141(1):e7-8. Epub 2010 Nov 3.

Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg-University, Mainz, Germany.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtcvs.2010.09.031DOI Listing
January 2011

Successful lung volume reduction surgery brings patients into better condition for later lung transplantation.

Eur J Cardiothorac Surg 2002 Sep;22(3):363-7

Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna, Austria.

Objectives: Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) is accepted as a potential alternative therapy to lung transplantation (LTX) for selected patients. However, the possible impact of LVRS on a subsequent LTX has not been clearly elucidated so far. We therefore analyzed the course of 27 patients who underwent LVRS followed by LTX in our institution.

Methods: Twenty-seven patients (11 male, 16 female, mean age 51.9+/-2.2 years) out of 119 patients who underwent LVRS between 1994 and 1999 underwent LTX 29.7+/-3.2 months (range 2-57 months) after LVRS. Based on the postoperative course of FeV1 after LVRS (best value within the first 6 months postoperatively compared with the preoperative value) patients were divided into two groups: Group A (n=11) without any improvement (FeV1 <20% increase), and Group B (n=16) with FeV1 increase > or = 20% after successful LVRS which declined to preoperative values after 8-42 months. Subsequent LTX was performed 22.9+/-5.6 months after LVRS in Group A and 34.3+/-4.9 months after LVRS in Group B (P<0.05). Patients were analyzed according to the course of their functional improvement and of their body mass index (BMI) after LVRS and to survival after LTX, respectively. Values are given as the mean+/-SEM and significance was calculated by the chi(2)-test whereas continuous values were estimated by Student's t-test.

Results: Patients in Group A without improvement in FeV1 after LVRS had no increase in BMI as well and this resulted in a high perioperative mortality of 27.3% after LTX. On the contrary, patients in Group B, who had a clear increase of FeV1 after LVRS, experienced a significant increase of BMI of 23.2+/-4.5% as well (P<0.05). This improvement in BMI remained stable despite a later deterioration of FeV1 prior to LTX. After LTX, these patients had a significantly lower perioperative mortality of 6.3% as compared to Group A (P=0.03).

Conclusions: Successful LVRS delays the need for transplantation, improves nutritional status and brings patients into a better pretransplant condition, which results in decreased perioperative mortality at LTX. Patients after failed LVRS, however, should be considered as poor candidates for later transplantation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s1010-7940(02)00354-8DOI Listing
September 2002

The value of switching from cyclosporine to tacrolimus in the treatment of refractory acute rejection and obliterative bronchiolitis after lung transplantation.

Transpl Int 2002 Jan 18;15(1):24-8. Epub 2002 Jan 18.

Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090, Austria.

Standard cyclosporine-based immunosuppression is ineffective in the treatment of refractory acute rejection (RAR) and obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) that follows lung transplantation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of switching from cyclosporine to tacrolimus in the treatment of these situations. Nineteen patients entered the study. The indication for switching was OB in 11 patients and RAR in 8. Mean age was 41.3 +/- 13.1 years. In patients with RAR, the number of acute rejections was 1.5 +/- 0.7 and there were zero episodes per patient per 100 days before and after switching, respectively ( P = 0.02). There was no significant reduction of the decline of forced expiratory volume (FEV(1)) within 6 months after switching in patients with OB. We conclude that the conversion from cyclosporine to tacrolimus was associated with favourable results in the treatment of RAR. Further studies are required to assess the influence of this approach in the treatment of OB.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00147-001-0370-0DOI Listing
January 2002