Publications by authors named "Omer Nadir Koc"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Sacroplasty: report of three cases.

Turk Neurosurg 2010 Jul;20(3):418-22

Umraniye Training and Research Hospital, Neurosurgery Clinic, Istanbul, Turkey.

Aim: Sacral stress fractures are rare fractures presenting themselves with low back and groin pain. These fractures can be treated effectively using sacroplasty.

Material And Methods: The clinical and radiological data of three cases that underwent sacroplasty for sacral stress fractures were reviewed. The pain severity was assessed using the VAS system. The radiological investigation was performed using sacral CT and MRI.

Results: The sacroplasty procedure was performed in three female cases with sacral stress fractures resistant to conservative treatment. There was history of minor trauma in all cases. The diagnosis was performed using CT and MRI. The sacroplasty procedure was performed using the short-axis technique. The preoperative VAS score reduced from 8.5 to 2.3 postoperatively.

Conclusion: It is concluded that sacroplasty is an effective and safe procedure in the treatment of the sacral stress fractures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5137/1019-5149.JTN.2676-09.3DOI Listing
July 2010

Sacroiliac joint dysfunction.

Turk Neurosurg 2010 Jul;20(3):398-401

Istanbul Medipol Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Istanbul, Turkey.

Aim: Sacroiliac joint dysfunction is a disorder presenting with low back and groin pain. It should be taken into consideration during the preoperative differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniation, lumbar spinal stenosis and facet syndrome.

Material And Methods: Four cases with sacroiliac dysfunction are presented. The clinical and radiological signs supported the evidence of sacroiliac dysfunction, and exact diagnosis was made after positive response to sacroiliac joint block.

Results: A percutaneous sacroiliac fixation provided pain relief in all cases. The mean VAS scores reduced from 8.2 to 2.2.

Conclusion: It is concluded that sacroiliac joint dysfunction diagnosis requires a careful physical examination of the sacroiliac joints in all cases with low back and groin pain. The diagnosis is made based on positive response to the sacroiliac block. Sacroiliac fixation was found to be effective in carefully selected cases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5137/1019-5149.JTN.2612-09.2DOI Listing
July 2010

A perspective for the selection of surgical approaches in patients with upper thoracic and cervicothoracic junction instabilities.

Surg Neurol 2006 May;65(5):454-63; discussion 463

Sişili Etfal State Hospital, Clinic of Neurosurgery, Istanbul, Turkey.

Objective: To reach the upper thoracic vertebrae, a number of extensive approaches have been proposed. The purpose of this study is to provide a clear perspective for the selection of surgical approaches in patients who undergo vertebral body resection, reconstruction, and stabilization for upper thoracic and cervicothoracic junction instabilities.

Methods: Seventeen patients with upper thoracic or cervicothoracic junction (C7-T6) instability underwent surgery between January 1999 and May 2004. All patients presented with pain and/or neurological deficits. The causes of instabilities were 10 traumas and 7 pathological fractures. The approach chosen was primarily dictated by 3 factors including (1) type of injury, (2) level of lesion, and (3) time of admission. Ventral surgical approach was performed to all pathological and traumatic fractures causing anterior spinal cord compression. Level of lesion determined the selection of the type of ventral surgical approach, namely, supramanubrial, transmanubrial, or lateral transthoracic. On the other hand, combined (anterior and posterior) approach was performed to all late admitted trauma patients.

Results: Twelve anterior, 2 combined (anterior and posterior), and 3 posterior approaches were performed in this study. Anterior approaches included 3 transmanubrial, 5 upper lateral transthoracic, and 4 supramanubrial cervical dissection procedures for decompression, fusion, and plate-screw fixation depending on the levels of the lesion. The mean follow-up period was 18 months, ranging from 10 to 58 months. Nonunion or instrument-related complications were not observed. The postoperative neurological conditions were statistically significantly better than the preoperative ones (P = .003).

Conclusion: Consideration of the type of injury, level of lesion, and time of admission can provide a perspective for the selection of side of surgical approach for this transitional part of the spinal column. This study also suggests that supramanubrial cervical approach achieves sufficient exposure up to T2, transmanubrial approach for T3, and lateral transthoracic approach below T3.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.surneu.2005.08.017DOI Listing
May 2006