Publications by authors named "Omar Jmour"

16 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Survival after hypofractionation in glioblastoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Radiat Oncol 2020 Jun 8;15(1):145. Epub 2020 Jun 8.

SAINBIOSE U1059, Jean Monnet University, Saint-Etienne, France.

Background: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has a poor prognosis despite a multi modal treatment that includes normofractionated radiotherapy. So, various hypofractionated alternatives to normofractionated RT have been tested to improve such prognosis. There is need of systematic review and meta-analysis to analyse the literature properly and maybe generalised the use of hypofractionation. The aim of this study was first, to perform a meta-analysis of all controlled trials testing the impact of hypofractionation on survival without age restriction and secondly, to analyse data from all non-comparative trials testing the impact of hypofractionation, radiosurgery and hypofractionated stereotactic RT in first line.

Materials/methods: We searched Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases to identify all publications testing the impact of hypofractionation in glioblastoma between 1985 and March 2020. Combined hazard ratio from comparative studies was calculated for overall survival. The impact of study design, age and use of adjuvant temozolomide was explored by stratification. Meta-regressions were performed to determine the impact of prognostic factors.

Results: 2283 publications were identified. Eleven comparative trials were included. No impact on overall survival was evidenced (HR: 1.07, 95%CI: 0.89-1.28) without age restriction. The analysis of non-comparative literature revealed heterogeneous outcomes with limited quality of reporting. Concurrent chemotherapy, completion of surgery, immobilization device, isodose of prescription, and prescribed dose (depending on tumour volume) were poorly described. However, results on survival are encouraging and were correlated with the percentage of resected patients and with patients age but not with median dose.

Conclusions: Because few trials were randomized and because the limited quality of reporting, it is difficult to define the place of hypofactionation in glioblastoma. In first line, hypofractionation resulted in comparable survival outcome with the benefit of a shortened duration. The method used to assess hypofractionation needs to be improved.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13014-020-01584-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7278121PMC
June 2020

CBCT evaluation of inter- and intra-fraction motions during prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy: a technical note.

Radiat Oncol 2020 Apr 19;15(1):85. Epub 2020 Apr 19.

Department of radiation oncology, Lucien Neuwirth Cancer Institute, 108 Bis, Avenue Albert Raimond, 42270, Saint Priest en Jarez, France.

Background: In most clinical trials, gold fiducial markers are implanted in the prostate to tune the table position before each radiation beam. Yet, it is unclear if a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) should be performed before each beam to monitor a possible variation of the organs at risk (OARs) fullness, especially in case of recto-prostatic spacer implantation. The present study aimed at assessing the inter- and intra-fraction movements of prostate, bladder and rectum in patients implanted with a hyaluronic acid spacer and undergoing prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT).

Methods: Data about consecutive patients undergoing prostate SBRT were prospectively collected between 2015 and 2019. Inter-and intra-fraction prostate displacements and volume variation of organs at risk (OARs) were assessed with CBCTs.

Results: Eight patients were included. They underwent prostate SBRT (37.5Gy, 5 fractions of 7.5Gy) guided by prostate gold fiducial markers. Inter-fraction variation of the bladder volume was insignificant. Intra-fraction mean increase of the bladder volume was modest (29 cc) but significant (p < 0.001). Both inter- and intra-fraction variations of the rectum volume were insignificant but for one patient. He had no rectal toxicity. The magnitude of table displacement necessary to match the prostate gold fiducial marker frequently exceeded the CTV/PTV margins (0.4 cm) before the first (35%) and the second arc (15%). Inter- and intra-fraction bladder and rectum volume variations did not correlate with prostate displacement.

Conclusion: Major prostate position variations were reported. In-room kV fiducial imaging before each arc seems mandatory. Intra-fraction imaging of the OARs appears unnecessary. We suggest that only one CBCT is needed before the first arc.

Trial Registration: NCT02361515, February 11th, 2015.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13014-020-01534-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7168857PMC
April 2020

Axillary nodal irradiation practice in the sentinel lymph node biopsy era: Comparison of the contemporary available 3D and IMRT techniques.

Br J Radiol 2020 Jun 1;93(1110):20190351. Epub 2020 Apr 1.

AP-HP. Department of Radiation Oncology and Henri Mondor Breast Center, Créteil, France.

Objective: Our study aimed to compare regional node coverage and doses to the organ at risk (OAR) using conventional technique (CT) "AMAROS" (AT) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques in patients receiving regional nodal irradiation (RNI) for breast cancer (BC).

Methods: We included 30 consecutive patients with BC who received RNI including axillary nodes. Two independent and blinded dosimetric RNI plans were generated for all patients. For target volume coverage, we analyzed the V95%, the D95%, the mean and the minimal dose within the nodal station. For hotspots within nodal target volume, we used the V105%, the V108% and the maximal doses. For OAR, lung V20, mean lung and heart doses, the maximal dose to the brachial plexus and the axillary-lateral thoracic vessel junction region were compared between the three techniques.

Results: Target volume coverage and hotspots: Mean V95% in stations I, II, III and IV were 35.8% and 75% respectively with CV, 22.59 and 59.9% respectively with AT technique and 45.58 and 99.6% respectively with IMRT with statistically significant differences ( < 0.001). Mean V105% (cc) in axillary and supraclavicular stations were 21.3 and 6.4 respectively with CV, 1.2 and 0.02 respectively with AT technique and 0.5 and 0.4 respectively with IMRT with statistically significant differences ( < 0.001)..OARs: The mean ipsilateral lung V20 was 16.9%, 16.4 and 13.3% with CT, AT and IMRT respectively. The mean heart dose (Gy) was 0.3, 0.2 and 0.2 with CT, AT and IMRT respectively. The maximal dose to the plexus brachial (Gy) was 50.3, 46.3 and 47.3 with CT, AT and IMRT respectively. The maximal dose to the axillary-lateral thoracic vessel junction (Gy) was 52.3, 47.3 and 47.6 with CT, AT and IMRT respectively. The differences were statistically significant for all OAR ( < 0.001).

Conclusion: AT is a valuable technique for RNI including axilla in patients with limited sentinel lymph node biopsy involvement without additional axillary lymph node dissection since it decreases hotspots in the target volume and lowers the radiation exposure of the OAR. For more advanced tumors or patients who did not respond to primary systemic therapy, CT or IMRT should be considered because of their better coverage of the potentially residual nodal disease. IMRT combines several advantages of offering high conformal plans, limited hotspots and protection of main OAR. The clinical impact of these dosimetric differences need to be addressed.

Advances In Knowledge: This study is to our knowledge the first to compare conventional three-dimensional and IMRT techniques for regional nodal irradiation for each nodal station in breast cancer in a context of increasing utilization of .
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1259/bjr.20190351DOI Listing
June 2020

Chemoradiation and granulocyte-colony or granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factors (G-CSF or GM-CSF): time to think out of the box?

Br J Radiol 2020 May 4;93(1109):20190147. Epub 2020 Feb 4.

Department of Radiotherapy, Lucien Neuwirth Cancer Institute, Saint-Priest en Jarez, France.

Concerns have been raised about potential toxic interactions when colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) and chemoradiation are concurrently performed. In 2006, the ASCO guidelines advised against their concomitant use. Nevertheless, with the development of modern radiotherapy techniques and supportive care, the therapeutic index of combined chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and CSFs is worth reassessing. Recent clinical trials testing chemoradiation in lung cancer let investigators free to decide the use of concomitant CSFs or not. No abnormal infield event was reported after the use of modern radiotherapy techniques and concomitant chemotherapy regimens. These elements call for further investigation to set new recommendations in favour of the association of chemoradiation and CSFs. Moreover, radiotherapy could induce anticancer systemic effects mediated by the immune system and . With combined CSFs, this effect was reinforced in preclinical and clinical trials introducing innovative radioimmunotherapy models. So far, the association of radiation with CSFs has not been combined with immunotherapy. However, it might play a major role in triggering an immune response against cancer cells, leading to abscopal effects. The present article reassesses the therapeutic index of the combination CSFs-chemoradiation through an updated review on its safety and efficacy. It also provides a special focus on radioimmunotherapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1259/bjr.20190147DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7217575PMC
May 2020

[Radiotherapy and immune suppression: A short review].

Bull Cancer 2020 Jan 19;107(1):84-101. Epub 2019 Dec 19.

Institut de cancérologie Lucien-Neuwirth, département de radiothérapie, 108 bis, avenue Albert-Raimond, BP 60008, 42271 Saint-Priest-en-Jarez cedex, France; Institut de cancérologie Lucien-Neuwirth, département universitaire de recherche et éducation, 108 bis, avenue Albert-Raimond, BP 60008, 42271 Saint-Priest-en-Jarez cedex, France.

The management of patients undergoing immunosuppressive agents is really challenging. Based on precaution principle, it seems mandatory to stop immunosuppressive (or immunomodulating) agents during radiation. Yet, it is impossible in grafted patients. It is possible in patients with autoimmune disease, but in this case, the autoimmune disease might modify patient's radio-sensitivity. We provide a short review about the safety of radiotherapy in grafted/auto-immune patients. The literature is limited with data coming from outdated case-report or case-control studies. It seems that radiotherapy is feasible in grafted patients, but special dose-constraints limitations must probably be considered for the transplant and the other organs at risk. There is very little data about the safety of radiotherapy, when associated with immunomodulating agents. The most studied drug is the methotrexate but only its prescription as a chemotherapy (high doses for a short period of time) was reported. When used as an immunomodulator, it should probably be stopped 4 months before and after radiation. Apart from rheumatoid arthritis, it seems that collagen vascular diseases and especially systemic scleroderma and systemic lupus erythematous feature increased radio-sensitivity with increased severe late toxicities. Transplanted patients and collagen vascular disease patients should be informed that there is very little data about safety of radiation in their case.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bulcan.2019.09.010DOI Listing
January 2020

[Stereotactic body radiotherapy: Passing fad or revolution?]

Bull Cancer 2020 Feb 19;107(2):244-253. Epub 2019 Dec 19.

Institut de cancérologie Lucien-Neuwirth, département de radiothérapie, 108, bis avenue Albert-Raimond, BP60008, 42271 Saint-Priest-en-Jarez cedex, France; Institut de cancérologie Lucien-Neuwirth, département universitaire de la recherche et de l'enseignement, 108, bis avenue Albert-Raimond, BP60008, 42271 Saint Priest en Jarez cedex, France. Electronic address:

Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a young technology that can deliver a high dose of radiation to the target, utilizing either a single dose or a small number of fractions with a high degree of precision within the body. Various technical solutions co-exist nowadays, with particular features, possibilities and limitations. Health care authorities have currently validated SBRT in a very limited number of locations, but many indications are still under investigation. It is therefore challenging to accurately appreciate the SBRT therapeutic index, its place and its role within the anticancer therapeutic arsenal. The aim of the present review is to provide SBRT definitions, current indications, and summarize the future ways of research. There are three validated indications for SBRT: un-resecable T1-T2 non small cell lung cancer, <3 slow-growing pulmonary metastases secondary to a stabilized primary, and the tumours located close to the medulla. In other situations, the benefit of SBRT is still to be demonstrated. One of the most promising way of research is the ablative treatment of oligo metastatic cancers, with recent studies suggesting a survival benefit. Furthermore, the most recent data suggest that SBRT is safe. Finally, the SBRT combined with immune therapies is promising, since it could theoretically trigger the adaptative anticancer response.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bulcan.2019.09.011DOI Listing
February 2020

Chemoradiation phase II trials: re-exploring a world of missed opportunities.

Acta Oncol 2019 Aug 10;58(8):1158-1162. Epub 2019 May 10.

a Department of Radiation Oncology , Lucien Neuwirth Cancer Institute , Saint-Priest-en-Jarez , France.

Phase II trials are designed to assess the efficacy/toxicity ratio of experimental treatments and select those worth being tested in phase III trials. Although crucial limitations were identified when concurrent chemoradiation (cCRT) phase III trials characteristics were assessed, features of cCRT phase II trials have never been reported. The objective was to describe features of all cCRT phase II trials. Requests were performed in the Medline database (via PubMed). The latest update was performed in April 2016, using the following MESH terms: 'clinical trials: phase II as topic', 'chemoradiotherapy'. Four hundred and fifty-eight cCRT phase II trials were identified. They were mainly multicenter (51.5%), single arm studies (77.7%) published after 2011 (55.0%). The median number of included patients was 52. Primary endpoints were mainly response rate (20.5%), pathological complete response (14.4%) and overall survival (12.6%). The primary endpoint was not defined in 22% of studies. Tumors were mostly lung (23.1%), head and neck (20.3%), colorectal (16.6%) and esophagogastric cancer (14.6%) treated at a locally advanced setting (81.7%). 55.2% of trials used 3D-conformal radiotherapy and 9.1% intensity-modulated radiotherapy, mainly with normo-fractionation (82.0% of the 573 arms with radiotherapy). Radiation technique was not reported in 19.9% of studies. Associated anticancer drugs (563 arms) were mainly conventional chemotherapies (559 arms): cisplatin (46.2%) and 5-fluorouracil (28.3%). Non cytotoxic agents (targeted therapies, immunotherapies) were tested in 97 arms (17%). With a median follow-up of 31 months, acute grades 3-5 were reported in 98.5% of studies and late toxicities in 44.5%. Follow-up was not reported in 17% of studies. cCRT phase II trials featured severe limitations, with outdated radiation techniques, insufficient reporting of crucial data and a small number of included patients. This certainly limited the impact of conclusions and hindered the development of successful phase III trials.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0284186X.2019.1605194DOI Listing
August 2019

[Complementary and alternative medicines in cancer patients].

Bull Cancer 2019 May 23;106(5):479-491. Epub 2019 Apr 23.

Institut de cancérologie Lucien-Neuwirth, département de radiothérapie, 108 bis, avenue Albert-Raimond, BP 60008, 42271 Saint-Priest-en-Jarez cedex, France.

Complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs) play more and more a significant role both in France and all over the world. Yet, their definition and their role in cancer treatments legitimately raise concerns. This article aims at establishing a picture of the CAMs admitted by the French Medical Board as well as those which are new or in common medical practices in France. We start with a brief reminder of their origin, their status and how they are used. Then, we review the literature about some of the best clinical trials using CAMs in cancer patients. To finish, we try to understand what makes CAMs so thrilling, but also why they create controversy and which common points they may have with conventional medicine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bulcan.2019.02.011DOI Listing
May 2019

Quality insurance in head and neck cancer multidisciplinary team meetings: A watchful eye on real-life experience.

Oral Oncol 2019 04 26;91:35-38. Epub 2019 Feb 26.

Department of Radiotherapy, Lucien Neuwirth Cancer Institute, Saint-Priest en Jarez, France. Electronic address:

Introduction: Although Multidisciplinary Team Management (MDT) is integrated in most international head and neck cancer treatment guidelines, its applications and proceedings were rarely described. The present study explores a 6-year real-life experience in a French Comprehensive Cancer Care Center.

Methods: Patients, tumor and meeting characteristics of all consecutive cases discussed in head and neck MDT meetings between 2010 and 2015 were retrospectively reviewed.

Results: From 2010 to 2015, 1849 cases (accounting for 1786 patients) were discussed in 138 MDT meetings. Median age was 62 (range: 15-96). When reported (n = 310, 16.8%), performance status was ≥2 in 36.1% of patients. Tumors were mainly squamous cell carcinomas (n = 1664, 91.5%) of the larynx/hypo-pharynx (n = 630, 34.4%), oropharynx (n = 518; 28.3%) and oral cavity (n = 339; 18.5%). Tumors were diagnosed at a locally (n = 358, 25%), locally advanced (n = 946, 66%) or metastatic setting (n = 53, 3.7%). Mean number of discussed patients per MDT meeting was 16 (range: 3-32). Most patients were discussed once (n = 1663, 97%). Most patients (n = 969, 52%) underwent treatment before MDT meetings: mainly surgery (n = 709, 73.2%). The mean time between MDT meeting and first radiation course was 21 days (range: 1-116).

Discussion: Optimal multimodal treatment management is based on MDT meetings and results from the interaction and coordination of surgeons, medical and radiation oncologists. In the present series, most patients were discussed once despite the number of expected recurrences, suggesting that the management of tumor progression was not discussed in head and neck MDT meetings. Furthermore, most patients had surgery before MDT meeting, pointing out that MDT role and place still needs to be improved. Finally, the present population significantly differed from patients included in phase III clinical trials, with more advanced age and poorer condition. It calls for the necessity of a high-quality head and neck MDT meeting since evidence-based recommendations should be adapted to patient's frailties.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.oraloncology.2019.02.020DOI Listing
April 2019

[LHRH analogs in adjuvant endocrine therapy for pre-menopausal localized breast cancers: Ending the controversy for novel guidelines?]

Bull Cancer 2019 Apr 8;106(4):342-353. Epub 2019 Mar 8.

Institut de cancérologie Lucien-Neuwirth, département de la recherche et de l'enseignement (DURE), 108 bis, avenue Albert-Raimond, 42271 Saint-Priest-en-Jarez, France; Institut de cancérologie Lucien-Neuwirth, département de radiothérapie, 108 bis, avenue Albert-Raimond, 42271 Saint-Priest-en-Jarez, France. Electronic address:

Endocrine treatment represents the cornerstone of endocrine-sensitive pre-menopausal early breast cancer. The estrogen blockade plays a leading role in the therapeutic management with surgery, radiotherapy and selective antiestrogen treatment. For several years, selective estrogen receptor modulators, such as tamoxifen, have revolutionized medical care of hormone receptors-positive breast cancer and have conquered the therapeutic arsenal while becoming the gold standard of treatment. Other combinations associating the ovarian function suppression using LHRH agonists with tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors have been recently investigated, leading to mitigated opinions regarding the clinical benefit of these associations. We propose here a comprehensive overview on existing data and their actualization concerning LHRH analogues, whilst emphasizing benefit-risk balance for this targeted population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bulcan.2019.01.012DOI Listing
April 2019

[Innovation in radiotherapy: A glance at 2018].

Bull Cancer 2019 Jan 4;106(1):48-54. Epub 2019 Jan 4.

Institut de cancérologie Lucien Neuwirth, département de radiothérapie, 108 bis, avenue Albert-Raimond, BP60008, 42271 Saint-Priest-en-Jarez cedex, France; Département universitaire de la recherche et de l'enseignement, institut de cancérologie Lucien Neuwirth, 108, bis avenue Albert Raimond, BP60008, 42271 Saint-Priest-en-Jarez cedex, France.

Innovation in radiotherapy should meet multiple challenges, both technically, biologically, clinically and socially. Scientific, technological and biological advances have resulted in major changes in the implementation, indications, and therapeutic index of radiotherapy over the last century. Based on technical innovations (conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulation, CBCT, stereotactic body radiotherapy and MRI embedded system) and knowledge in cancer biology ("oxygen effect", "checkpoints", targeted therapies, molecular profiles and immunotherapy) highlighted in recent decades, the news in radiotherapy is rich and varied. The 2018 news are particularly focused in the role of hypofractionation in prostate cancer, the use of stereotactic body radiotherapy in oligometastatic patients, the possibility of de-intensify treatment in HPV-related oropharynx cancer, and the combination of short-term androgen deprivation to prostate bed salvage radiotherapy. The present manuscript reviews the 2018 latest advances.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bulcan.2018.12.006DOI Listing
January 2019

Radiothérapie et immunothérapie.

Bull Cancer 2018 Dec;105 Suppl 1:S92-S100

Département de radiothérapie, Institut de Cancérologie Lucien Neuwirth, 108 bis avenue Albert Raimond, BP60008, 42271 Saint Priest en Jarez cedex, France; Laboratoire de Radiobiologie Cellulaire et Moléculaire, CNRS UMR 5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, IPNL, 69622 Villeurbanne, France.. Electronic address:

Radiation Therapy And Immunotherapy: Nowadays, it is known and recognized that the immune system has a central place in the mechanisms of oncogenesis and the effectiveness of anti-cancer therapies. The demonstration of the immuno-stimulatory ability of radiation therapy opens the field to new applications for this therapy already widely used in oncology area. Indeed, radiotherapy is capable of initiating and / or increasing the immune-mediated anti-tumor response. The combination of this "old" therapy with the "new" therapies that are immunotherapies then makes perfect sense. Although the potentiating effect of this combination is based on an interesting and well-documented biological rationale in preclinical data, there are still few clinical data available. The multiplication of trials, and the arrival of phase III trials should give us more perspective on the effectiveness and safety of this association. However, the lack of consensus concerning the optimization of these "immuno-radiotherapies" (characteristics of the tumor, irradiation regimen and treatment plan) could prove deleterious for the results of ongoing studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0007-4551(18)30394-1DOI Listing
December 2018

[Radiation therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. A review].

Bull Cancer 2018 May 10;105(5):517-522. Epub 2018 Apr 10.

Université Paris Est Créteil (UPEC), AP-HP, hôpitaux universitaires Henri-Mondor, service d'oncologie-radiothérapie & centre sein Henri-Mondor, 51, avenue du Maréchal-de-Lattre-de-Tassigny, 94010 Créteil, France; Inserm unité 955 EQ 07, 94010 Créteil, France. Electronic address:

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, are multifactorial diseases characterized by a chronic intestinal inflammation. Abdominal and pelvic irradiation can result in acute or chronic digestive toxicity. A few old studies on small population samples have suggested an increase of gastro-intestinal toxicities in patients with IBD in case of irradiation. Nevertheless, the physiopathology is unknown. More recent studies, including new irradiation techniques, have shown less toxicity events in these patients with IBD. There are no recommendations for irradiation in patients with IBD. This review aims to report recent data on this topic and discuss them regarding radiation parameters.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bulcan.2018.02.005DOI Listing
May 2018

Gastric metastasis of bilateral breast cancer.

J Gastrointest Oncol 2017 Feb;8(1):E16-E20

Department of Radiation Oncology, Salah Azaiez Institute, Faculty of Medicine of Tunis, Tunis El Manar University, Tunis, Tunisia.

Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. The most frequent metastatic sites are lung, bone, liver and brain. On the other hand, gastric metastases are rare. Synchronous bilateral breast cancer (SBBC) occurs rarely. Lobular carcinoma is the histological type most often associated with bilateral breast carcinomas and gastric metastases. We made a retrospective study including four patients followed in the Salah Azaiez Institute, for a bilateral breast cancer with gastric metastases. We analyzed the epidemiological, anatomoclinical and therapeutic particularities of this rare entity. Symptoms were unspecific. The diagnosis of gastric metastasis of the SBBC was confirmed by a histopathological examination of an endoscopic biopsy. The median age was 46.2 years (range, 36-51 years) and the median time until the gastric involvement was 19 months (range, 0-41 months). None of patients had a surgical treatment for the gastric location. All Patients received at least one line of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Median survival following the detection of gastric involvement was 22 months (range, 1-56 months). Gastric metastases from breast cancer are rare and frequently associated with other distant metastasis. Symptoms are unspecific and endoscopy may not be contributive. Therefore, gastric involvement is underestimated. Lobular infiltrating carcinoma (LIC) is the most histological type incriminated in its occurrence. The supply of immunohistochemistry is crucial to distinguish between primary or metastatic gastric cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.21037/jgo.2016.10.03DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5334049PMC
February 2017

Brachytherapy of Uveal Melanomas with Ruthenium-106 Plaques

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2016 12 1;17(12):5281-5285. Epub 2016 Dec 1.

Radiation oncology department, Salah Azaiez Institute, Tunis, Tunisia. Faculty of medicine of Tunis, Tunis–el Manar University, Tunis, Tunisia. Email:

Background: Brachytherapy is the most commonly used conservative treatment for the uveal melanoma. The aim of this study was to evaluate therapeutic results of Ruthenium-106 plaque brachytherapy in the management of localized uveal melanoma cases. Methods: We reviewed retrospectively the clinical records of all patients treated in our department for an uveal melanoma, undergoing Ruthenium-106 plaque brachytherapy, from January 1996 to December 2015. We focused on clinical features, therapeutic characteristics, local and distant tumor control and side effects. Results: Nineteen patients were enrolled in our study. Mean age was 56.2 years (28-79) and the sex ratio was 1.37:1 males to females. Diagnosis was made on the basis of ophthalmological clinical examination, angiography, ultrasound and/or magnetic resonance. Median tumor diameter was 9.7 mm (6-13) and median thickness 4.4 mm (2.5- 8). The dose of Ruthenium-106 plaque brachytherapy prescribed to the apex of each tumor was 70 Gy in all cases. The median radiation dose to the sclera surface was 226.4 Gy (range: 179.6–342.3) and the median total application time 115.2 hours (range: 27 to 237). After a median follow-up of 61.5 months, local control was achieved in 17 patients (89%): 16 demonstrated a partial tumor response and 1 tumor stabilization. Two patients suffered local progression leading to enucleation, one dying of hepatic metastasis. Radiation-induced complications were cataracts in 3 cases and vitreal hemorrhage in 2. Conclusion: Ruthenium-106 plaque brachytherapy is an efficient treatment for localized uveal melanoma, offering good local control with low toxicity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.22034/APJCP.2016.17.12.5281DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5454671PMC
December 2016