Publications by authors named "Olli P H Pietiläinen"

16 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Deletion of TOP3β, a component of FMRP-containing mRNPs, contributes to neurodevelopmental disorders.

Nat Neurosci 2013 Sep 4;16(9):1228-1237. Epub 2013 Aug 4.

Analytic and Translational Genetics Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Implicating particular genes in the generation of complex brain and behavior phenotypes requires multiple lines of evidence. The rarity of most high-impact genetic variants typically precludes the possibility of accruing statistical evidence that they are associated with a given trait. We found that the enrichment of a rare chromosome 22q11.22 deletion in a recently expanded Northern Finnish sub-isolate enabled the detection of association between TOP3B and both schizophrenia and cognitive impairment. Biochemical analysis of TOP3β revealed that this topoisomerase was a component of cytosolic messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs) and was catalytically active on RNA. The recruitment of TOP3β to mRNPs was independent of RNA cis-elements and was coupled to the co-recruitment of FMRP, the disease gene product in fragile X mental retardation syndrome. Our results indicate a previously unknown role for TOP3β in mRNA metabolism and suggest that it is involved in neurodevelopmental disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nn.3484DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3986889PMC
September 2013

Replication study and meta-analysis in European samples supports association of the 3p21.1 locus with bipolar disorder.

Biol Psychiatry 2012 Oct 5;72(8):645-50. Epub 2012 May 5.

MRC SGDP Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.

Background: Common genetic polymorphisms at chromosome 3p21.1, including rs2251219 in polybromo 1 (PBRM1), have been implicated in susceptibility to bipolar affective disorder (BP) through genome-wide association studies. Subsequent studies have suggested that this is also a risk locus for other psychiatric phenotypes, including major depression and schizophrenia.

Methods: To replicate the association, we studied 2562 cases with BP and 25,439 control subjects collected from seven cohorts with either genome-wide association or individual genotyping of rs2251219 and tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms across the PBRM1 gene. Results from the different case-control groups were combined with the inverse variance weighting method.

Results: In our dataset, rs2251219 was associated with BP (odds ratio [OR] = .89, p = .003), and meta-analysis of previously published data with our nonoverlapping new data confirmed genome-wide significant association (OR = .875, p = 2.68 × 10(-9)). Genotypic data from the SGENE-plus consortium were used to examine the association of the same variant with schizophrenia in an overall sample of 8794 cases and 25,457 control subjects, but this was not statistically significant (OR = .97, p = .21).

Conclusions: There is strong evidence of association of rs2251219 with BP. However, our data do not support association of this marker with schizophrenia. Because the region of association has high linkage disequilibrium, forming a large haplotype block across many genes, it is not clear which gene is causally implicated in the disorder.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2012.02.040DOI Listing
October 2012

Common variants at VRK2 and TCF4 conferring risk of schizophrenia.

Hum Mol Genet 2011 Oct 26;20(20):4076-81. Epub 2011 Jul 26.

deCODE Genetics, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland.

Common sequence variants have recently joined rare structural polymorphisms as genetic factors with strong evidence for association with schizophrenia. Here we extend our previous genome-wide association study and meta-analysis (totalling 7 946 cases and 19 036 controls) by examining an expanded set of variants using an enlarged follow-up sample (up to 10 260 cases and 23 500 controls). In addition to previously reported alleles in the major histocompatibility complex region, near neurogranin (NRGN) and in an intron of transcription factor 4 (TCF4), we find two novel variants showing genome-wide significant association: rs2312147[C], upstream of vaccinia-related kinase 2 (VRK2) [odds ratio (OR) = 1.09, P = 1.9 × 10(-9)] and rs4309482[A], between coiled-coiled domain containing 68 (CCDC68) and TCF4, about 400 kb from the previously described risk allele, but not accounted for by its association (OR = 1.09, P = 7.8 × 10(-9)).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/ddr325DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3298077PMC
October 2011

Phenotype mining in CNV carriers from a population cohort.

Hum Mol Genet 2011 Jul 19;20(13):2686-95. Epub 2011 Apr 19.

Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland, and Department of Medical Genetics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.

Phenotype mining is a novel approach for elucidating the genetic basis of complex phenotypic variation. It involves a search of rich phenotype databases for measures correlated with genetic variation, as identified in genome-wide genotyping or sequencing studies. An initial implementation of phenotype mining in a prospective unselected population cohort, the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort (NFBC1966), identifies neurodevelopment-related traits-intellectual deficits, poor school performance and hearing abnormalities-which are more frequent among individuals with large (>500 kb) deletions than among other cohort members. Observation of extensive shared single nucleotide polymorphism haplotypes around deletions suggests an opportunity to expand phenotype mining from cohort samples to the populations from which they derive.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/ddr162DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3110003PMC
July 2011

Maternally derived microduplications at 15q11-q13: implication of imprinted genes in psychotic illness.

Am J Psychiatry 2011 Apr 15;168(4):408-17. Epub 2011 Feb 15.

Research Institute of Biological Psychiatry, Mental Health Center Sct. Hans, Copenhagen University Hospital, Roskilde, Denmark.

Objective: Rare copy number variants have been implicated in different neurodevelopmental disorders, with the same copy number variants often increasing risk of more than one of these phenotypes. In a discovery sample of 22 schizophrenia patients with an early onset of illness (10-15 years of age), the authors observed in one patient a maternally derived 15q11-q13 duplication overlapping the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome critical region. This prompted investigation of the role of 15q11-q13 duplications in psychotic illness.

Method: The authors scanned 7,582 patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 41,370 comparison subjects without known psychiatric illness for copy number variants at 15q11-q13 and determined the parental origin of duplications using methylation-sensitive Southern hybridization analysis.

Results: Duplications were found in four case patients and five comparison subjects. All four case patients had maternally derived duplications (0.05%), while only three of the five comparison duplications were maternally derived (0.007%), resulting in a significant excess of maternally derived duplications in case patients (odds ratio=7.3). This excess is compatible with earlier observations that risk for psychosis in people with Prader-Willi syndrome caused by maternal uniparental disomy is much higher than in those caused by deletion of the paternal chromosome.

Conclusions: These findings suggest that the presence of two maternal copies of a fragment of chromosome 15q11.2-q13.1 that overlaps with the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome critical region may be a rare risk factor for schizophrenia and other psychoses. Given that maternal duplications of this region are among the most consistent cytogenetic observations in autism, the findings provide further support for a shared genetic etiology between autism and psychosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2010.09111660DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3428917PMC
April 2011

Candidate gene analysis of the human natural killer-1 carbohydrate pathway and perineuronal nets in schizophrenia: B3GAT2 is associated with disease risk and cortical surface area.

Biol Psychiatry 2011 Jan 15;69(1):90-6. Epub 2010 Oct 15.

Institute of Psychiatry, University of Oslo, Oslo University Hospital-Ulleval, Norway.

Background: The Human Natural Killer-1 carbohydrate (HNK-1) is involved in neurodevelopment and synaptic plasticity. Extracellular matrix structures called perineuronal nets, condensed around subsets of neurons and proximal dendrites during brain maturation, regulate synaptic transmission and plasticity.

Methods: Ten genes of importance for HNK-1 biosynthesis (B3GAT1, B3GAT2, and CHST10) or for the formation of perineuronal nets (TNR, BCAN, NCAN, HAPLN1, HAPLN2, HAPLN3, and HAPLN4) were investigated for potential involvement in schizophrenia (SCZ) susceptibility, by genotyping 104 tagSNPs in the Scandinavian Collaboration on Psychiatric Etiology sample (849 cases; 1602 control subjects). Genome-wide association study imputation data from the European SGENE-plus sample (2663 cases; 13,498 control subjects) were used for comparison. The effect of SCZ risk alleles on brain structure was investigated in a Norwegian subset (98 cases; 177 control subjects) with structural magnetic resonance imaging data.

Results: Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), located in two adjacent estimated linkage disequilibrium blocks in the first intron of β-1,3-glucuronyltransferase 2 (B3GAT2), were nominally associated with SCZ (.004 ≤ P(empirical) ≤ .05). The rs2460691 was significantly associated in the comparison sample and in the meta-analysis after correction for all 121 SNP/haplotype tests (P(raw) = 1 × 10(-4); P(corrected) = .018). Increased dosage of the rs2460691 SCZ risk allele was associated with decreased cortical area (p = .002) but not thickness or hippocampal volume. A second SNP (r(2) = .24 with rs10945275), which conferred the highest SCZ risk effect in the Norwegian subset, was also associated with cortical area.

Conclusions: The present results suggest that effects on biosynthesis of the neuronal epitope HNK-1, through common B3GAT2 variation, could increase the risk of SCZ, possibly by decreasing cortical area.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2010.07.035DOI Listing
January 2011

Gene variants associated with schizophrenia in a Norwegian genome-wide study are replicated in a large European cohort.

J Psychiatr Res 2010 Sep 24;44(12):748-53. Epub 2010 Feb 24.

Institute of Psychiatry, University of Oslo, P.O. 1130, Blindern, N-0318 Oslo, Norway

We have performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of schizophrenia in a Norwegian discovery sample of 201 cases and 305 controls (TOP study) with a focused replication analysis in a larger European sample of 2663 cases and 13,780 control subjects (SGENE-plus study). Firstly, the discovery sample was genotyped with Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 and 572,888 markers were tested for schizophrenia association. No SNPs in the discovery sample attained genome-wide significance (P<8.7 x 10(-8)). Secondly, based on the GWAS data, we selected 1000 markers with the lowest P values in the discovery TOP sample, and tested these (or HapMap-based surrogates) for association in the replication sample. Sixteen loci were associated with schizophrenia (nominal P value<0.05 and concurring OR) in the replication sample. As a next step, we performed a combined analysis of the findings from these two studies, and the strongest evidence for association with schizophrenia was provided for markers rs7045881 on 9p21, rs433598 on 16p12 and rs10761482 on 10q21. The markers are located in PLAA, ACSM1 and ANK3, respectively. PLAA has not previously been described as a susceptibility gene, but 9p21 is implied as a schizophrenia linkage region. ACSM1 has been identified as a susceptibility gene in a previous schizophrenia GWAS study. The association of ANK3 with schizophrenia is intriguing in light of recent associations of ANK3 with bipolar disorder, thereby supporting the hypothesis of an overlap in genetic susceptibility between these psychopathological entities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2010.02.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3224994PMC
September 2010

A large replication study and meta-analysis in European samples provides further support for association of AHI1 markers with schizophrenia.

Hum Mol Genet 2010 Apr 12;19(7):1379-86. Epub 2010 Jan 12.

Research Institute of Biological Psychiatry, Copenhagen University Hospital, Roskilde, Denmark.

The Abelson helper integration site 1 (AHI1) gene locus on chromosome 6q23 is among a group of candidate loci for schizophrenia susceptibility that were initially identified by linkage followed by linkage disequilibrium mapping, and subsequent replication of the association in an independent sample. Here, we present results of a replication study of AHI1 locus markers, previously implicated in schizophrenia, in a large European sample (in total 3907 affected and 7429 controls). Furthermore, we perform a meta-analysis of the implicated markers in 4496 affected and 18,920 controls. Both the replication study of new samples and the meta-analysis show evidence for significant overrepresentation of all tested alleles in patients compared with controls (meta-analysis; P = 8.2 x 10(-5)-1.7 x 10(-3), common OR = 1.09-1.11). The region contains two genes, AHI1 and C6orf217, and both genes-as well as the neighbouring phosphodiesterase 7B (PDE7B)-may be considered candidates for involvement in the genetic aetiology of schizophrenia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/ddq009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2838541PMC
April 2010

Mixture model clustering of phenotype features reveals evidence for association of DTNBP1 to a specific subtype of schizophrenia.

Biol Psychiatry 2009 Dec 27;66(11):990-6. Epub 2009 Sep 27.

Department of Molecular Medicine, Helsinki, Finland.

Background: While DTNBP1, DISC1, and NRG1 have been extensively studied as candidate genes of schizophrenia, results remain inconclusive. Possible explanations for this are that the genes might be relevant only to certain subtypes of the disease and/or only in certain populations.

Methods: We performed unsupervised clustering of individuals from Finnish schizophrenia families, based on extensive clinical and neuropsychological data, including Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) information. Families with at least one affected member with DSM-IV diagnosis of a schizophrenia spectrum psychosis were included in a register-based ascertainment. Final sample consisted of 904 individuals from 288 families. We then used the cluster phenotypes in a genetic association study of candidate genes.

Results: A robust three-class clustering of individuals emerged: 1) psychotic disorder with mood symptoms (n = 172), 2) core schizophrenia (n = 223), and 3) absence of psychotic disorder (n = 509). One third of the individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia were assigned to cluster 1. These individuals had fewer negative and positive psychotic symptoms and cognitive deficits but more depressive symptoms than individuals in cluster 2. There was a significant association of cluster 2 cases with the DTNBP1 gene, while the DISC1 gene indicated a significant association with schizophrenia spectrum disorders based on the DSM-IV criteria.

Conclusions: In the Finnish population, DTNBP1 gene is associated with a schizophrenia phenotype characterized by prominent negative symptoms, generalized cognitive impairment, and few mood symptoms. Identification of genes and pathways related to schizophrenia necessitates novel definitions of disease phenotypes associated more directly with underlying biology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2009.05.034DOI Listing
December 2009

Common variants conferring risk of schizophrenia.

Nature 2009 Aug 1;460(7256):744-7. Epub 2009 Jul 1.

deCODE genetics, Sturlugata 8, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland.

Schizophrenia is a complex disorder, caused by both genetic and environmental factors and their interactions. Research on pathogenesis has traditionally focused on neurotransmitter systems in the brain, particularly those involving dopamine. Schizophrenia has been considered a separate disease for over a century, but in the absence of clear biological markers, diagnosis has historically been based on signs and symptoms. A fundamental message emerging from genome-wide association studies of copy number variations (CNVs) associated with the disease is that its genetic basis does not necessarily conform to classical nosological disease boundaries. Certain CNVs confer not only high relative risk of schizophrenia but also of other psychiatric disorders. The structural variations associated with schizophrenia can involve several genes and the phenotypic syndromes, or the 'genomic disorders', have not yet been characterized. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based genome-wide association studies with the potential to implicate individual genes in complex diseases may reveal underlying biological pathways. Here we combined SNP data from several large genome-wide scans and followed up the most significant association signals. We found significant association with several markers spanning the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region on chromosome 6p21.3-22.1, a marker located upstream of the neurogranin gene (NRGN) on 11q24.2 and a marker in intron four of transcription factor 4 (TCF4) on 18q21.2. Our findings implicating the MHC region are consistent with an immune component to schizophrenia risk, whereas the association with NRGN and TCF4 points to perturbation of pathways involved in brain development, memory and cognition.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature08186DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3077530PMC
August 2009

The genome-wide patterns of variation expose significant substructure in a founder population.

Am J Hum Genet 2008 Dec;83(6):787-94

Department of Molecular Medicine, National Public Health Institute and Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), Helsinki, Finland.

Although high-density SNP genotyping platforms generate a momentum for detailed genome-wide association (GWA) studies, an offshoot is a new insight into population genetics. Here, we present an example in one of the best-known founder populations by scrutinizing ten distinct Finnish early- and late-settlement subpopulations. By determining genetic distances, homozygosity, and patterns of linkage disequilibrium, we demonstrate that population substructure, and even individual ancestry, is detectable at a very high resolution and supports the concept of multiple historical bottlenecks resulting from consecutive founder effects. Given that genetic studies are currently aiming at identifying smaller and smaller genetic effects, recognizing and controlling for population substructure even at this fine level becomes imperative to avoid confounding and spurious associations. This study provides an example of the power of GWA data sets to demonstrate stratification caused by population history even within a seemingly homogeneous population, like the Finns. Further, the results provide interesting lessons concerning the impact of population history on the genome landscape of humans, as well as approaches to identify rare variants enriched in these subpopulations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2008.11.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2668058PMC
December 2008

Association of AKT1 with verbal learning, verbal memory, and regional cortical gray matter density in twins.

Am J Med Genet B Neuropsychiatr Genet 2009 Jul;150B(5):683-92

FIMM, Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland and National Public Health Institute, Biomedicum, Helsinki, Finland.

AKT1, encoding the protein kinase B, has been associated with the genetic etiology of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. However, minuscule data exist on the role of different alleles of AKT1 in measurable quantitative endophenotypes, such as cognitive abilities and neuroanatomical features, showing deviations in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. We evaluated the contribution of AKT1 to quantitative cognitive traits and 3D high-resolution neuroanatomical images in a Finnish twin sample consisting of 298 twins: 61 pairs with schizophrenia (8 concordant), 31 pairs with bipolar disorder (5 concordant) and 65 control pairs matched for age, sex and demographics. An AKT1 allele defined by the SNP rs1130214 located in the UTR of the gene revealed association with cognitive traits related to verbal learning and memory (P = 0.0005 for a composite index). This association was further fortified by a higher degree of resemblance of verbal memory capacity in pairs sharing the rs1130214 genotype compared to pairs not sharing the genotype. Furthermore, the same allele was also associated with decreased gray matter density in medial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (P < 0.05). Our findings support the role of AKT1 in the genetic background of cognitive and anatomical features, known to be affected by psychotic disorders. The established association of the same allelic variant of AKT1 with both cognitive and neuroanatomical aberrations could suggest that AKT1 exerts its effect on verbal learning and memory via neural networks involving prefrontal cortex.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.b.30890DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2708342PMC
July 2009

Disruption of the neurexin 1 gene is associated with schizophrenia.

Hum Mol Genet 2009 Mar 22;18(5):988-96. Epub 2008 Oct 22.

Division of Molecular and Clinical Neurobiology, Department of Psychiatry, Ludwig- Maximilians University, Munich, Germany.

Deletions within the neurexin 1 gene (NRXN1; 2p16.3) are associated with autism and have also been reported in two families with schizophrenia. We examined NRXN1, and the closely related NRXN2 and NRXN3 genes, for copy number variants (CNVs) in 2977 schizophrenia patients and 33 746 controls from seven European populations (Iceland, Finland, Norway, Germany, The Netherlands, Italy and UK) using microarray data. We found 66 deletions and 5 duplications in NRXN1, including a de novo deletion: 12 deletions and 2 duplications occurred in schizophrenia cases (0.47%) compared to 49 and 3 (0.15%) in controls. There was no common breakpoint and the CNVs varied from 18 to 420 kb. No CNVs were found in NRXN2 or NRXN3. We performed a Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel exact test to estimate association between all CNVs and schizophrenia (P = 0.13; OR = 1.73; 95% CI 0.81-3.50). Because the penetrance of NRXN1 CNVs may vary according to the level of functional impact on the gene, we next restricted the association analysis to CNVs that disrupt exons (0.24% of cases and 0.015% of controls). These were significantly associated with a high odds ratio (P = 0.0027; OR 8.97, 95% CI 1.8-51.9). We conclude that NRXN1 deletions affecting exons confer risk of schizophrenia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/ddn351DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2695245PMC
March 2009

Large recurrent microdeletions associated with schizophrenia.

Nature 2008 Sep;455(7210):232-6

CNS Division, deCODE genetics, Sturlugata 8, IS-101 Reykjavík, Iceland.

Reduced fecundity, associated with severe mental disorders, places negative selection pressure on risk alleles and may explain, in part, why common variants have not been found that confer risk of disorders such as autism, schizophrenia and mental retardation. Thus, rare variants may account for a larger fraction of the overall genetic risk than previously assumed. In contrast to rare single nucleotide mutations, rare copy number variations (CNVs) can be detected using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism arrays. This has led to the identification of CNVs associated with mental retardation and autism. In a genome-wide search for CNVs associating with schizophrenia, we used a population-based sample to identify de novo CNVs by analysing 9,878 transmissions from parents to offspring. The 66 de novo CNVs identified were tested for association in a sample of 1,433 schizophrenia cases and 33,250 controls. Three deletions at 1q21.1, 15q11.2 and 15q13.3 showing nominal association with schizophrenia in the first sample (phase I) were followed up in a second sample of 3,285 cases and 7,951 controls (phase II). All three deletions significantly associate with schizophrenia and related psychoses in the combined sample. The identification of these rare, recurrent risk variants, having occurred independently in multiple founders and being subject to negative selection, is important in itself. CNV analysis may also point the way to the identification of additional and more prevalent risk variants in genes and pathways involved in schizophrenia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature07229DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2687075PMC
September 2008

Association of a nonsynonymous variant of DAOA with visuospatial ability in a bipolar family sample.

Biol Psychiatry 2008 Sep 7;64(5):438-42. Epub 2008 May 7.

Department of Molecular Medicine, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.

Background: Bipolar disorder and schizophrenia are hypothesized to share some genetic background.

Methods: In a two-phase study, we evaluated the effect of five promising candidate genes for psychotic disorders, DAOA, COMT, DTNBP1, NRG1, and AKT1, on bipolar spectrum disorder, psychotic disorder, and related cognitive endophenotypes in a Finnish family-based sample ascertained for bipolar disorder.

Results: In initial screening of 362 individuals from 63 families, we found only marginal evidence for association with the diagnosis-based dichotomous classification. Those associations did not strengthen when we genotyped the complete sample of 723 individuals from 180 families. We observed a significant association of DAOA variants rs3916966 and rs2391191 with visuospatial ability (Quantitative Transmission Disequilibrium Test [QTDT]; p = 4 x 10(-6) and 5 x 10(-6), respectively) (n = 159) with the two variants in almost complete linkage disequilibrium. The COMT variant rs165599 also associated with visuospatial ability, and in our dataset, we saw an additive effect of DAOA and COMT variants on this neuropsychological trait.

Conclusions: The ancestral allele (Arg) of the nonsynonymous common DAOA variant rs2391191 (Arg30Lys) was found to predispose to impaired performance. The DAOA gene may play a role in predisposing individuals to a mixed phenotype of psychosis and mania and to impairments in related neuropsychological traits.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2008.03.028DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2685493PMC
September 2008

The role of DTNBP1, NRG1, and AKT1 in the genetics of schizophrenia in Finland.

Schizophr Res 2007 Mar 14;91(1-3):27-36. Epub 2007 Feb 14.

Department of Molecular Medicine, National Public Health Institute, Biomedicum, P.O. Box 104, FI-00251, Helsinki, Finland.

Several putative schizophrenia susceptibility genes have recently been identified. Significant associations between schizophrenia and neuregulin 1 (NRG1) and dysbindin (DTNBP1) were first reported in 2002 and studies in several populations have since independently reported positive associations to these gene regions. Further, both tentative functional and genetic data have implicated the role of AKT1 in the genetic background of this disorder. However, findings have not been consistent in all populations. We investigated the allelic diversity of these three genes NRG1, DTNBP1 and AKT1 in a representative nation-wide study sample of 441 Finnish schizophrenia families consisting of 865 affected individuals, in order to assess their role in one of the largest population-based study samples. DTNBP1 and AKT1 failed to show evidence of association, whereas two SNPs in the 3' region of the NRG1 gene yielded suggestive evidence of association (p=0.012 and p=0.048) in family-based association analyses. Thus, our study does not indicate that AKT1 or DTNBP1 play a role in the etiology of schizophrenia in the Finnish population. Furthermore, results do not support a major role for NRG1, but we cannot completely exclude a minor role of this gene in the Finnish population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2006.11.028DOI Listing
March 2007
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