Publications by authors named "Olivia Valdes"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Being nice and being mean: Friend characteristics foreshadow changes in perceptions of relationship negativity.

J Res Adolesc 2021 Feb 3. Epub 2021 Feb 3.

Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL, USA.

This study examines the proposition that friend characteristics forecast changes in perceptions of relationship negativity. The participants (ages 9 to 11) were 240 pre- and young adolescents (114 boys, 126 girls) involved in 120 same-sex best friendships that were stable across a period of 4 to 12 weeks. Each friend described perceptions of negativity in their relationship. Prosocial behavior and relational aggression were assessed via peer nominations. Dyadic analyses indicated that one friend's prosocial behavior and relational aggression uniquely forecast changes in the other friend's perception of negativity in the relationship. Greater initial levels of prosocial behavior anticipated decreases in perceived negativity, whereas greater initial levels of relational aggression forecast increases in perceived negativity.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jora.12604DOI Listing
February 2021

Math interest and self-concept among latino/a students: Reciprocal influences across the transition to middle school.

J Adolesc 2019 08 11;75:22-36. Epub 2019 Jul 11.

Department of Psychology, Florida Atlantic University, 3200 College Avenue, Davie, FL, 33431, USA. Electronic address:

Introduction: Psychological factors like math interest and self-concept typically decline between late childhood and early adolescence; both are key to math achievement. The present study examined the reciprocal interplay between math interest and self-concept across the transition into middle school, and whether associations are moderated by success attributions.

Methods: A total of 263 (120 boys, 143 girls) Latino students (M = 10.5 years at outset) from an agricultural community in California (USA) completed surveys at three time points, from the end of primary school to the first year of middle school. Surveys measured math self-concept and math interest, as well as attributions to success in math. Cross-lagged panel models examined possible bidirectional associations between math self-concept and math interest, and whether attributions of success moderated these association.

Results: Lower initial levels of math self-concept anticipated greater declines in math interest, an association that was buffered by attributions of math success. The smallest declines in math interest occurred among adolescents who had both the highest math self-concept and were most inclined to attribute success in math to internal factors like studying. These associations remained when potential confounding variables (e.g., school grades, conduct problems) were included.

Conclusion: The results replicate, in an understudied sample of Latino/a youth, the oft-reported link from low math self-concept to declining interest in math. Unique to this study is evidence of the protection afforded by belief in the efficacy of studying. The findings offer important guidance for teachers and parents seeking to mobilize resources for underperforming students.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.adolescence.2019.06.015DOI Listing
August 2019

Derisive Parenting Fosters Dysregulated Anger in Adolescent Children and Subsequent Difficulties with Peers.

J Youth Adolesc 2019 Aug 24;48(8):1567-1579. Epub 2019 May 24.

Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Box 1225, 751 42, Uppsala, Sweden.

Bullying and victimization are manifest in the peer social world, but have origins in the home. Uncertainty surrounds the mechanisms that convey problems between these settings. The present study describes the indirect transmission of hostility and coercion from parents to adolescent children through emotional dysregulation. In this model, derisive parenting-behaviors that demean or belittle children-fosters dysregulated anger, which precipitates peer difficulties. A total of 1409 participants (48% female; M = 13.4 years at the outset) were followed across secondary school (Grades 7-9) for three consecutive years. The results indicated that derisive parenting in Grade 7 was associated with increases in adolescent dysregulated anger from Grade 7 to 8, which, in turn, was associated with increases in bullying and victimization from Grade 8 to 9. The findings suggest that parents who are derisive, have children who struggle with emotional regulation and, ultimately, with constructive peer relationships.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10964-019-01040-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6693486PMC
August 2019

Examination of Heart Failure as a Predictor of Driving Cessation.

J Transp Health 2017 Dec 3;7(Pt B):202-208. Epub 2017 Nov 3.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, University of South Florida, 3515 E. Fletcher Ave., MDC 14, Tampa, FL 33613.

Cognitive dysfunction is a predictor of driving cessation in older adults and a common sequela of heart failure (HF). Although HF has been associated with an increased risk of driving cessation, the independent relationship between HF and driving cessation after cognitive function is considered remains to be established. The objective of these analyses is to examine HF as an independent predictor of driving cessation across three years among a cohort of older drivers in the United States. Analyses included 850 older adults who completed sensory, cognitive, and physical measures at baseline and mobility and health measures at a three-year follow-up. Cox regression was used to examine the effects of HF, stroke, vision, cognition, and physical function as predictors of incident driving cessation over three years. Participants with HF were over three times more likely to cease driving, = 3.19, 95% CI [1.27, 8.02], = .014. However, HF was no longer a significant predictor of driving cessation when cognitive performance was considered, = 1.70, 95% CI [0.67, 4.30], = .262. These findings suggest that the risk of driving cessation may be a consequence of the cognitive dysfunction associated with HF, rather than from HF itself. Cognitive training should be investigated among persons with HF to potentially prolong driving mobility.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jth.2017.10.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5851464PMC
December 2017

Maternal Psychological Control and Its Association with Mother and Child Perceptions of Adolescent Adjustment: More Evidence on the Strength of Shared Perspectives.

J Youth Adolesc 2016 10 21;45(10):2151-63. Epub 2016 Mar 21.

ETR Associates, 100 Enterprise Way, Suite G300, Scotts Valley, CA, 95066, USA.

Mothers and adolescents hold distinct albeit correlated views of their relationship and of one another. The present study focuses on disentangling these independent views. Concurrent associations between maternal psychological control and children's adjustment are examined at two time points in order to identify the degree to which associations reflect (a) views that are shared by mothers and adolescents, and (b) views that are unique to mothers and adolescents. A total of 123 (56 % female) U.S. Latino/a adolescents (M = 10.4 years old at the outset) and their mothers reported on maternal psychological control, children's conduct problems, and children's anxiety, twice within a 5-month period. Data were collected at the close of primary school when the adolescents were in grade 5 and again at the beginning of middle school, when they were in grade 6. Results from conventional correlations indicated that mother- and adolescent-reports yielded similar associations between maternal psychological control and adolescent adjustment. Common fate model analyses partitioned results into variance shared across mother and adolescent reports and variance unique to mother and adolescent reports. Results differed for anxiety and conduct problems. Shared views indicated that greater maternal psychological control was associated with heightened child conduct problems; there were no associations unique to either reporter. In contrast, unique reporter views indicated that greater maternal psychological control was associated with child anxiety; there were no associations involving shared views. Although mother- and adolescent-reports agree that maternal psychological control is correlated with children's adjustment, there is considerable divergence in results when associations are partitioned according to shared and unique reporter views. Associations between maternal psychological control and children's anxiety are more apt to be inflated by same-reporter variance bias than are associations between maternal psychological control and children's conduct problems.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10964-016-0467-5DOI Listing
October 2016