Publications by authors named "Olivia M Valdes"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Examination of Heart Failure as a Predictor of Driving Cessation.

J Transp Health 2017 Dec 3;7(Pt B):202-208. Epub 2017 Nov 3.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, University of South Florida, 3515 E. Fletcher Ave., MDC 14, Tampa, FL 33613.

Cognitive dysfunction is a predictor of driving cessation in older adults and a common sequela of heart failure (HF). Although HF has been associated with an increased risk of driving cessation, the independent relationship between HF and driving cessation after cognitive function is considered remains to be established. The objective of these analyses is to examine HF as an independent predictor of driving cessation across three years among a cohort of older drivers in the United States. Analyses included 850 older adults who completed sensory, cognitive, and physical measures at baseline and mobility and health measures at a three-year follow-up. Cox regression was used to examine the effects of HF, stroke, vision, cognition, and physical function as predictors of incident driving cessation over three years. Participants with HF were over three times more likely to cease driving, = 3.19, 95% CI [1.27, 8.02], = .014. However, HF was no longer a significant predictor of driving cessation when cognitive performance was considered, = 1.70, 95% CI [0.67, 4.30], = .262. These findings suggest that the risk of driving cessation may be a consequence of the cognitive dysfunction associated with HF, rather than from HF itself. Cognitive training should be investigated among persons with HF to potentially prolong driving mobility.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jth.2017.10.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5851464PMC
December 2017

Maternal Psychological Control and Its Association with Mother and Child Perceptions of Adolescent Adjustment: More Evidence on the Strength of Shared Perspectives.

J Youth Adolesc 2016 10 21;45(10):2151-63. Epub 2016 Mar 21.

ETR Associates, 100 Enterprise Way, Suite G300, Scotts Valley, CA, 95066, USA.

Mothers and adolescents hold distinct albeit correlated views of their relationship and of one another. The present study focuses on disentangling these independent views. Concurrent associations between maternal psychological control and children's adjustment are examined at two time points in order to identify the degree to which associations reflect (a) views that are shared by mothers and adolescents, and (b) views that are unique to mothers and adolescents. A total of 123 (56 % female) U.S. Latino/a adolescents (M = 10.4 years old at the outset) and their mothers reported on maternal psychological control, children's conduct problems, and children's anxiety, twice within a 5-month period. Data were collected at the close of primary school when the adolescents were in grade 5 and again at the beginning of middle school, when they were in grade 6. Results from conventional correlations indicated that mother- and adolescent-reports yielded similar associations between maternal psychological control and adolescent adjustment. Common fate model analyses partitioned results into variance shared across mother and adolescent reports and variance unique to mother and adolescent reports. Results differed for anxiety and conduct problems. Shared views indicated that greater maternal psychological control was associated with heightened child conduct problems; there were no associations unique to either reporter. In contrast, unique reporter views indicated that greater maternal psychological control was associated with child anxiety; there were no associations involving shared views. Although mother- and adolescent-reports agree that maternal psychological control is correlated with children's adjustment, there is considerable divergence in results when associations are partitioned according to shared and unique reporter views. Associations between maternal psychological control and children's anxiety are more apt to be inflated by same-reporter variance bias than are associations between maternal psychological control and children's conduct problems.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10964-016-0467-5DOI Listing
October 2016