Publications by authors named "Oliver Drees"

4 Publications

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Neuropathic and cAMP-induced pain behavior is ameliorated in mice lacking CNGB1.

Neuropharmacology 2020 07 6;171:108087. Epub 2020 Apr 6.

Institute of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacy, Goethe University, 60438, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels, which are directly activated by cAMP and cGMP, have long been known to play a key role in retinal and olfactory signal transduction. Emerging evidence indicates that CNG channels are also involved in signaling pathways important for pain processing. Here, we found that the expression of the channel subunits CNGA2, CNGA3, CNGA4 and CNGB1 in dorsal root ganglia, and of CNGA2 in the spinal cord, is transiently altered after peripheral nerve injury in mice. Specifically, we show using in situ hybridization and quantitative real-time RT-PCR that CNG channels containing the CNGB1b subunit are localized to populations of sensory neurons and predominantly excitatory interneurons in the spinal dorsal horn. In CNGB1 knockout (CNGB1) mice, neuropathic pain behavior is considerably attenuated whereas inflammatory pain behavior is normal. Finally, we provide evidence to support CNGB1 as a downstream mediator of cAMP signaling in pain pathways. Altogether, our data suggest that CNGB1-positive CNG channels specifically contribute to neuropathic pain processing after peripheral nerve injury.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropharm.2020.108087DOI Listing
July 2020

Distinct functions of soluble guanylyl cyclase isoforms NO-GC1 and NO-GC2 in inflammatory and neuropathic pain processing.

Pain 2019 Mar;160(3):607-618

Pharmakologisches Institut für Naturwissenschaftler, Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

A large body of evidence indicates that nitric oxide (NO)/cGMP signaling essentially contributes to the processing of chronic pain. In general, NO-induced cGMP formation is catalyzed by 2 isoforms of guanylyl cyclase, NO-sensitive guanylyl cyclase 1 (NO-GC1) and 2 (NO-GC2). However, the specific functions of the 2 isoforms in pain processing remain elusive. Here, we investigated the distribution of NO-GC1 and NO-GC2 in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia, and we characterized the behavior of mice lacking either isoform in animal models of pain. Using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, we demonstrate that both isoforms are localized to interneurons in the spinal dorsal horn with NO-GC1 being enriched in inhibitory interneurons. In dorsal root ganglia, the distribution of NO-GC1 and NO-GC2 is restricted to non-neuronal cells with NO-GC2 being the major isoform in satellite glial cells. Mice lacking NO-GC1 demonstrated reduced hypersensitivity in models of neuropathic pain, whereas their behavior in models of inflammatory pain was normal. By contrast, mice lacking NO-GC2 exhibited increased hypersensitivity in models of inflammatory pain, but their neuropathic pain behavior was unaltered. Cre-mediated deletion of NO-GC1 or NO-GC2 in spinal dorsal horn neurons recapitulated the behavioral phenotypes observed in the global knockout. Together, these results indicate that cGMP produced by NO-GC1 or NO-GC2 in spinal dorsal horn neurons exert distinct, and partly opposing, functions in chronic pain processing.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/j.pain.0000000000001440DOI Listing
March 2019

The Absence of Sensory Axon Bifurcation Affects Nociception and Termination Fields of Afferents in the Spinal Cord.

Front Mol Neurosci 2018 8;11:19. Epub 2018 Feb 8.

Developmental Neurobiology, Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association, Berlin, Germany.

A cGMP signaling cascade composed of C-type natriuretic peptide, the guanylyl cyclase receptor Npr2 and cGMP-dependent protein kinase I (cGKI) controls the bifurcation of sensory axons upon entering the spinal cord during embryonic development. However, the impact of axon bifurcation on sensory processing in adulthood remains poorly understood. To investigate the functional consequences of impaired axon bifurcation during adult stages we generated conditional mouse mutants of Npr2 and cGKI ( and ) that lack sensory axon bifurcation in the absence of additional phenotypes observed in the global knockout mice. Cholera toxin labeling in digits of the hind paw demonstrated an altered shape of sensory neuron termination fields in the spinal cord of conditional Npr2 mouse mutants. Behavioral testing of both sexes indicated that noxious heat sensation and nociception induced by chemical irritants are impaired in the mutants, whereas responses to cold sensation, mechanical stimulation, and motor coordination are not affected. Recordings from C-fiber nociceptors in the hind limb skin showed that Npr2 function was not required to maintain normal heat sensitivity of peripheral nociceptors. Thus, the altered behavioral responses to noxious heat found in mice is not due to an impaired C-fiber function. Overall, these data point to a critical role of axonal bifurcation for the processing of pain induced by heat or chemical stimuli.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnmol.2018.00019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5809486PMC
February 2018

K3.1 channels modulate the processing of noxious chemical stimuli in mice.

Neuropharmacology 2017 Oct 18;125:386-395. Epub 2017 Aug 18.

Pharmakologisches Institut für Naturwissenschaftler, Goethe-Universität, Fachbereich Biochemie, Chemie und Pharmazie, 60438 Frankfurt am Main, Germany; Institut für Pharmakologie und Toxikologie, Universität Witten/Herdecke, ZBAF, 58453 Witten, Germany.

Intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (K3.1) have been recently implicated in pain processing. However, the functional role and localization of K3.1 in the nociceptive system are largely unknown. We here characterized the behavior of mice lacking K3.1 (K3.1) in various pain models and analyzed the expression pattern of K3.1 in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and the spinal cord. K3.1 mice demonstrated normal behavioral responses in models of acute nociceptive, persistent inflammatory, and persistent neuropathic pain. However, their behavioral responses to noxious chemical stimuli such as formalin and capsaicin were increased. Accordingly, formalin-induced nociceptive behavior was increased in wild-type mice after administration of the K3.1 inhibitor TRAM-34. In situ hybridization experiments detected K3.1 in most DRG satellite glial cells, in a minority of DRG neurons, and in ependymal cells lining the central canal of the spinal cord. Together, our data point to a specific inhibitory role of K3.1 for the processing of noxious chemical stimuli.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropharm.2017.08.021DOI Listing
October 2017
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