Publications by authors named "Oleg Garifulin"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Covalent Aurora A regulation by the metabolic integrator coenzyme A.

Redox Biol 2020 01 5;28:101318. Epub 2019 Sep 5.

Department of Structural and Molecular Biology, University College London, London, WC1E 6BT, UK; Department of Cell Signaling, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Kyiv 143, Ukraine. Electronic address:

Aurora A kinase is a master mitotic regulator whose functions are controlled by several regulatory interactions and post-translational modifications. It is frequently dysregulated in cancer, making Aurora A inhibition a very attractive antitumor target. However, recently uncovered links between Aurora A, cellular metabolism and redox regulation are not well understood. In this study, we report a novel mechanism of Aurora A regulation in the cellular response to oxidative stress through CoAlation. A combination of biochemical, biophysical, crystallographic and cell biology approaches revealed a new and, to our knowledge, unique mode of Aurora A inhibition by CoA, involving selective binding of the ADP moiety of CoA to the ATP binding pocket and covalent modification of Cys290 in the activation loop by the thiol group of the pantetheine tail. We provide evidence that covalent CoA modification (CoAlation) of Aurora A is specific, and that it can be induced by oxidative stress in human cells. Oxidising agents, such as diamide, hydrogen peroxide and menadione were found to induce Thr 288 phosphorylation and DTT-dependent dimerization of Aurora A. Moreover, microinjection of CoA into fertilized mouse embryos disrupts bipolar spindle formation and the alignment of chromosomes, consistent with Aurora A inhibition. Altogether, our data reveal CoA as a new, rather selective, inhibitor of Aurora A, which locks this kinase in an inactive state via a "dual anchor" mechanism of inhibition that might also operate in cellular response to oxidative stress. Finally and most importantly, we believe that these novel findings provide a new rationale for developing effective and irreversible inhibitors of Aurora A, and perhaps other protein kinases containing appropriately conserved Cys residues.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.redox.2019.101318DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6812009PMC
January 2020

Preliminary study of thyroid and colon cancers-associated antigens and their cognate autoantibodies as potential cancer biomarkers.

Biomarkers 2012 Jun 22;17(4):362-71. Epub 2012 May 22.

Department of Cell Signaling, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics NAS of Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine.

Background: Autoantibodies, which are produced against tumor-associated antigens, are potential tumor markers and attract a growing interest for cancer detection, differential diagnostics and prognosis.

Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic significance of 40 antigens identified by immunoscreening of cDNA libraries from thyroid and colon cancers by allogenic screening with different tumor types patients' sera.

Method: Plaque-spot serological assay.

Results: Increased frequency of antibody response in sera of cancer patients compared with that of healthy donors was shown toward 14 antigens, 8 of which (CG016, BTN3A3, FKBP4, XRCC4, TSGA2, ACTR1A, FXYD3 and CTSH) have revealed exclusively cancer-related serological profile.

Conclusion: Allogenic screening of 40 SEREX-antigens with sera from cancer patients and healthy donors allowed us to reveal 14 antigens with potential diagnostic significance. These antigens and their cognate autoantibodies could be considered as valuable targets for further analysis as potential cancer biomarkers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/1354750X.2012.677476DOI Listing
June 2012

Listeria monocytogenes infection induces prosurvival metabolic signaling in macrophages.

Infect Immun 2011 Apr 24;79(4):1526-35. Epub 2011 Jan 24.

Program in Gene Function and Expression and Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA.

Host cells use metabolic signaling through the LXRα nuclear receptor to defend against Listeria monocytogenes infection. 25-Hydroxycholesterol is a natural ligand of LXRs that is produced by the enzyme cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (CH25H). We found that expression of Ch25h is upregulated following L. monocytogenes infection in a beta interferon (IFN-β)-dependent fashion. Moreover, increased Ch25h expression promotes survival of L. monocytogenes-infected cells and increases sensitivity of the host to infection. We determined that expression of Cd5l, a prosurvival gene, is controlled by CH25H. In addition, we found that CD5L inhibits activation of caspase-1, promoting survival of infected macrophages. Our results reveal a mechanism by which an intracellular pathogen can prolong survival of infected cells, thus providing itself with a protected environment in which to replicate.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/IAI.01195-10DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3067555PMC
April 2011

Resistance of Haemophilus influenzae to reactive nitrogen donors and gamma interferon-stimulated macrophages requires the formate-dependent nitrite reductase regulator-activated ytfE gene.

Infect Immun 2009 May 16;77(5):1945-58. Epub 2009 Mar 16.

Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Ave., N., S6-242, Worcester, MA 01655, USA.

Haemophilus influenzae efficiently colonizes and persists at the human nasopharyngeal mucosa, causing disease when it spreads to other sites. Nitric oxide (NO) represents a major antimicrobial defense deployed by host cells in locations colonized by H. influenzae during pathogenesis that are likely to vary in oxygen levels. Formate-dependent nitrite reductase regulator (FNR) is an oxygen-sensitive regulator in several bacterial pathogens. We report that fnr of H. influenzae is required for anaerobic defense against exposure to NO donors and to resist NO-dependent effects of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-activated murine bone marrow-derived macrophages. To understand the mechanism of resistance, we investigated the role of FNR-regulated genes in defense against NO sources. Expression analysis revealed FNR-dependent activation of nrfA, dmsA, napA, and ytfE. Nonpolar deletion mutants of nrfA and ytfE exhibited sensitivity to NO donors, and the ytfE gene was more critical for survival. Compared to the wild-type strain, the ytfE mutant exhibited decreased survival when exposed to macrophages, a defect that was more pronounced after prior stimulation of macrophages with IFN-gamma or lipopolysaccharide. Complementation restored survival of the mutant to the level in the parental strain. Increased sensitivity of the ytfE mutant relative to that of the parent was abrogated by treatment of macrophages with a NO synthase inhibitor, implicating YtfE in resistance to a NO-dependent pathway. These results identify a requirement for FNR in positive control of ytfE and indicate a critical role for ytfE in resistance of H. influenzae to reactive nitrogen species and the antibacterial effects of macrophages.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/IAI.01365-08DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2681730PMC
May 2009

Irf3 polymorphism alters induction of interferon beta in response to Listeria monocytogenes infection.

PLoS Genet 2007 Sep 20;3(9):1587-97. Epub 2007 Jul 20.

Program in Gene Function and Expression, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA.

Genetic makeup of the host plays a significant role in the course and outcome of infection. Inbred strains of mice display a wide range of sensitivities to Listeria monocytogenes infection and thus serve as a good model for analysis of the effect of genetic polymorphism. The outcome of L. monocytogenes infection in mice is influenced by the ability of this bacterium to induce expression of interferon beta mRNA, encoded in mouse by the Ifnb1 (interferon beta 1, fibroblast) gene. Mouse strains that lack components of the IFN beta signaling pathway are substantially more resistant to infection. We found that macrophages from the ByJ substrain of the common C57BL/6 inbred strain of mice are impaired in their ability to induce Ifnb1 expression in response to bacterial and viral infections. We mapped the locus that controls differential expression of Ifnb1 to a region on Chromosome 7 that includes interferon regulatory factor 3 (Irf3), which encodes a transcription factor responsible for early induction of Ifnb1 expression. In C57BL/6ByJ mice, Irf3 mRNA was inefficiently spliced, with a significant proportion of the transcripts retaining intron 5. Analysis of the Irf3 locus identified a single base-pair polymorphism and revealed that intron 5 of Irf3 is spliced by the atypical U12-type spliceosome. We found that the polymorphism disrupts a U12-type branchpoint and has a profound effect on the efficiency of splicing of Irf3. We demonstrate that a naturally occurring change in the splicing control element has a dramatic effect on the resistance to L. monocytogenes infection. Thus, the C57BL/6ByJ mouse strain serves as an example of how a mammalian host can counter bacterial virulence strategies by introducing subtle alteration of noncoding sequences.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.0030152DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1971118PMC
September 2007

Listeria monocytogenes as a probe of immune function.

Brief Funct Genomic Proteomic 2005 Nov;4(3):258-69

Program in Gene Function and Expression, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 364 Plantation St, Worcester, MA 01605, USA.

For almost half a century, the mouse model of Listeria monocytogenes infection has been used to analyse both innate and adaptive components of immunity and to discover key immune genes. Vast accumulated knowledge about the disease in mice provides a unique framework for identifying and characterising immune molecules using a variety of experimental approaches. To illustrate the range of questions that can be addressed using modern genetics and genomics tools, the authors provide an overview of the analysis of components of immune signalling networks using the mouse model of L. monocytogenes infection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bfgp/4.3.258DOI Listing
November 2005

Downregulation of putative tumor suppressor gene TSC-22 in human brain tumors.

J Surg Oncol 2003 Jan;82(1):57-64

Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Kiev, Ukraine.

Background And Objectives: Our objective was to identify differentially expressed genes involved in the pathogenesis of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM).

Methods: Screening of arrayed human fetal brain and human postnatal brain cDNA libraries was performed by differential hybridization with glioblastoma multiforme and human normal brain cDNAs.

Results: Repeated differential hybridization of more than 100 cDNA clones selected by primary screening and analysis of RNA from adult normal brain and glial tumors showed 16 nucleotide sequences differentially expressed between normal brain and brain tumors. Among others, decreased content in astrocytic tumors was determined for TSC-22 mRNA corresponding to cDNA in the ICRFp507J1041 clone from human fetal brain cDNA library. Northern blot hybridization of RNA from different human brain tumors showed very low amounts of TSC-22 mRNA in most investigated samples of GBM, anaplastic astrocytoma, and some other tumors. Complete lack of expression of TSC-22 occurred in one sample of anaplastic astrocytoma, as well as in meningioma, brain sarcoma, sarcomatous meningioma, and oligodendroglioma. The differential expression of TSC-22 gene was confirmed by semiquantitative RT-PCR in 15 samples of astrocytomas WHO grade II-IV and three samples of normal brain.

Conclusions: Significantly decreased levels of TSC-22 mRNA in human brain and salivary gland tumors and antiproliferative role of TSC-22 strongly suggest a tumor suppressor role for TSC-22. J.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jso.10180DOI Listing
January 2003