Publications by authors named "Olayinka Rasheed Ibrahim"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

COVID-19 in children: a case series from Nigeria.

Pan Afr Med J 2020 28;35(Suppl 2):53. Epub 2020 May 28.

Department of Community Medicine Amadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria.

Introduction: The global spread of COVID-19 remains unabated in the past few months with a rise in the number of available literature on the novel virus. There are very few paediatric studies and are mainly from developed countries with a paucity of information on the clinical manifestation of COVID-19 disease in African children, including Nigeria.

Methods: We described the clinical presentation, laboratory findings, treatment and outcome in a group of five Nigerian children managed at a COVID-19 isolation and treatment centre in Nigeria.

Results: We managed a total of five children with an age range of 3 months to 8 years in the last four weeks (16th April to 15th May 2020). Three of the five children were males. All the children had close contact with family members that tested positive for COVID-19. Out of the five children, one had moderate disease, three had mild symptomatic disease, and one was asymptomatic. Two out of the five children had lymphocytosis. Out of the four children who had chest radiograph, two had features of pneumonia.

Conclusion: COVID-19 is not uncommon in Nigerian children, and all had a confirmed family member with COVID-19. Besides, contrary to leucopaenia with lymphopaenia observed in the adult's population, we found lymphocytosis in this cohort and about 50.0% had pneumonic changes on chest radiograph.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11604/pamj.supp.2020.35.2.23597DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7875722PMC
March 2021

Epidemiology of COVID-19 and Predictors of Outcome in Nigeria: A Single-Center Study.

Am J Trop Med Hyg 2020 Dec 26;103(6):2376-2381. Epub 2020 Oct 26.

Department of Pediatrics, University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria.

There is a paucity of information regarding the epidemiology and outcome of COVID-19 from low/middle-income countries, including from Nigeria. This single-center study described the clinical features, laboratory findings, and predictors of in-hospital mortality of COVID-19 patients. Patients admitted between April 10, 2020 and June 10, 2020 were included. Forty-five patients with a mean age of 43 (16) years, predominantly male (87%), presented with fever (38%), cough (29%), or dyspnea (24%). In-hospital mortality was 16%. The independent predictors of mortality were hypoxemia (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 2.5; 95% CI: 1.3-5.1) and creatinine > 1.5 mg/dL (aOR: 4.3; 95% CI: 1.9-9.8).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.20-0759DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7695094PMC
December 2020

Long-term survival of children following acute peritoneal dialysis in a resource-limited setting.

Kidney Res Clin Pract 2020 Dec;39(4):469-478

Department of Internal Medicine, Bowen University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria & Bowen University College of Medicine, Ogbomosho, Nigeria.

Background: There is a paucity of data on long term-outcomes of children who undergo acute peritoneal dialysis (PD) in resource-limited settings. We reviewed the outcomes of children who underwent PD after 18 months of follow-up.

Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study in children with acute kidney injury (AKI) who underwent PD. Diagnosis of AKI was based on the 2012 Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes definition. We assessed outcomes of in-hospital mortality, 18-month post-dialysis survival, factors associated with survival, and progression to chronic kidney disease (CKD).

Results: Twenty-nine children with a median age of 6 (3 to 11) years underwent acute PD. In-hospital mortality was 3/29 (10.3%) and rose to 27.6% during follow-up. Seven (24.1%) children were lost to follow-up. Of the 14 remaining children, six (42.9%) experienced full recovery of renal function, while eight (57.1%) progressed to CKD. Among those who experienced full recovery, median (interquartile range) estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) rose from 12.67 (7.05, 22.85) mL/min/1.73 m2 to 95.56 (64.50, 198.00) mL/min/1.73 m2, P = 0.031. No significant changes in median eGFR from baseline were observed among those who progressed to CKD (P = 0.383) or in non-survivors (P = 0.838). According to Kaplan-Meier curve analyses, 18-month survival during follow-up was 66.0% (95% CI, 45.0% to 86.5%). Age < 5 was associated with greater likelihood of survival (OR, 3.217; 95% CI, 1.240 to 8.342).

Conclusion: Progression of post-PD AKI to CKD occurred in more than half of survivors. Age < 5 was associated with greater likelihood of survival.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.23876/j.krcp.20.055DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7770994PMC
December 2020

A four-year-old Nigerian boy with battered child syndrome: implications for public health.

Pan Afr Med J 2020 18;35:47. Epub 2020 Feb 18.

Department of Pediatrics, Federal Medical Centre, Katsina, Katsina State, Nigeria.

Battered child syndrome (BCS) is a form of physical abuse that is characterised by multiple injuries and potentially fatal outcome. Despite the high prevalence of physical abuse in developing countries, BCS is rarely reported. Hence, this report highlighted a four-year-old Nigerian boy who suffered multiple injuries (scalp haematoma, bruises, right clavicular fracture, and burns) from the paternal uncle's wife. This case report is discussed along the line of public health approach for curbing the social menace.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11604/pamj.2020.35.47.19115DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7250214PMC
December 2020

Diabetic-ketoacidosis in a nine-year-old child with homozygous sickle cell anaemia: a rare case report.

Pan Afr Med J 2019 7;33. Epub 2019 May 7.

Department of Paediatrics, Federal Medical Centre, Katsina State, Nigeria.

Sickle cell anaemia (SCA) and type 1 diabetes mellitus (type 1 DM) are chronic medical conditions whose co-existence is uncommon in childhood. Furthermore, complications of SCA such as mesenteric crisis typically present with abdominal pain, which is also common in children with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and this may possess diagnostic challenge. Herewith in, we report a rare case of a nine-year-old child with homozygous sickle cell anaemia, who presented with features of mesenteric crisis and diabetic ketoacidosis. The DKA was diagnosed based on the presence of hyperglycaemia (32.2 mmol/L), ketonaemia (4.6 mmol/L) and acidosis (11.6 mmol/L). The fluids deficit was corrected over 24 hours, with improvement in the vaso-occlusive crises (VOC) without precipitating cerebral oedema.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11604/pamj.2019.33.7.18971DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6607464PMC
July 2019

Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Thrombus in a Child with Dilated Cardiomyopathy: An Atypical Location.

J Cardiovasc Echogr 2017 Jul-Sep;27(3):101-103

Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Kwara State, Nigeria.

Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) may be associated with formation of intracardiac thrombi which may embolize and result in life-threatening complications. We present a 19-month-old female child with DCM who presented with a right hemispheric cerebrovascular accident. Urgent echocardiography revealed poor left ventricular systolic function and a thrombus attached to the interventricular septum along the left ventricular outflow tract. There was resolution of the thrombus following the use of warfarin.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/jcecho.jcecho_46_16DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5516439PMC
August 2017
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