Publications by authors named "Olav Erich Yri"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Surgery for brain metastases - real-world prognostic factors' association with survival.

Acta Oncol 2021 May 25:1-8. Epub 2021 May 25.

Deparment of Oncology, Regional Advisory Unit for Palliative Care, Oslo University Hospital (OUH), Oslo, Norway.

Background: Surgical resection of brain metastases (BM) improves overall survival (OS) in selected patients. Selecting those patients likely to benefit from surgery is challenging. The Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA) and the diagnosis-specific Graded Prognostic Assessment (ds-GPA) were developed to predict survival in patients with BM, but not specifically to guide patient selection for surgery. Our aim was to evaluate the feasibility of preoperative GPA/ds-GPA scores and assess variables associated with OS.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed first-time surgical resection of BM from solid tumors at a Norwegian regional referral center from 2011 to 2018.

Results: Of 590 patients, 51% were female and median age was 63 years. Median OS was 10.3 months and 74 patients (13%) died within three months after surgery. Preoperatively tumor origin was unknown in 20% of patients. A GPA score could be calculated for 92% of the patients preoperatively, but could not correctly predict survival. A ds-GPA score could be calculated for 46% of patients. Multivariable regression analysis revealed shorter OS in patients with higher age, worse functioning status, colorectal primary cancer compared to lung cancer, presence of extracranial metastases, and more than four BM. Patients with preoperative progressive extracranial disease or synchronous BM had shorter OS compared to patients with stable extracranial disease.

Conclusion: Ds-GPA could be calculated in less than half of patients preoperatively and GPA poorly identified patients which had minimal benefit of surgery. Including status of extracranial disease improve prognostication and therefore selection to surgery for brain metastases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0284186X.2021.1930150DOI Listing
May 2021

Overall survival after initial radiotherapy for brain metastases; a population based study of 2140 patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

Acta Oncol 2021 Aug 25;60(8):1054-1060. Epub 2021 May 25.

Department of Oncology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.

Background: Brain metastases (BM) occur in about 30% of all patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). BM treatment guidelines recommend more frequent use of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Overall, studies report no difference in overall survival (OS) comparing SRT to whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT). We examined survival after radiotherapy for BM in a population-based sample from the South-Eastern Norway Regional Health Authority treated 2006-2018.

Methods: We reviewed electronic medical records of 2140 NSCLC patients treated with SRT or WBRT for BM from 2006-2018. Overall survival (OS) was compared to predicted survival according to the prognostic systems DS-GPA and Lung-molGPA.

Results: Use of SRT increased during the period, from 19% (2006-2014) to 45% (2015-2018). Median OS for all patients was 3.0 months, increasing from 2.0 (2006) to 4.0 (2018). Median OS after SRT was 7.0 months ( = 435) and 3.0 months after WBRT ( = 1705). Twenty-seven percent of SRT patients and 50% of WBRT patients died within 90 days after start of RT. Age ≥70, male sex, KPS ≤70, non-adenocarcinoma histology, ECM present, multiple BM, and WBRT were associated with shorter survival ( < .001). Actual mOS corresponded best with predicted mOS by DS-GPA and Lung-molGPA for the SRT group.

Conclusion: Overall survival after radiotherapy (RT) for BM improved during the study period, but only for patients treated with SRT. Survival after WBRT remains poor; its use should be questioned. DS-GPA and Lung-molGPA seem most useful in predicting prognosis considered for SRT.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0284186X.2021.1924399DOI Listing
August 2021

Cotargeting of CYP-19 (aromatase) and emerging, pivotal signalling pathways in metastatic breast cancer.

Br J Cancer 2017 01 6;116(1):10-20. Epub 2016 Dec 6.

Department of Oncology, Akershus University Hospital (AHUS), Lørenskog N-1478, Norway.

Aromatase inhibition is one of the cornerstones of modern endocrine therapy of oestrogen receptor-positive (ER+) metastatic breast cancer (MBC). The nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitors anastrozole and letrozole, as well as the steroidal aromatase inactivator exemestane, are the preferred drugs and established worldwide in all clinical phases of the disease. However, although many patients suffering from MBC experience an initial stabilisation of their metastatic burden, drug resistance and disease progression occur frequently, following in general only a few months on treatment. Extensive translational research during the past two decades has elucidated the major pathways contributing to endocrine resistance and paved the way for clinical studies investigating the efficacy of novel drug combinations involving aromatase inhibitors and emerging drugable targets like mTOR, PI3K and CDK4/6. The present review summarises the basic research that provided the rationale for new drug combinations involving aromatase inhibitors and the main findings of pivotal clinical trials that have already started to change our way to treat hormone-sensitive MBC. The challenging situation of oestrogen receptor-positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive (HER2+) MBC is also shortly reviewed to underline the complexity of the clinical scenario in the heterogeneous subgroups of hormone receptor-positive breast cancer patients and the increasing need for personalised medicine. Finally, we summarise some of the promising findings made with the combination of aromatase inhibitors with other potent endocrine treatment options like fulvestrant, a selective oestrogen receptor downregulator.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/bjc.2016.405DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5220158PMC
January 2017

Rituximab blocks protective serologic response to influenza A (H1N1) 2009 vaccination in lymphoma patients during or within 6 months after treatment.

Blood 2011 Dec 4;118(26):6769-71. Epub 2011 Nov 4.

Clinic for Surgery and Cancer Medicine, Department of Oncology, Oslo University Hospital, Norway.

Cancer patients are often encouraged to receive seasonal influenza vaccination. The monoclonal antibody rituximab is widely used in treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. This results in a prolonged depletion of normal B cells, which might impair humoral responses. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether lymphoma patients undergoing rituximab-containing treatment regimens or having received such regimens within the past 6 months were able to mount protective antibody responses to the influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus vaccine Pandemrix during the 2009 "swine flu" pandemic. Contrary to the control group, where 82% responded adequately to the vaccine, none of the 67 patients achieved protective antibody titers, suggesting that lymphoma patients receiving rituximab-containing regimens might not benefit from this vaccine. It is important that doctors who care for such patients are aware that they may fail to respond not only to the influenza vaccine, but also to other common vaccines.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2011-08-372649DOI Listing
December 2011

Mantle cell lymphoma with features of marginal-zone lymphoma.

J Hematop 2011 Mar 2;4(1):7-11. Epub 2011 Mar 2.

Department of Pathology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, 0310 Oslo, Norway.

We present seven cases of mantle cell lymphoma with morphological features of marginal-zone lymphoma. Of particular interest, four of the patients had predominant involvement of the gastrointestinal tract. All cases displayed the translocation t(11;14)(q13;q32) and expressed cyclin D1. Cytogenetic analysis revealed trisomy 3 in one case and somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin heavy genes could be demonstrated in two out of four cases. The latter features are reminiscent of marginal-zone lymphoma. The localization of these lymphomas mainly in the gastrointestinal tract and the higher exposure to antigens in this area may explain why this variant of mantle cell lymphoma harbours features of marginal-zone lymphoma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12308-011-0084-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4102821PMC
March 2011

Failure to achieve castration levels in patients using leuprolide acetate in locally advanced prostate cancer.

Eur Urol 2006 Jan 15;49(1):54-8; discussion 58. Epub 2005 Nov 15.

Department of Oncology, Rikshospitalet-Radiumhospitalet Health Enterprise, Montebello, 0310 Oslo, Norway.

Objective: In a cross-sectional, retrospective, non-randomised study to investigate the possibility that some patients treated with luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analogues (LHRH analogues) fail to reach castration levels of serum testosterone.

Methods: 40 patients treated with a 3-monthly formulation of leuprolide acetate and continuous use of an oral antiandrogen ("Leu group") and 25 patients treated with a 3-monthly formulation of goserelin acetate and an oral antiandrogen for one month ("Gos group") were identified from our hospital's registry. Serum testosterone was measured during treatment with the respective LHRH-analogue and compared between the two groups. In the Leu group, serum testosterone was measured during week 11 or 12 of treatment. In the Gos group, serum testosterone was assessed during week 23 or 24.

Results: Four patients (10%) treated with leuprolide acetate failed to reach the castration level of serum testosterone after treatment with one injection of a three-monthly formulation of leuprolide acetate. All patients treated with goserelin acetate achieved the castration level.

Conclusion: Although the overwhelming majority of prostate cancer patients during treatment of LHRH analogue achieve serum testosterone values within the castration range, individual patients may fail to reach this therapeutic goal, probably more often during treatment with leuprolide acetate than with goserelin acetate.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eururo.2005.09.009DOI Listing
January 2006

Characterization of receptor-interacting protein RIP140 in the regulation of SF-1 responsive target genes.

Mol Cell Endocrinol 2003 May;203(1-2):91-103

Department of Clinical Biochemistry, The Hormone Laboratory, Haukeland University Hospital, University of Bergen, N-5021 Bergen, Norway.

Receptor-interacting protein (RIP) 140 interacts with several nuclear receptors, but its function in regulation of nuclear receptor action has been debated. Here we have examined the role of RIP140 in regulation of Steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1)-dependent transcription. SF-1 interacts with RIP140 through its activation function-2 (AF-2) domain. Several domains of RIP140 interact directly with SF-1, but the carboxyl-terminal region containing 4 of its 9 LXXLL motifs showed the strongest SF-1 interaction. Coexpression of RIP140 and SF-1 in different cell types demonstrated that RIP140 acts as a potent corepressor of transcription from the SF-1 responsive cAMP regulatory sequence 2 (CRS2) element of the CYP17 gene and a variety of SF-1 responsive promoter genes. RIP140 also counteracted the stimulatory action of p160/SRC coactivators. The inhibitory effect of RIP140 was partially reversed by Trichostatin A, suggesting a role of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in RIP140-mediated repression of SF-1. Quantitation of endogenous coregulator mRNA levels revealed cell type specific differences that could affect the repressor action by overexpressed RIP140.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0303-7207(03)00097-2DOI Listing
May 2003
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