Publications by authors named "Olaf Andreatta"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Smartphone-based self-monitoring in bipolar disorder: evaluation of usability and feasibility of two systems.

Int J Bipolar Disord 2019 Jan 4;7(1). Epub 2019 Jan 4.

Copenhagen Affective Disorder Research Center (CADIC), Psychiatric Center Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Background: The aims of the present multicenter pilot study were to examine the feasibility and usability of two different smartphone-based monitoring systems (the Pulso system and the Trilogis-Monsenso system) from two IT companies in patients with bipolar disorder, developed and selected to be testes as a part of a European Union funded Pre-Commercial Procurement (the NYMPHA-MD project).

Methods: Patients with bipolar disorder (ICD-10), > 18 years of age during a remitted, partial remitted or mild to moderate depressive state (HDRS-17 < 25) from Italy, Spain and Denmark were included. Patients were randomized 1:1 to the use of one of two smartphone-based monitoring systems. The randomization was stratified according to study location (Italy, Spain, Denmark) and all patients were followed for a 4 weeks study period. Usability and feasibility were evaluated using the Computer System Usability Questionnaire, and the Usefulness, Satisfaction, and Ease of use Questionnaire.

Results: A total of 60 patients aged 18-69 years with bipolar disorder (ICD-10) recruited from Italy, Spain, Denmark were included-59 patients completed the study. In Denmark, the patients evaluated the Trilogis-Monsenso system with a statistically significant higher usability compared with the Pulso system. In Italy and Spain, the patients evaluated no statistically significant difference between the two systems in any of the categories, except for the usefulness category favoring the Trilogis-Monsenso system (z = 2.68, p < 0.01).

Conclusions: Both monitoring systems showed acceptable usability and feasibility. There were differences in patient-based evaluations of the two monitoring systems related to the country of the study. Studies investigating the usability and feasibility during longer follow-up periods could perhaps reveal different findings. Future randomized controlled trials investigating the possible positive and negative effects of smartphone-based monitoring systems are needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40345-018-0134-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6320330PMC
January 2019

Smartphone-based self-monitoring in bipolar disorder: evaluation of usability and feasibility of two systems.

Int J Bipolar Disord 2019 Jan 4;7(1). Epub 2019 Jan 4.

Copenhagen Affective Disorder Research Center (CADIC), Psychiatric Center Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Background: The aims of the present multicenter pilot study were to examine the feasibility and usability of two different smartphone-based monitoring systems (the Pulso system and the Trilogis-Monsenso system) from two IT companies in patients with bipolar disorder, developed and selected to be testes as a part of a European Union funded Pre-Commercial Procurement (the NYMPHA-MD project).

Methods: Patients with bipolar disorder (ICD-10), > 18 years of age during a remitted, partial remitted or mild to moderate depressive state (HDRS-17 < 25) from Italy, Spain and Denmark were included. Patients were randomized 1:1 to the use of one of two smartphone-based monitoring systems. The randomization was stratified according to study location (Italy, Spain, Denmark) and all patients were followed for a 4 weeks study period. Usability and feasibility were evaluated using the Computer System Usability Questionnaire, and the Usefulness, Satisfaction, and Ease of use Questionnaire.

Results: A total of 60 patients aged 18-69 years with bipolar disorder (ICD-10) recruited from Italy, Spain, Denmark were included-59 patients completed the study. In Denmark, the patients evaluated the Trilogis-Monsenso system with a statistically significant higher usability compared with the Pulso system. In Italy and Spain, the patients evaluated no statistically significant difference between the two systems in any of the categories, except for the usefulness category favoring the Trilogis-Monsenso system (z = 2.68, p < 0.01).

Conclusions: Both monitoring systems showed acceptable usability and feasibility. There were differences in patient-based evaluations of the two monitoring systems related to the country of the study. Studies investigating the usability and feasibility during longer follow-up periods could perhaps reveal different findings. Future randomized controlled trials investigating the possible positive and negative effects of smartphone-based monitoring systems are needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40345-018-0134-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6320330PMC
January 2019

Health Technology Assessment and Social Network in Mental Health: a pilot study to evaluate use of new technology communication in prevention, monitoring and treatment of mental disorders in Trentino region.

Psychiatr Danub 2014 Nov;26 Suppl 1:142-3

Mental Health Department, Via Garibaldi, 9, Erba (CO), Italy,

The clinical use of Information Communication Technology tools can facilitate the support of population groups at risk and / or with chronic conditions. Social networks and other forms of communication represent an opportunity to improve the quality of care and patient empowerment. The study intends to evaluate, in accordance with the dictates of the HTA, the possibilities related to the use of social networking technologies in the prevention and taking care of mental illness. On the basis of these results and in agreement with the context of the Trentino health system, several application proposals will be developed for the treatment of patients with bipolar disorder. The conclusion of the evaluation, and the related clinical and organizational data to support the implementation process in the Trentino health system is expected in the month of October 2014.
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November 2014

A "no-restraint" psychiatric department: operative protocols and outcome data from the "Opened-doors experience" in Trento.

Psychiatr Danub 2014 Nov;26 Suppl 1:138-41

Mental Health Department, Via Garibaldi, 9, Erba (CO), Italy,

The "Open Doors" and no restraint project in the psychiatric department of Trento originated from de-institutionalization and empowerment practices, amply extended in the Mental Health Service of Trento over the past years. This paper aims to present the authorized operative protocols of no restraint methods and data from the first four years experience of no restraint management in the psychiatric Department of Trento. Avoiding physical restraint and confinement force every member of the ward staff to look for innovative solutions and means a deeper and strenuous engagement of the staff in the therapeutic relationship. We are aware that this is basically a small thing, and that certainly it will create many contradictions. We chose to stay on the other hand in these contradictions, and to witness that it is possible, and indeed useful. The great lesson we learnt over past years in Community Psychiatry was that only the hard experience of these contradictions can allow people to regain health, not just as assimilation to stereotyped models, but as adhibition of resources and self-determination, normally stolen by psychiatric illness.
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November 2014

Your actions in my cerebellum: subclinical deficits in action observation in patients with unilateral chronic cerebellar stroke.

Cerebellum 2012 Mar;11(1):264-71

Center for Mind/Brain Sciences, University of Trento, Via delle Regole 101, 38123 Mattarello, Trento, Italy.

Empirical evidence indicates that cognitive consequences of cerebellar lesions tend to be mild and less important than the symptoms due to lesions to cerebral areas. By contrast, imaging studies consistently report strong cerebellar activity during tasks of action observation and action understanding. This has been interpreted as part of the automatic motor simulation process that takes place in the context of action observation. The function of the cerebellum as a sequencer during executed movements makes it a good candidate, within the framework of embodied cognition, for a pivotal role in understanding the timing of action sequences. Here, we investigated a cohort of eight patients with chronic, first-ever, isolated, ischemic lesions of the cerebellum. The experimental task consisted in identifying a plausible sequence of pictures from a randomly ordered group of still frames extracted from (a) a complex action performed by a human actor ("biological action" test) or (b) a complex physical event occurring to an inanimate object ("folk physics" test). A group of 16 healthy participants was used as control. The main result showed that cerebellar patients performed significantly worse than controls in both sequencing tasks, but performed much worse in the "biological action" test than in the "folk physics" test. The dissociation described here suggests that observed sequences of simple motor acts seem to be represented differentially from other sequences in the cerebellum.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12311-011-0307-9DOI Listing
March 2012
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