Publications by authors named "Oksana Kasyutich"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Hierarchical self-assembly and optical disassembly for controlled switching of magnetoferritin nanoparticle magnetism.

ACS Nano 2011 Aug 15;5(8):6394-402. Epub 2011 Jul 15.

Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Protein cages such as ferritin and viral capsids are interesting building blocks for nanotechnology due to their monodisperse structure and ability to encapsulate various functional moieties. Here we show that recombinant ferritin protein cages encapsulating Fe(3)O(4)-γ-Fe(2)O(3) iron oxide (magnetoferritin) nanoparticles and photodegradable Newkome-type dendrons self-assemble into micrometer-sized complexes with a face-centered-cubic (fcc) superstructure and a lattice constant of 13.1 nm. The magnetic properties of the magnetoferritin particles are affected directly by the hierarchical organization. Magnetoferritin nanoparticles dispersed in water exhibit typical magnetism of single domain noninteracting nanoparticles; however, the same nanoparticles organized into fcc superstructures show clearly the effects of the altered magnetostatic (e.g., dipole-dipole) interactions by exhibiting, for example, different hysteresis of the field-dependent magnetization. The magnetoferritin-dendron assemblies can be efficiently disassembled by a short optical stimulus resulting in release of free magnetoferritin particles. After the triggered release the nanomagnetic properties of the pristine magnetoferritin nanoparticles are regained.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nn201571yDOI Listing
August 2011

Self-assembly and optically triggered disassembly of hierarchical dendron-virus complexes.

Nat Chem 2010 May 21;2(5):394-9. Epub 2010 Mar 21.

Radboud University Nijmegen, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Nature offers a vast array of biological building blocks that can be combined with synthetic materials to generate a variety of hierarchical architectures. Viruses are particularly interesting in this respect because of their structure and the possibility of them functioning as scaffolds for the preparation of new biohybrid materials. We report here that cowpea chlorotic mottle virus particles can be assembled into well-defined micrometre-sized objects and then reconverted into individual viruses by application of a short optical stimulus. Assembly is achieved using photosensitive dendrons that bind on the virus surface through multivalent interactions and then act as a molecular glue between the virus particles. Optical triggering induces the controlled decomposition and charge switching of dendrons, which results in the loss of multivalent interactions and the release of virus particles. We demonstrate that the method is not limited to the virus particles alone, but can also be applied to other functional protein cages such as magnetoferritin.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nchem.592DOI Listing
May 2010

Silver ion incorporation and nanoparticle formation inside the cavity of Pyrococcus furiosus ferritin: structural and size-distribution analyses.

J Am Chem Soc 2010 Mar;132(10):3621-7

University of Bristol, Physics Department, HH Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenues, Bristol, BS8 1TL, UK.

Highly symmetrical protein cage architectures from three different iron storage proteins, heavy and light human ferritin chains (HuHFt and HuLFt) and ferritin from the hyperthemophilic bacterium Pyrococcus furiosus (PfFt), have been used as models for understanding the molecular basis of silver ion deposition and metal core formation inside the protein cavity. Biomineralization using protein cavities is an important issue for the fabrication of biometamaterials under mild synthetic conditions. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were produced with high yields within PfFt but not within HuHFt and HuLFt. To explain the molecular basis of silver incorporation, the X-ray crystal structure of Ag-containing PfFt has been solved. This is the first structure of a silver containing ferritin reported to date, and it revealed the presence of specific binding and nucleation sites of Ag(I) that are not conserved in other ferritin templates. The AgNP encapsulated by PfFt were further characterized by the combined use of different physical-chemical techniques. These showed that the AgNPs are endowed with a narrow size distribution (2.1 +/- 0.4 nm), high stability in water solution at millimolar concentration, and high thermal stability. These properties make the AgNP obtained within PftFt exploitable for a range of applications, in fields as diverse as catalysis in water, preparation of metamaterials, and in vivo diagnosis and antibacterial or tumor therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ja910918bDOI Listing
March 2010

Synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles in Listeria innocua Dps (DNA-binding protein from starved cells): a study with the wild-type protein and a catalytic centre mutant.

Chemistry 2010 Jan;16(2):709-17

C.N.R. Institute of Molecular Biology and Pathology, Department of Biochemical Sciences A. Rossi-Fanelli, Sapienza, University of Rome, 00185 Rome, Italy.

A comparative analysis of the magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles grown in the cavity of the DNA-binding protein from starved cells of the bacterium Listeria innocua, LiDps, and of its triple-mutant lacking the catalytic ferroxidase centre, LiDps-tm, is presented. TEM images and static and dynamic magnetic and electron magnetic resonance (EMR) measurements reveal that, under the applied preparation conditions, namely alkaline pH, high temperature (65 degrees C), exclusion of oxygen, and the presence of hydrogen peroxide, maghemite and/or magnetite nanoparticles with an average diameter of about 3 nm are mineralised inside the cavities of both LiDps and LiDps-tm. The magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) thus formed show similar magnetic properties, with superparamagnetic behaviour above 4.5 K and a large magnetic anisotropy. Interestingly, in the EMR spectra an absorption at half-field is observed, which can be considered as a manifestation of the quantum behaviour of the MNPs. These results indicate that Dps proteins can be advantageously used for the production of nanomagnets at the interface between molecular clusters and traditional MNPs and that the presence of the ferroxidase centre, though increasing the efficiency of nanoparticle formation, does not affect the nature and fine structure of the MNPs. Importantly, the self-organisation of MNP-containing Dps on HRTEM grids suggests that Dps-enclosed MNPs can be deposited on surfaces in an ordered fashion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/chem.200901138DOI Listing
January 2010