Publications by authors named "Oday Hamid"

16 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A Phase 1b Study to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of Durvalumab in Combination With Tremelimumab or Danvatirsen in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma.

Clin Lymphoma Myeloma Leuk 2020 Dec 17. Epub 2020 Dec 17.

Division of Hematology & Oncology, MUSC Health Hollings Cancer Center, Charleston, SC.

Background: Despite recent advances, outcomes in patients with relapsed/refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) remain poor. Immune checkpoint inhibitors have shown limited efficacy in this setting, but combinations with novel agents may enhance benefit. Combination therapy with durvalumab, an anti-programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) antibody, and danvatirsen (AZD9150; an antisense oligonucleotide inhibiting signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 [STAT3]) or tremelimumab (an anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 [CTLA-4] antibody) may augment endogenous antitumor activity.

Patients And Methods: In this phase 1b dose escalation and dose expansion study, we evaluated durvalumab 20 mg/kg every 4 weeks plus either tremelimumab 1 mg/kg every 4 weeks or danvatirsen 2 or 3 mg/kg (administered on days 1, 3, 5, 8, 15, and 22, then every week). Treatment continued until disease progression. The primary endpoint was safety; secondary endpoints included efficacy, pharmacokinetics, and immunogenicity.

Results: As of April 4, 2019, 32 patients were enrolled and treated, receiving a median of 2 prior lines of systemic therapy. Treatment-related adverse events occurred in 21 patients (65.6%), most commonly alanine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase increased (grade 1-3), anemia (grade 1-3), and fatigue (grade 1). The overall objective response rate was 6.3%, with 2 partial responses. Median time to response was 11.0 weeks (range, 7.7-14.3 weeks). Median progression-free survival was 7.4 weeks (range, 0.1-31.4 weeks), and median overall survival was 28.0 weeks (range, 1.9-115.4 weeks).

Conclusion: The primary endpoint was met, with durvalumab plus tremelimumab/danvatirsen generally well tolerated in patients with relapsed/refractory DLBCL; however, antitumor activity was limited.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clml.2020.12.012DOI Listing
December 2020

Safety and clinical activity of intratumoral MEDI9197 alone and in combination with durvalumab and/or palliative radiation therapy in patients with advanced solid tumors.

J Immunother Cancer 2020 10;8(2)

Investigational Cancer Therapeutics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA.

Background: MEDI9197 is an intratumorally administered toll-like receptor 7 and 8 agonist. In mice, MEDI9197 modulated antitumor immune responses, inhibited tumor growth and increased survival. This first-time-in-human, phase 1 study evaluated MEDI9197 with or without the programmed cell death ligand-1 (PD-L1) inhibitor durvalumab and/or palliative radiation therapy (RT) for advanced solid tumors.

Patients And Methods: Eligible patients had at least one cutaneous, subcutaneous, or deep-seated lesion suitable for intratumoral (IT) injection. Dose escalation used a standard 3+3 design. Patients received IT MEDI9197 0.005-0.055 mg with or without RT (part 1), or IT MEDI9197 0.005 or 0.012 mg plus durvalumab 1500 mg intravenous with or without RT (part 3), in 4-week cycles. Primary endpoints were safety and tolerability. Secondary endpoints included pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and objective response based on Response Evaluation Criteria for Solid Tumors version 1.1. Exploratory endpoints included tumor and peripheral biomarkers that correlate with biological activity or predict response.

Results: From November 2015 to March 2018, part 1 enrolled 35 patients and part 3 enrolled 17 patients; five in part 1 and 2 in part 3 received RT. The maximum tolerated dose of MEDI9197 monotherapy was 0.037 mg, with dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of cytokine release syndrome in two patients (one grade 3, one grade 4) and 0.012 mg in combination with durvalumab 1500 mg with DLT of MEDI9197-related hemorrhagic shock in one patient (grade 5) following liver metastasis rupture after two cycles of MEDI9197. Across parts 1 and 3, the most frequent MEDI9197-related adverse events (AEs) of any grade were fever (56%), fatigue (31%), and nausea (21%). The most frequent MEDI9197-related grade ≥3 events were decreased lymphocytes (15%), neutrophils (10%), and white cell counts (10%). MEDI9197 increased tumoral CD8+ and PD-L1+ cells, inducing type 1 and 2 interferons and Th1 response. There were no objective clinical responses; 10 patients in part 1 and 3 patients in part 3 had stable disease ≥8 weeks.

Conclusion: IT MEDI9197 was feasible for subcutaneous/cutaneous lesions but AEs precluded its use in deep-seated lesions. Although no patients responded, MEDI9197 induced systemic and intratumoral immune activation, indicating potential value in combination regimens in other patient populations.

Trial Registration Number: NCT02556463.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jitc-2020-001095DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7549442PMC
October 2020

Ramucirumab plus docetaxel versus placebo plus docetaxel in patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma after platinum-based therapy (RANGE): overall survival and updated results of a randomised, double-blind, phase 3 trial.

Lancet Oncol 2020 01 18;21(1):105-120. Epub 2019 Nov 18.

Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK.

Background: Ramucirumab-an IgG1 vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 antagonist-plus docetaxel was previously reported to improve progression-free survival in platinum-refractory, advanced urothelial carcinoma. Here, we report the secondary endpoint of overall survival results for the RANGE trial.

Methods: We did a randomised, double-blind, phase 3 trial in patients with advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma who progressed during or after platinum-based chemotherapy. Patients were enrolled from 124 investigative sites (hospitals, clinics, and academic centres) in 23 countries. Previous treatment with one immune checkpoint inhibitor was permitted. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1) using an interactive web response system to receive intravenous ramucirumab 10 mg/kg or placebo 10 mg/kg volume equivalent followed by intravenous docetaxel 75 mg/m (60 mg/m in Korea, Taiwan, and Japan) on day 1 of a 21-day cycle. Treatment continued until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity, or other discontinuation criteria were met. Randomisation was stratified by geographical region, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status at baseline, and visceral metastasis. Progression-free survival (the primary endpoint) and overall survival (a key secondary endpoint) were assessed in the intention-to-treat population. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02426125; patient enrolment is complete and the last patient on treatment is being followed up for safety issues.

Findings: Between July 20, 2015, and April 4, 2017, 530 patients were randomly allocated to ramucirumab plus docetaxel (n=263) or placebo plus docetaxel (n=267) and comprised the intention-to-treat population. At database lock (March 21, 2018) for the final overall survival analysis, median follow-up was 7·4 months (IQR 3·5-13·9). In our sensitivity analysis of investigator-assessed progression-free survival at the overall survival database lock, median progression-free survival remained significantly improved with ramucirumab compared with placebo (4·1 months [95% CI 3·3-4·8] vs 2·8 months [2·6-2·9]; HR 0·696 [95% CI 0·573-0·845]; p=0·0002). Median overall survival was 9·4 months (95% CI 7·9-11·4) in the ramucirumab group versus 7·9 months (7·0-9·3) in the placebo group (stratified HR 0·887 [95% CI 0·724-1·086]; p=0·25). Grade 3 or worse treatment-related treatment-emergent adverse events in 5% or more of patients and with an incidence more than 2% higher with ramucirumab than with placebo were febrile neutropenia (24 [9%] of 258 patients in the ramucirumab group vs 16 [6%] of 265 patients in the placebo group) and neutropenia (17 [7%] of 258 vs six [2%] of 265). Serious adverse events were similar between groups (112 [43%] of 258 patients in the ramucirumab group vs 107 [40%] of 265 patients in the placebo group). Adverse events related to study treatment and leading to death occurred in eight (3%) patients in the ramucirumab group versus five (2%) patients in the placebo group.

Interpretation: Additional follow-up supports that ramucirumab plus docetaxel significantly improves progression-free survival, without a significant improvement in overall survival, for patients with platinum-refractory advanced urothelial carcinoma. Clinically meaningful benefit might be restricted in an unselected population.

Funding: Eli Lilly and Company.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1470-2045(19)30668-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6946880PMC
January 2020

Ramucirumab plus docetaxel versus placebo plus docetaxel in patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma after platinum-based therapy (RANGE): a randomised, double-blind, phase 3 trial.

Lancet 2017 Nov 12;390(10109):2266-2277. Epub 2017 Sep 12.

Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK.

Background: Few treatments with a distinct mechanism of action are available for patients with platinum-refractory advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma. We assessed the efficacy and safety of treatment with docetaxel plus either ramucirumab-a human IgG1 VEGFR-2 antagonist-or placebo in this patient population.

Methods: We did a randomised, double-blind, phase 3 trial in patients with advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma who progressed during or after platinum-based chemotherapy. Patients were enrolled from 124 sites in 23 countries. Previous treatment with one immune-checkpoint inhibitor was permitted. Patients were randomised (1:1) using an interactive web response system to receive intravenous docetaxel 75 mg/m plus either intravenous ramucirumab 10 mg/kg or matching placebo on day 1 of repeating 21-day cycles, until disease progression or other discontinuation criteria were met. The primary endpoint was investigator-assessed progression-free survival, analysed by intention-to-treat in the first 437 randomised patients. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02426125.

Findings: Between July, 2015, and April, 2017, 530 patients were randomly allocated either ramucirumab plus docetaxel (n=263) or placebo plus docetaxel (n=267). Progression-free survival was prolonged significantly in patients allocated ramucirumab plus docetaxel versus placebo plus docetaxel (median 4·07 months [95% CI 2·96-4·47] vs 2·76 months [2·60-2·96]; hazard ratio [HR] 0·757, 95% CI 0·607-0·943; p=0·0118). A blinded independent central analysis was consistent with these results. An objective response was achieved by 53 (24·5%, 95% CI 18·8-30·3) of 216 patients allocated ramucirumab and 31 (14·0%, 9·4-18·6) of 221 assigned placebo. The most frequently reported treatment-emergent adverse events, regardless of causality, in either treatment group (any grade) were fatigue, alopecia, diarrhoea, decreased appetite, and nausea. These events occurred predominantly at grade 1-2 severity. The frequency of grade 3 or worse adverse events was similar for patients allocated ramucirumab and placebo (156 [60%] of 258 vs 163 [62%] of 265 had an adverse event), with no unexpected toxic effects. 63 (24%) of 258 patients allocated ramucirumab and 54 (20%) of 265 assigned placebo had a serious adverse event that was judged by the investigator to be related to treatment. 38 (15%) of 258 patients allocated ramucirumab and 43 (16%) of 265 assigned placebo died on treatment or within 30 days of discontinuation, of which eight (3%) and five (2%) deaths were deemed related to treatment by the investigator. Sepsis was the most common adverse event leading to death on treatment (four [2%] vs none [0%]). One fatal event of neutropenic sepsis was reported in a patient allocated ramucirumab.

Interpretation: To the best of our knowledge, ramucirumab plus docetaxel is the first regimen in a phase 3 study to show superior progression-free survival over chemotherapy in patients with platinum-refractory advanced urothelial carcinoma. These data validate inhibition of VEGFR-2 signalling as a potential new therapeutic treatment option for patients with urothelial carcinoma.

Funding: Eli Lilly and Company.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(17)32365-6DOI Listing
November 2017

A Phase 1 Study of LY2874455, an Oral Selective pan-FGFR Inhibitor, in Patients with Advanced Cancer.

Target Oncol 2017 08;12(4):463-474

Division of Cancer Medicine, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, 305 Grattan St, Melbourne, VIC, 3000, Australia.

Background: We report here a phase 1 study of LY2874455, a potent oral selective pan-fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) inhibitor.

Objective: The primary objective was to determine the recommended phase 2 dosing (RP2D). Secondary objectives included determining toxicity, antitumor activity, pharmacokinetics (PK), and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties of LY2874455.

Patients And Methods: This study comprised two parts: (a) dose escalation with 3 + 3 cohorts in patients with solid tumors and (b) dose-expansion cohorts in patients with gastric cancer (GC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Part A: 36 patients in 11 dose cohorts ranging from 2 to 24 mg twice daily (BID). RP2D was 16 mg BID. Part B: GC cohort, 29 patients, NSCLC cohort, 27 patients, all treated at the RP2D.

Results: LY2874455 was slowly absorbed and generally showed linear PK. The effective half-life was ∼12 h. PD properties of LY2874455 occurred at doses ≥10 mg by increases in serum phosphorus. Phosphate binders were administered to control serum phosphorus. LY2874455 was generally well tolerated; most toxicities were grade 1 or 2; most frequent were hyperphosphatemia, diarrhea, and stomatitis.

Efficacy: part A: 24 patients evaluable: 1 patient in the 14-mg BID cohort with GC had a partial response (PR); 14 patients had stable disease (SD); part B: NSCLC cohort: 11 of 12 evaluable patients had SD; GC cohort: 15 patients evaluable: 1 patient with PR; 12 patients with SD.

Conclusions: LY2874455 has an RP2D of 16 mg BID and demonstrated good tolerability and activity in solid-organ cancer patients. The role of FGFR inhibition on tumor growth in patients requires further study. (NCT01212107).
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11523-017-0502-9DOI Listing
August 2017

A randomized phase II study of LY2510924 and carboplatin/etoposide versus carboplatin/etoposide in extensive-disease small cell lung cancer.

Lung Cancer 2017 03 31;105:7-13. Epub 2016 Dec 31.

Lung Cancer Research Program, Sarah Cannon Research Institute, LLC, Nashville, TN, United States.

Objectives: This multicenter, open-label, randomized phase II study evaluated the efficacy and safety of LY2510924 (LY) added to first-line standard of care (SOC) chemotherapy for extensive-disease small cell lung cancer (ED-SCLC) and explored the predictive value of C-X-C motif receptor 4 (CXCR4) tumor response.

Materials And Methods: Patients with treatment-naïve ED-SCLC were randomized (1:1) to receive up to six 21-day cycles of carboplatin/etoposide alone (SOC) or in combination with 20mg LY2510924 administered subcutaneously on days 1-7 of each cycle (LY+SOC). The primary efficacy endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS), overall response rate (ORR), and safety. Response relative to CXCR4 expression on baseline tumor was an exploratory endpoint.

Results: Of 94 patients randomized, 90 received treatment (LY+SOC, n=47; SOC, n=43). Median PFS (95% confidence interval [CI]) was 5.88 (4.83, 6.24) months for LY+SOC versus 5.85 (4.63, 5.51) months for SOC (hazard ratio [95% CI], 1.01 [0.62, 1.63]; p=0.9806). Median OS (95% CI) was 9.72 (6.64, 11.70) months for LY+SOC versus 11.14 (8.25, 13.44) months for SOC. ORR was 74.5% for LY+SOC versus 81% for SOC. Safety results between arms were similar, although the following adverse events were more frequent on the LY+SOC arm: anemia (61.7% vs 46.5%), neutropenia (61.7% vs 53.5%), leukopenia (27.7% vs 9.3%), vomiting (27.7% vs 16.3%), and pneumonia (10.6% vs 2.3%). In patients whose baseline CXCR4 expression was above the optimal cutoff (H-score 210), the hazard ratio (95% CI) was 1.27 (0.51, 3.15).

Conclusion: LY2510924 did not improve efficacy but had an acceptable toxicity profile when added to SOC for ED-SCLC.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lungcan.2016.12.020DOI Listing
March 2017

A Randomized, Open-Label Phase 2 Study of the CXCR4 Inhibitor LY2510924 in Combination with Sunitinib Versus Sunitinib Alone in Patients with Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC).

Target Oncol 2016 10;11(5):643-653

Tennessee Oncology, Chattanooga, TN, USA.

Purpose: The chemokine (C-X-C Motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) and its ligand, stromal-cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1), are frequently overexpressed in a variety of solid tumors, and are believed to play important roles in the regulation of organ-specific metastasis, tumor growth, invasion, and survival. In this randomized Phase 2 trial, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of LY2510924 (LY), a peptide antagonist of CXCR4, combined with sunitinib (SUN) in the first-line treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC).

Patients And Methods: Eligible patients were randomized (2:1) to receive LY (20 mg SC daily) + SUN (50 mg PO daily for 4 weeks followed by 2 weeks off) or SUN alone. Response was assessed after two cycles; patients continued treatment until tumor progression or intolerable toxicity. The study was powered to detect a 47 % increase in median progression-free survival (PFS).

Results: One hundred eight patients were randomized and treated (LY + SUN, 72; SUN, 36); median duration of treatment of five cycles. Observed median PFS was 8.1 months with LY + SUN and 12.3 months with SUN; Bayesian time-to-event HR 1.23; 95 % credible interval: 0.74, 1.96. LY was well tolerated; the toxicity profile was typical of SUN. No efficacy differences were seen between treatments groups when subsets with high versus low levels of CXCR4 tumor expression were compared.

Conclusions: The addition of LY to SUN in the first-line treatment of metastatic RCC was well tolerated, but did not improve the PFS or overall survival (OS) vs. SUN alone. CXCR4 remains an unproven therapeutic target for the treatment of RCC.

Clinical Trial:

Gov Identifier: NCT01391130.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11523-016-0434-9DOI Listing
October 2016

Open-label, single-arm, phase II study of enzastaurin in patients with follicular lymphoma.

Br J Haematol 2014 Jul 27;166(1):91-7. Epub 2014 Mar 27.

West Clinic, Memphis, TN, USA.

This open-label, phase II study investigated whether enzastaurin, a protein kinase C-beta (PKCβ) inhibitor, had activity in patients with grade 1 or 2 follicular lymphoma (FL). Adults with grade 1 or 2 FL who had no more than one prior treatment received oral enzastaurin continuously for up to 3 years. Of the 66 patients who received enzastaurin, 53 were evaluable for response. Overall response rate (ORR, primary efficacy endpoint) was 26.4% (3.8% complete response). Median (95% confidence interval) progression-free survival, time to response, and duration of response were 18.1 (11.5-28.3), 4.9 (2.8-8.1), and 22.3 (8.8-not applicable) months, respectively. In patients with tumour tissue available for biomarker analysis, ORRs in low versus high PKCβ2 expression groups were 41.7% and 8.3%, respectively (P = 0.041). The most common, mainly low-grade drug-related adverse events were fatigue (25.8%), diarrhoea (25.8%), nausea (18.2%), and chromaturia (18.2%). Four (6.1%) patients had Grade 3 toxicity and one (1.5%) patient had Grade 4 toxicity. Enzastaurin demonstrated limited clinical activity in grade 1 or 2 FL. Patients with low PKCβ2 expression in tumours had higher ORR than those with high PKCβ2 expression. Enzastaurin was well tolerated with mostly grade 1 or 2 toxicities. Further studies may be warranted in select patient populations.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjh.12853DOI Listing
July 2014

A multicenter, open-label, noncomparative screening study of enzastaurin in adult patients with non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

Clin Lymphoma Myeloma Leuk 2013 Aug 14;13(4):398-403. Epub 2013 Jun 14.

Department of Haematology Wyong Hospital, Kanwal, Australia.

Purpose: To assess the antitumor activity of enzastaurin in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphomas: T-cell lymphoma (n = 23): cutaneous and peripheral T-cell lymphoma; indolent B-cell lymphomas (n = 19): small lymphocytic, follicular grade 1 or 2, marginal zone lymphomas; and aggressive B-cell lymphomas (n = 15): follicular lymphomas grade 3, aggressive lymphoma with a clinical history. The primary objective was to determine overall tumor response. Secondary objectives included duration of response and safety.

Materials And Methods: In this multicenter, open-label, noncomparative, screening study conducted between December 2007 and February 2009, patients (≥ 18 years) who relapsed after ≥ 1 prior systemic treatment or who were intolerant to standard systemic therapy received 250 mg oral enzastaurin (125 mg tablets twice a day; a 1125-mg loading dose on day 1), in 28-day cycles for up to 2 years unless unacceptable toxicity or progressive disease occurred.

Results: Responses were seen in follicular lymphomas grade 3 (1/5, 20.0%), cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (2/11, 18.2%), small lymphocytic lymphomas (1/7, 14.3%), and aggressive lymphoma with a clinical history (1/10, 10.0%) in this heavily pretreated patient population (median prior therapies range from 4 to 10). Most drug-related toxicities were grade 1/2, the most common being diarrhea, peripheral edema, and pruritus.

Conclusions: Enzastaurin was well tolerated but demonstrated modest responses across subgroups in this heavily pretreated patient population.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clml.2013.03.005DOI Listing
August 2013

Dose escalation and pharmacokinetics study of enzastaurin and sunitinib versus placebo and sunitinib in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

Am J Clin Oncol 2012 Oct;35(5):493-7

Department of Medicine I and Cancer Center, Clinical Division of Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

Objective: To assess antiangiogenic effects of enzastaurin in combination with sunitinib in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC).

Methods: This was a multicenter, phase 2 study of enzastaurin and sunitinib versus placebo and sunitinib for adult patients with metastatic clear cell RCC. Part 1 was a 6-week, open-label, safety lead-in phase with 2 cohorts (sunitinib, both cohorts: 50 mg/d for 4 weeks; enzastaurin, cohort 1: a loading dose of 500 mg, followed by 250 mg daily; cohort 2: a loading dose of 1125 mg, followed by 500 mg daily). Part 2 was to be a randomized, double-blinded phase, with efficacy as the primary objective. Secondary objectives included the assessment of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) and pharmacokinetics.

Results: Seventeen patients received ≥1 dose of study medication. Six patients (54.5%) in cohort 1 and 2 patients (33.3%) in cohort 2 received ≥6 cycles of treatment. All patients experienced ≥1 TEAE possibly related to study drug. Dose reductions were required as follows: cohort 1--enzastaurin, n=4 (36.4%), sunitinib, n=6 (54.5%); cohort 2--enzastaurin, n=3 (50.0%), sunitinib, n=2 (33.3%).

Conclusions: Whereas the hypothesis that combining sunitinib and enzastaurin may result in greater antiangiogenic effects in RCC is based on solid scientific evidence, part 2 of the study was not activated due to the high number of TEAE-related dose reductions at the expected efficacious dose and overall decision by the sponsor not to pursue further development of enzastaurin for solid tumors.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/COC.0b013e31821cfc41DOI Listing
October 2012

Multicenter phase II trial of enzastaurin in patients with relapsed or refractory advanced cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

Leuk Lymphoma 2011 Aug 8;52(8):1474-80. Epub 2011 Jun 8.

Department of Dermatology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611, USA.

This multicenter, single-arm, open-label non-randomized phase II trial (NCT00744991) was conducted in patients with recurrent/refractory mycosis fungoides (MF), stage IB-IVB, or Sézary syndrome (SS). A Simon two-stage design required 25 patients enrolled in stage 1 with ≥7 confirmed objective responses for expansion into stage 2. Patients were treated with oral enzastaurin (250 mg twice daily) until disease progression or intolerable toxicity. The primary endpoint was investigator-assessed response rate; secondary endpoints were time to objective response, response duration, time-to-progression, patient-reported pruritus, and safety/tolerability. Twenty-five patients were enrolled. A partial response was observed in one patient with MF. Median time-to-progression was 78 and 44 days in MF and SS, respectively. Self-reported pruritus relief and improved composite pruritus-specific symptom scores were documented in six and four patients, respectively. Enzastaurin was well tolerated with mostly grade 1-2 adverse events, mainly diarrhea and fatigue. There were two adverse event-related drug discontinuations with one possibly treatment-related.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/10428194.2011.572265DOI Listing
August 2011

Multicenter, randomized phase II trial of oral CI-1033 for previously treated advanced ovarian cancer.

J Clin Oncol 2005 Aug;23(24):5597-604

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 44 Binney St, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Purpose: To evaluate the antitumor activity and toxicity of two doses of CI-1033 in patients with platinum-refractory or recurrent ovarian cancer, and to determine baseline expression of epidermal growth factor receptor in tumor cells.

Patients And Methods: This phase II, open-label clinical trial evaluated CI-1033 in patients with ovarian cancer who failed prior platinum-based therapy. Two oral doses of CI-1033 were evaluated--a 50-mg and a 200--mg oral dose administered daily for 21 days in a 28-day cycle. Patients were evaluated for tumor response and toxicity; in addition, archival baseline tumor samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for erbB1 to erbB4 status.

Results: One hundred five eligible patients were treated. Baseline demographic characteristics were balanced in this heavily pretreated patient population. The median number of prior chemotherapy regimens received was four. The most commonly encountered drug-related adverse events for both dose arms were gastrointestinal (diarrhea, nausea, stomatitis) toxicity, asthenia, and rash. No responses were observed. Stable disease was confirmed in 34% and 26% of patients in the 200-mg and 50-mg arms, respectively, and 1-year survival rates were 38.5% and 37.7%, respectively. Baseline erbB3 and erbB4 revealed the highest frequencies of expression, while erbB2 was the lowest.

Conclusion: CI-1033 did not show activity in unscreened patients with advanced ovarian cancer. At 50 mg/d, CI-1033 had a more favorable adverse events profile than at 200 mg/d. erbB3 and erbB4 receptors showed the highest expression in tumor samples while erbB2 revealed the least. There appears to be no association between baseline erbB expression and disease stability.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2005.08.091DOI Listing
August 2005

Multicenter phase II study of the oral MEK inhibitor, CI-1040, in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung, breast, colon, and pancreatic cancer.

J Clin Oncol 2004 Nov 13;22(22):4456-62. Epub 2004 Oct 13.

University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA.

Purpose: This multicenter, open-label, phase II study was undertaken to assess the antitumor activity and safety of the oral mitogen-activated extracellular signal regulated kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor, CI-1040, in breast cancer, colon cancer, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and pancreatic cancer.

Patients And Methods: Patients with advanced colorectal, NSCLC, breast, or pancreatic cancer received oral CI-1040 continuously at 800 mg bid. All patients had measurable disease at baseline, a performance status of 2 or less, and adequate bone marrow, liver, and renal function. Expression of pERK, pAkt, and Ki-67 was assessed in archived tumor specimens by quantitative immunohistochemistry.

Results: Sixty-seven patients with breast (n = 14), colon (n = 20), NSCLC (n = 18), and pancreatic (n = 15) cancer received a total of 194 courses of treatment (median, 2.0 courses; range, one to 14 courses). No complete or partial responses were observed. Stable disease (SD) lasting a median of 4.4 months (range, 4 to 18 months) was confirmed in eight patients (one breast, two colon, two pancreas, and three NSCLC patients). Treatment was well tolerated, with 81% of patients experiencing toxicities of grade 2 or less severity. Most common toxicities included diarrhea, nausea, asthenia, and rash. A mild association (P < .055) between baseline pERK expression in archived tumor specimens and SD was observed.

Conclusion: CI-1040 was generally well tolerated but demonstrated insufficient antitumor activity to warrant further development in the four tumors tested. PD 0325901, a second generation MEK inhibitor, has recently entered clinical development and, with significantly improved pharmacologic and pharmaceutical properties compared with CI-1040, it may better test the therapeutic potential of MEK inhibition in cancer.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2004.01.185DOI Listing
November 2004

Emerging treatments in oncology: focus on tyrosine kinase (erbB) receptor inhibitors.

Authors:
Oday Hamid

J Am Pharm Assoc (2003) 2004 Jan-Feb;44(1):52-8

Pfizer Global Research and Development, Ann Arbor Laboratory, Ann Arbor, Mich 48105, USA.

Objective: To describe the role of tyrosine kinase (TK) and its subreceptors in the development of cancer and the role of TK inhibitors in cancer treatment.

Data Sources: Published articles identified through MEDLINE using search terms such as tyrosine kinase, erbB1, erbB2, erbB3, erbB4, epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR), and EGFR inhibitors. Additional sources were identified from bibliographies in the articles and from Web sites and reports from the National Cancer Institute, American Society of Clinical Oncology, and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer.

Data Synthesis: Progress in identifying the biochemical and molecular causes of cancer has led to discovery of abnormalities that characterize cancer cells and represent targets for development of drug therapies. TK receptors represent one such target when these are present in elevated quantities and/or aberrant forms. Abnormalities in these cell surface receptors have been correlated with development and progression of cancer, poor response to chemotherapeutic agents, and low survival rates. Several subtypes of TK receptors have been identified, and mutations in these have been associated with neoplasms of the breast, lung, colon, ovaries, and other organs. Approved agents, such as trastuzumab (Herceptin-Genentech) work by blocking a subtype of TK receptors that has been associated with breast cancer growth. Gefitinib (Iressa-AstraZeneca) was recently approved for treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer in patients who have failed treatment with traditional chemotherapeutic agents. Other agents such as cetuximab, erlotinib, and canertinib are in advanced stages of clinical trials and may be available for general clinical use in the next few years.

Conclusion: Cancer continues to be a difficult disease to treat, but newly identified cellular targets have resulted in new medications, and these promising agents are giving hope for additional options for patients with various solid tumors.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1331/154434504322713237DOI Listing
March 2004

Phase II trial of intravenous CI-1042 in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

J Clin Oncol 2003 Apr;21(8):1498-504

Pfizer Global Research and Development, 2800 Plymouth Rd, Ann Arbor, MI 48105, USA.

Purpose: To evaluate the antitumor activity, safety, immune response, and replication of CI-1042 (ONYX-015), an E1B 55-kd gene-deleted replication-selective adenovirus, administered intravenously to patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

Patients And Methods: Eighteen patients with metastatic colorectal cancer for whom prior chemotherapy failed were enrolled onto an open-label, multicenter, phase II study. CI-1042 was administered intravenously at a dose of 2 x 1012 viral particles every 2 weeks. Patients were evaluated for tumor response and toxicity; in addition, blood samples were taken for adenovirus DNA and neutralizing antibody analysis.

Results: Common toxicities included flu-like symptoms, nausea, and emesis. All 18 patients eventually were removed from study because of progressive disease. Seven patients were assessed as having stable disease after 2 months of treatment, whereas two patients were considered to have stable disease after 4 months. Detectable circulating CI-1042 DNA was identified in 36% of patients 72 hours after last infusion, which is suggestive of ongoing viral replication.

Conclusion: In this phase II study, intravenous CI-1042 was administered safely to patients with advanced colorectal cancer. Toxicity was manageable, consisting primarily of flu-like symptoms. Stable disease was experienced by seven patients for 11 to 18 weeks.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2003.09.114DOI Listing
April 2003