Publications by authors named "Oana Piscoran"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The use of health information technology in renal transplantation: A systematic review.

Transplant Rev (Orlando) 2021 04 10;35(2):100607. Epub 2021 Feb 10.

Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Renal and Pancreatic Transplantation, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, Greater Manchester, M13 9WL, UK; University of Manchester Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Gastroenterology, Manchester, Greater Manchester, M13 9PT, UK.

Renal transplantation is a complex, multi-disciplinary and cross-center service. Clinical pathways naturally traverse specialty and organizational boundaries as patients transition from chronic kidney disease to renal failure and ultimately transplantation. Health information technology (IT) has the potential to support transplant care by improving access to data, information sharing and communication. This novel review aimed to identify and characterize health IT solutions in renal transplantation, and where possible evaluate any intended benefits. A systematic literature review was conducted of studies covering any part of the clinical pathway, with end-users being clinical staff or patients. Interventions were characterized and evaluated for achieved benefits using the World Health Organization (WHO) Classification of Digital Health Interventions and the mixed methods assessment tool (MMAT) was used to determine the quality of experimental studies. Of 4498 articles, 12 descriptive and 6 experimental studies met the inclusion criteria. Median MMAT percentage score of experimental studies was 64 (i.q.r. 57 to 74.8). The most frequent functionality of technology involved overcoming communication roadblocks and improving access to data. Intended benefits included improving information management and supporting workflow, however only one study reported evaluated results. Six patient-facing applications that primarily addressed adherence-to-treatment were identified, five of which were evaluated for intended benefits, showing overall positive results. Overall, despite transplantation being well suited to health IT interventions, this review demonstrates a scarcity of literature in this field. A small number of clinician- and patient-facing IT solutions have been reported, albeit mostly in non-experimental studies. Due to this lack of formal evaluation, the effectiveness of solutions remains unclear. High-quality evaluative studies are required to develop effective IT solutions that improve clinical care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.trre.2021.100607DOI Listing
April 2021

Kidney Transplantation From a 5-Day-Old Donor With a Single Functioning Kidney.

Exp Clin Transplant 2020 11;18(6):732-736

From the Department of Renal and Pancreas Transplantation, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust, Unitek Kingdom.

Kidney transplant restores renal function in eligible patients with end-stage renal failure who require renal replacement therapy. There remains a significant disparity between the demand and supply of suitable kidneys for transplant. In recent years, pediatric donors have formed an important area for expansion of the donor pool. However, neonatal donation (< 28 days) remains an underutilized resource. We describe a case of en bloc kidney transplant from a 5-day-old donor after circulatory death into an adult recipient. One kidney thrombosed almost immediately, leaving a single 4.5-cm, poorly functioning kidney. Eighteen months after transplant, the recipient has shown good function with the estimated glomerular filtration rate continuing to improve. This case demonstrates that a single neonatal kidney can grow and adapt to provide adequate renal function in an adult. This experience suggests that a single kidney from a neonate can sustain renal function in adults, and every effort should be made to maximize their use in transplant.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6002/ect.2020.0254DOI Listing
November 2020

Living donor kidney transplantation: Let's talk about it.

Clin Med (Lond) 2020 05;20(3):346-348

Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK and University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.

Transplantation is the preferred treatment option for end-stage renal disease as it offers superior results and patient reported outcomes in comparison to dialysis. Patients treated with a transplant live longer, healthier and more independent lives. Transplantation is also more cost-effective, reducing the overall burden of renal disease. Despite the rising incidence of renal failure, the uptake of living donor kidney transplantation has been static across the UK for several years. Among transplantation, living donation offers a number of advantages compared with deceased donor transplantation. The procedure is more likely to be performed pre-dialysis and the elective nature allows for better perioperative planning. Awareness for living donation processes among healthcare professionals, patients and the public appears to be poor. Sharing information regarding the process will help educate colleagues, dispel myths and, crucially, allow patients the opportunity to talk about this treatment option with their hospital doctor.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7861/clinmed.2020-0047DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7354017PMC
May 2020
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