Publications by authors named "O Manintveld"

122 Publications

Prevalence of Iron Deficiency and Iron Administration in Left Ventricular Assist Device and Heart Transplantation Patients.

ASAIO J 2021 Oct 12. Epub 2021 Oct 12.

From the Erasmus MC, University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Iron deficiency (ID) is a common comorbidity in heart failure (HF). In these patients, intravenous iron administration can improve clinical outcomes and quality of life (QoL). However, data on ID are lacking in patients who have transitioned toward left ventricular assist device (LVAD) or heart transplantation (HTx). All patients who underwent LVAD (n = 84) surgery or HTx (n = 67) at our center between 2012 and 2019, aged ≥18 years with a follow-up of ≥3 months, were included. Retrospectively, the prevalence of ID up to 1 year preoperatively, and up to February 2020 postoperatively, as well as all iron administrations were assessed during this period. Iron status was assessed in 61% and 51% of the LVAD and HTx patients preoperatively, and 81% and 84%, respectively, postoperatively. Of these patients, 53% and 71% of the LVAD and HTx patients preoperatively were diagnosed with ID preoperatively, and 71% and 77%, respectively, postoperatively. ID was more frequently diagnosed >3 months postoperatively. Sixty-three percent of the LVAD (mostly intravenous) and 63% of the HTx patients (mostly oral) received iron administration. ID is highly prevalent pre- and post-LVAD and HTx. It is plausible that substitution can have similar QoL gains as in regular HF patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MAT.0000000000001585DOI Listing
October 2021

Endovascular renal sympathetic denervation to improve heart failure with reduced ejection fraction: the IMPROVE-HF-I study.

Neth Heart J 2021 Oct 5. Epub 2021 Oct 5.

University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Introduction: The aim of the present study was to assess the safety and efficacy of renal sympathetic denervation (RDN) in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF).

Methods: We randomly assigned 50 patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤ 35% and NYHA class ≥ II, in a 1:1 ratio, to either RDN and optimal medical therapy (OMT) or OMT alone. The primary safety endpoint was the occurrence of a combined endpoint of cardiovascular death, rehospitalisation for heart failure, and acute kidney injury at 6 months. The primary efficacy endpoint was the change in iodine-123 meta-iodobenzylguanidine (I‑MIBG) heart-to-mediastinum ratio (HMR) at 6 months.

Results: Mean age was 60 ± 9 years, 86% was male and mean LVEF was 33 ± 8%. At 6 months, the primary safety endpoint occurred in 8.3% vs 8.0% in the RDN and OMT groups, respectively (p = 0.97). At 6 months, the mean change in late HMR was -0.02 (95% CI: -0.08 to 0.12) in the RDN group, versus -0.02 (95% CI: -0.09 to 0.12) in the OMT group (p = 0.95) whereas the mean change in washout rate was 2.34 (95% CI: -6.35 to 1.67) in the RDN group versus -2.59 (95% CI: -1.61 to 6.79) in the OMT group (p-value 0.09).

Conclusion: RDN with the Vessix system in patients with HFrEF was safe, but did not result in significant changes in cardiac sympathetic nerve activity at 6 months as measured using I‑MIBG.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12471-021-01633-zDOI Listing
October 2021

The smell of lung disease: a review of the current status of electronic nose technology.

Respir Res 2021 Sep 17;22(1):246. Epub 2021 Sep 17.

Department of Respiratory Medicine, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

There is a need for timely, accurate diagnosis, and personalised management in lung diseases. Exhaled breath reflects inflammatory and metabolic processes in the human body, especially in the lungs. The analysis of exhaled breath using electronic nose (eNose) technology has gained increasing attention in the past years. This technique has great potential to be used in clinical practice as a real-time non-invasive diagnostic tool, and for monitoring disease course and therapeutic effects. To date, multiple eNoses have been developed and evaluated in clinical studies across a wide spectrum of lung diseases, mainly for diagnostic purposes. Heterogeneity in study design, analysis techniques, and differences between eNose devices currently hamper generalization and comparison of study results. Moreover, many pilot studies have been performed, while validation and implementation studies are scarce. These studies are needed before implementation in clinical practice can be realised. This review summarises the technical aspects of available eNose devices and the available evidence for clinical application of eNose technology in different lung diseases. Furthermore, recommendations for future research to pave the way for clinical implementation of eNose technology are provided.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12931-021-01835-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8448171PMC
September 2021

Listing criteria for heart transplantation in the Netherlands.

Neth Heart J 2021 Sep 15. Epub 2021 Sep 15.

Department of Cardiology, Erasmus Medical Centre Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

The updated listing criteria for heart transplantation are presented on behalf of the three heart transplant centres in the Netherlands. Given the shortage of donor hearts, selection of those patients who may expect to have the greatest benefit from a scarce societal resource in terms of life expectancy and quality of life is inevitable. The indication for heart transplantation includes end-stage heart disease not remediable by more conservative measures, accompanied by severe physical limitation while on optimal medical therapy, including ICD/CRT‑D. Assessment of this condition requires cardiopulmonary stress testing, prognostic stratification and invasive haemodynamic measurements. Timely referral to a tertiary centre is essential for an optimal outcome. Chronic mechanical circulatory support is being used more and more as an alternative to heart transplantation and to bridge the progressively longer waiting time for heart transplantation and, thus, has become an important treatment option for patients with advanced heart failure.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12471-021-01627-xDOI Listing
September 2021

CT-derived fractional flow reserve (FFRct) for functional coronary artery evaluation in the follow-up of patients after heart transplantation.

Eur Radiol 2021 Sep 15. Epub 2021 Sep 15.

Department of Cardiology, Thorax Center, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Doctor Molewaterplein 40, 3015 GD, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Objectives: Invasively measured fractional flow reserve (FFR) is associated with outcome in heart transplant (HTx) patients. Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA)-derived FFR (FFRct) provides additional functional information from anatomical CT images. We describe the first use of FFRct in HTx patients.

Methods: HTx patients underwent CCTA with FFRct to screen for cardiac allograft vasculopathy. FFRct was measured distal to each coronary stenosis > 30% and FFRct ≤ 0.8 indicated hemodynamically significant stenosis. FFRct was also measured at the most distal location of each vessel. Overall distal FFRct was calculated as the mean of the distal values in the left, right, and circumflex coronary artery in each patient.

Results: Seventy-three patients (age 56 (42-65) years, 63% males) at 11 (8-16) years after HTx were included. Eighteen (25%) patients had a focal hemodynamically significant stenosis (stenosis > 30% with FFRct ≤ 0.8). In the 55 patients without a hemodynamically significant focal FFRct stenosis (FFRct > 0.80), the distal left anterior descending artery FFRct was < 0.90 in 74% of the patients and 10 (18%) patients had ≥ 1 coronary artery with a distal FFRct ≤ 0.8, including 1 with a distal FFRct ≤ 0.8 in all coronaries. Overall distal FFRct in patients without focal stenosis was 0.88 (0.86-0.91), 0.87 (0.86-0.90), and 0.88 (0.86-0.91) (median with 25th-75th percentile) at 5-9, 10-14, or ≥ 15 years post-transplantation, respectively (p = 0.93).

Conclusions: FFRct performed on CCTA scans of HTx patients demonstrated that 25% of patients had a focal coronary stenosis with FFRct ≤ 0.8. Even without a focal stenosis, FFRct values are often abnormal in HTx patients.

Key Points: • This is the first report describing the use of FFRct in in heart transplant patients. • FFRct identifies patients after heart transplantation with hemodynamically significant coronary stenosis. • Even without a focal stenosis, FFRct values are often abnormal in heart transplant patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00330-021-08246-5DOI Listing
September 2021
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