Publications by authors named "Nursen İlçin"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effects of an Integrated Exercise Program Including "Functional" Inspiratory Muscle Training in Geriatric Individuals with and without Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

Ann Geriatr Med Res 2021 Mar 30;25(1):45-54. Epub 2021 Mar 30.

School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir, Turkey.

Background: Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) is a commonly used exercise method for both patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and the older adult population. In addition to their primary function, respiratory muscles play an active role in core stabilization. However, no IMT program includes both of these functions (i.e., core stabilization and postural control functions as well as respiration). This study investigated the effects of a newly integrated exercise program, termed "functional IMT," in geriatric individuals with and without COPD.

Methods: This prospective and experimental study included 45 geriatric individuals with COPD (n=22) and without COPD (n=23). The training program consisted of 4 weeks of conventional IMT followed by 4 weeks of functional IMT. Respiratory muscle strength, symptoms, exercise capacity, balance, postural control, physical activity, and quality of life were evaluated.

Results: After training, respiratory muscle strength, symptoms, exercise capacity, balance, postural control, and quality of life improved in both groups (p<0.05). In addition, physical activity was increased in the COPD group (p<0.05). We observed no statistically significant difference in outcomes between the two groups before and after treatment (p>0.05).

Conclusion: The gains were similar in both groups. Functional IMT, which is an integrated approach that includes all respiratory muscle functions, is a safe, effective, and innovative method for use in geriatric individuals with and without COPD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4235/agmr.21.0014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8024171PMC
March 2021

The Effects Of Myofascial Release Technique Combined With Core Stabilization Exercise In Elderly With Non-Specific Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled, Single-Blind Study.

Clin Interv Aging 2019 9;14:1729-1740. Epub 2019 Oct 9.

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Kırsehir Ahi Evran University Training and Research Hospital, Kırşehir, Turkey.

Purpose: To evaluate the effects of Myofascial Release Technique (MRT) with a roller massager combined with core stabilization exercises (CSE) in elderly with non-specific low back pain (NSLBP).

Patients And Methods: A total of forty-five participants were randomly divided into two groups (CSE and CSE+MRT). A core stabilization exercise program was applied for the participants in the CSE group for 3 days per week for a total of 6 weeks. In addition to the core stabilization exercises, myofascial relaxation technique with a roller massager was performed for 3 days per week for 6 weeks for the participants in the CSE+MRT group. Participants were assessed in terms of pain, low back disability, lower body flexibility, kinesiophobia, core stability endurance, spinal mobility, gait characteristics and quality of life both pre- and post-treatment.

Results: It was found that the improvement in core stability endurance (p=0.031) and spinal mobility (in the sagittal plane) (p=0.022) was greater in the CSE+MRT group compared to the CSE group. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of pain, low back disability, lower body flexibility, kinesiophobia, gait characteristics and quality of life (p>0.05).

Conclusion: The current study suggests that myofascial release technique with a roller massager combined with core stabilization exercises can be a better choice in the treatment of NSLBP in elderly.

Clinicaltrialsgov Identifier: NCT03898089.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S223905DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6790630PMC
December 2019

Core stability and balance in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

Rheumatol Int 2019 Aug 12;39(8):1389-1396. Epub 2019 Jun 12.

Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Dokuz Eylül University, Izmir, Turkey.

The main purpose of this study was to compare core stability and balance between ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients and healthy controls. AS patients diagnosed according to the Modified New York criteria and healthy age- and sex-matched controls were included in the study. Clinical status of AS patients was assessed using Bath AS Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath AS Functional Index (BASFI), Bath AS Spinal Mobility Index (BASMI). For evaluation of core stability, static and dynamic core endurance and hip strength were assessed. Trunk flexor and extensor endurance, lateral side bridge tests for static core endurance; modified sit-up test for dynamic core endurance were used. Hip strength was measured with a hand-held dynamometer. Biodex Balance System was used to assess static and dynamic balance. Bilateral standing static and dynamic postural stability, single leg standing postural stability and limits of stability test results were recorded. 64 AS patients (40 male, 24 female) and 64 healthy controls (39 male, 25 female) were assessed. Static and dynamic core endurance test results, hip abductor strength were significantly higher in control group than AS group (p < 0.05). Static postural stability and left leg postural stability test results were significantly better in control group than AS group (p < 0.05). Overall, forward, backward, and right, limits of stability test results were significantly higher in control group (p < 0.05). The results of our study demonstrate that AS has negative effects on core stability and balance. It would be beneficial to add core stability and balance training to AS patients' rehabilitation program.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00296-019-04341-5DOI Listing
August 2019

The relationship between learning styles and academic performance in TURKISH physiotherapy students.

BMC Med Educ 2018 Dec 4;18(1):291. Epub 2018 Dec 4.

School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Dokuz Eylul University, 35340, Inciralti, Izmir, Turkey.

Background: Learning style refers to the unique ways an individual processes and retains new information and skills. In this study, we aimed to identify the learning styles of Turkish physiotherapy students and investigate the relationship between academic performance and learning style subscale scores in order to determine whether the learning styles of physiotherapy students could influence academic performance.

Methods: The learning styles of 184 physiotherapy students were determined using the Grasha-Riechmann Student Learning Style Scales. Cumulative grade point average was accepted as a measure of academic performance. The Kruskal-Wallis test was conducted to compare academic performance among the six learning style groups (Independent, Dependent, Competitive, Collaborative, Avoidant, and Participant).

Results: The most common learning style was Collaborative (34.8%). Academic performance was negatively correlated with Avoidant score (p < 0.001, r = - 0.317) and positively correlated with Participant score (p < 0.001, r = 0.400). The academic performance of the Participant learning style group was significantly higher than that of all the other groups (p < 0.003).

Conclusions: Although Turkish physiotherapy students most commonly exhibited a Collaborative learning style, the Participant learning style was associated with significantly higher academic performance. Teaching strategies that encourage more participant-style learning may be effective in increasing academic performance among Turkish physiotherapy students.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12909-018-1400-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6278061PMC
December 2018

The effects of 8-week water-running program on exercise capacity in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a controlled trial.

Rheumatol Int 2019 01 14;39(1):59-65. Epub 2018 Nov 14.

Division of Pediatric Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir, Turkey.

Exercise capacity has been reported to be lower in children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA). Therefore, the aim was to investigate the effects of an 8-week water-based exercise program on exercise capacity in children with JIA. Forty-two children with JIA were divided into two groups as: exercise group [n = 21, water-running, moderate-intensity exercise (60-70%), two times/week], and control group (n = 21, no additional treatment other than the prescribed medication). All children were assessed at baseline and post-intervention in terms of physical and disease-related characteristics, pain at rest and in activity (visual analog scale), range of motion (Escola Paulista de Medicina Range of Motion Scale), aerobic exercise capacity (cycle ergometer), and anaerobic exercise capacity (Wingate Test). Anaerobic exercise capacity was found to be improved in the exercise group [baseline: 5.54 W/kg (IQR 25/75: 4.07/6.88 W/kg) vs. post-intervention: 6.0 W/kg (IQR 25/75: 4.8/7.4 W/kg), p = 0.002], while no improvements were observed in the control group [baseline: 5.29 W/kg (IQR 25/75: 4.75/5.85 W/kg) vs. post-intervention: 5.5 watts/kg (IQR 25/75: 5.0/6.1 W/kg), p = 0.076]. The amount of the changes related to anaerobic exercise capacity were higher in the exercise group [exercise group: 0.6 W/kg (IQR 25/75: 0.3/1.3 W/kg) vs. control group: 0.2 W/kg (IQR 25/75: - 0.1/0.5 W/kg), p = 0.024]. No changes were detected related to aerobic exercise capacity in any of the groups (p > 0.05). An 8-week water-running program might be beneficial to improve anaerobic exercise capacity, but it is not enough to improve the aerobic exercise capacity in children with JIA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00296-018-4209-8DOI Listing
January 2019

The Turkish version of the MedRisk instrument for measuring patient satisfaction: measurement properties in physical therapy care among inpatients.

Disabil Rehabil 2020 01 6;42(2):247-254. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir, Turkey.

Our aim was to cross culturally adapt the MedRisk instrument for measuring patient satisfaction with physical therapy care for Turkish-speaking inpatients, provide information about its measurement properties, and determine the socio-demographic factors influencing satisfaction of Turkish patients. This was a cross-sectional, measurement-focused study. The MedRisk instrument for measuring patient satisfaction was translated and adapted into Turkish. Two hundred four inpatients with different health conditions from different units of a large university hospital were assessed using the Turkish version of the MedRisk instrument for measuring patient satisfaction. Forty-two patients were reassessed after 72 h. Construct validity, internal consistency, convergent validity, criterion-referenced validity, floor and ceiling effects, and test-retest reliability were evaluated. Factor analysis showed a two-factor structure. Cronbach's alpha values for the internal consistency ranged between 0.49 and 0.81. Corrected item-total correlations ranged between 0.29 and 0.72. Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged between 0.67 and 0.97, standard errors of measurement ranged between 0.34 and 2.61 points, and substantially good agreement was achieved. Eleven of twelve items were positively correlated with the global measures. No floor or ceiling effects were detected. The satisfaction level of inpatients was high. Our results suggested that the Turkish version of the MedRisk instrument for measuring patient satisfaction is a quite reliable and valid measurement to evaluate patient satisfaction with physical therapy care in Turkish-speaking inpatients. We determined that Turkish inpatients are highly satisfied with their physical therapy care, and they consider the patient-physical therapist relationship important.Implications for rehabilitationThe Turkish version of the MedRisk instrument for measuring patient satisfaction is a reliable and valid translation of the original MedRisk instrument for measuring patient satisfaction.However, it should be noted that three items from the original version were excluded.Clinicians and relevant researchers can use this instrument to evaluate satisfaction with physical therapy care among Turkish-speaking inpatients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09638288.2018.1494216DOI Listing
January 2020

Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Turkish version of the pain catastrophizing scale among patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

J Phys Ther Sci 2016 Jan 30;28(1):298-303. Epub 2016 Jan 30.

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Dokuz Eylul University School of Medicine, Turkey.

[Purpose] This study describes the cultural adaptation, validation, and reliability of the Turkish version of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. [Methods] The validity of the Turkish version of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale was assessed by evaluating data quality (missing data and floor and ceiling effects), principal components analysis, internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha), and construct validity (Spearman's rho). Reproducibility analyses included standard measurement error, minimum detectable change, limits of agreement, and intraclass correlation coefficients. [Results] Sixty-four adult patients with ankylosing spondylitis with a mean age of 42.2 years completed the study. Factor analysis revealed that all questionnaire items could be grouped into two factors. Excellent internal consistency was found, with a Chronbach's alpha value of 0.95. Reliability analyses showed an intraclass correlation coefficient (95% confidence interval) of 0.96 for the total score. There was a low correlation coefficient between the Turkish version of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale and body mass index, pain levels at rest and during activity, health-related quality of life, and fear and avoidance behaviors. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicate that the Turkish version of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale is a valid and reliable clinical and research tool for patients with ankylosing spondylitis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1589/jpts.28.298DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4756024PMC
January 2016

Prediction of postural sway velocity by foot posture index, foot size and plantar pressure values in unilateral stance.

Eklem Hastalik Cerrahisi 2013 ;24(3):144-8

Dokuz Eylül Üniversity, School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, 35340 İnciraltı, İzmir, Turkey.

Objectives: This study aims to assess whether the plantar pressure, the foot posture index (FPI) and foot size can predict the postural sway velocity in terms of postural stability in unilateral stance.

Patients And Methods: A total of 236 feet of 118 participants (62 males, 56 females; mean age 22.1±3.1 years; range 18 to 36 years) were enrolled. The feet were classified as prone, normal and supine based on the FPI. Postural sway velocity during unilateral stance with eye open (US-EO) and eye closed (US-EC) condition was measured using the Balance Master. Plantar pressure for each foot was measured from 10 different areas using EMED-M pedobarography. The force-time-area (FTA) integral was calculated based on the plantar pressure values, while standardized foot size (SFS) was calculated dividing foot width by foot length. The one-way ANOVA was used to determine differences in postural sway velocity between the groups. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to evaluate the predictability of the postural sway velocity.

Results: The postural sway velocities in US-EO condition were similar among three groups (p>0.05). In the US-EC condition, the highest postural sway velocity in the prone feet and lowest postural sway velocity in the supine feet were measured (p<0.05). There was a significant relationship between the postural sway velocity which was measured in the US-EC condition and SFS (β= 0.141, p<0.05), FTA integral under the hindfoot (β= -0.127, p<0.05) and FPI values (β= 0.246, p<0.05).

Conclusion: The predictive value of FTA integral and SFS parameters for postural sway velocity is lower in unilateral stance. The postural sway velocity is rather associated with FPI and increases by pronation of the foot.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5606/ehc.2013.32DOI Listing
February 2016

The effects of resistance training on cardiovascular disease risk factors in postmenopausal women: a randomized-controlled trial.

Health Care Women Int 2012 ;33(12):1072-85

School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Dokuz Eylül University, İzmir, Turkey.

Our aim was to determine the effects of resistance training on cardiovascular risk factors in postmenopausal women. Forty-five women were included in the study. Resistance exercises were done with an intensity of 60% of 1-Repetition Maximum, for 12 weeks. Heart rate, blood pressure, estimated peak VO(2), lipid profiles, and homocysteine levels were evaluated. There were significant time and group interactions for body mass index (p = .02), heart rate (p = .04), systolic blood pressure (p = .03), estimated mean peak VO(2) (p = .00), and total cholesterol (p = .00), but there were no interactions with other evaluated parameters. Resistance training has beneficial effects on particular cardiovascular risk factors in postmenopausal women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07399332.2011.645960DOI Listing
January 2013

Use of tape measure in people with or without back pain in assessment of reposition error.

Turk Neurosurg 2011 ;21(3):290-5

Dokuz Eylul University, School of Physical Therapy, Inciraltı, Izmir, Turkey.

Aim: Examining lumbar repositioning error (RE) using a tape measure in nonspecific low back pain (NLBP) and control groups and determining whether RE is different in subjects with nonspecific back pain than in controlled subjects.

Material And Methods: The study was totally applied to 36 subjects of whom 18 were healthy subjects and 18 were NLBP patients. The ability of the subjects to take the targeted positions was assessed. In subjects with NLBP the evaluation of the pain was assessed by using Visual Analog Scale (VAS), and disability measurement was made using Oswestry Disability Index (ODI).

Results: RE was found in all the measurements except for lumbar flexion with eyes open(p=0.15) in control group (p < 0.05). There were RE for all the measurements in NLBP grpup (p < 0.05). When RE of two groups compared only lumbar flexion with eyes open measurement (p = 0.04) in NLBP group was higher then control group.

Conclusion: As a result of our study, it has been seen that RE measurement of the lumbar spine with tape measure, which is cheap and clinically practical, is a reliable method, and can be used in the assessment of NLBP patients and in the determination of the rehabilitation program.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5137/1019-5149.JTN.3782-10.2DOI Listing
December 2011