Publications by authors named "Nuanchawee Wetprasit"

9 Publications

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Quality assessment of noodles made from blends of rice flour and canna starch.

Food Chem 2015 Jul 31;179:85-93. Epub 2015 Jan 31.

Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Science, Ramkhamhaeng University, Bangkok 10240, Thailand.

Canna starch and its derivatives (retrograded, retrograded debranched, and cross-linked) were evaluated for their suitability to be used as prebiotic sources in a rice noodle product. Twenty percent of the rice flour was replaced with these tested starches, and the noodles obtained were analyzed for morphology, cooking qualities, textural properties, and capability of producing short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Cross-linked canna starch could increase tensile strength and elongation of rice noodles. Total dietary fiber (TDF) content of noodles made from rice flour was 3.0% and increased to 5.1% and 7.3% when rice flour was replaced with retrograded and retrograded debranched starches, respectively. Cooking qualities and textural properties of noodles containing 20% retrograded debranched starch were mostly comparable, while the capability of producing SCFAs and butyric acid was superior to the control rice noodles; the cooked noodle strips also showed fewer tendencies to stick together.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2015.01.119DOI Listing
July 2015

Chebulin: Terminalia chebula Retz. fruit-derived peptide with angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory activity.

Biotechnol Appl Biochem 2015 Nov-Dec;62(6):746-53. Epub 2015 Mar 19.

Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) plays an important role in blood pressure regulation. In this study, an ACE-hexapeptide inhibitor (Asp-Glu-Asn-Ser-Lys-Phe) designated as chebulin was produced from the fruit protein of Terminalia chebula Retz. by pepsin digestion, ultrafiltrated through a 3 KDa cut-off membrane, a reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, and nano-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Chebulin was found to inhibit ACE in a noncompetitive manner, as supported by the structural model. It bounds to ACE by the hydrogen bond, hydrophobic and ionic interactions via the interactions of C-terminal Phe (Phe-6), and N-terminal residues (Asp-1 and Glu-2) with the amino acid residues on noncatalytic sites of the ACE. The results showed that chebulin derived from fruits of T. chebula Retz. is a potential ACE-peptide inhibitor that could be used as a functional food additive for the prevention of hypertension and as an alternative to ACE inhibitor drug.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bab.1321DOI Listing
October 2016

Eriosema chinense: a rich source of antimicrobial and antioxidant flavonoids.

Phytochemistry 2013 Dec 15;96:353-9. Epub 2013 Oct 15.

Department of Chemistry and Center for Innovation in Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Ramkhamhaeng University, Hua Mark, Bangkapi, Bangkok 10240, Thailand.

Six prenylated flavonoids, (2R,3S)-3,5,4'-trihydroxy-6″-6″dimethylpyrano(2″,3″:7,6)-8-(3″', 3″'-dimethylallyl)flavanone, (2R,3S)-3,5,2'-trihydroxy-4'-methoxy-6″,6″-dimethylpyrano(2″,3″:7,6)-8-(3″',3″'-dimethylallyl)flavanone, (2R,3R)-3,5,2',4'-tetrahydroxy-6″,6″-dimethylpyrano(2″,3″:7,6)-8-(3″',3″'-dimethylallyl)flavanone, 3,5,2',4'-tetrahydroxy-6″,6″-dimethylpyrano(2″,3″:7,6)-8-(3″',3″'-dimethylallyl)flavone, (2R,3R,2″'R)-3,5,2″'-trihydroxy-4'-methoxy-6″,6″-dimethylpyrano(2″,3″:7,6)-8-(3″'-methylbut-3″'-enyl)flavanone, (2R,3R)-3,5-dihydroxy-4'-methoxy-6″,6″-dimethylpyrano(2″,3″:7,6)-8-(2″',3″'-epoxy-3″'-methyl butyl)flavanone, an isoflavone, 6,7-dimethoxy-5,2',4'-trihydroxyisoflavone, and octaeicosanyl-trans-p-coumarate together with 12 known compounds, were isolated from roots of Eriosema chinense. This structural elucidation was determined by spectroscopic methods. Several isolates and derivatives were evaluated for their antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. Results obtained provide additional evidence showing that the presence of both the free phenolic OH and the lipophilic prenyl groups are crucial for potent antimicrobial activity against yeast, gram positive and gram negative bacteria, whereas the presence of free phenolic OH group is required for strong radical scavenging property.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.phytochem.2013.06.004DOI Listing
December 2013

Bioactivities of Jc-SCRIP, a type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein from Jatropha curcas seed coat.

Chem Biol Drug Des 2013 Oct;82(4):453-62

Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, 50 Ngamwongwan Rd., Chatujak, Bangkok 10900, Thailand.

In this study, a type 1 RIP, designated as Jc-SCRIP, was first isolated from the seed coat of Jatropha curcas Linn. It was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel™ and CM-cellulose columns. Purification fold of Jc-SCRIP increased 113.8 times, and the yield was 1.13% of the total protein in the final step. It was shown to be a monomeric glycoprotein with a molecular mass of 38 938 Da, as determined by MALDI-TOF/MS. It exhibited hemagglutination activity and possessed strong N-glycosidase activity. The antimicrobial activity of Jc-SCRIP was tested against nine human pathogenic bacteria and one fungus; the most potent inhibitory activity was against Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 12228, with minimum inhibitory concentration value of 0.20 μm. Jc-SCRIP demonstrated in vitro cytotoxicity against human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7), a colon adenocarcinoma (SW620), and a liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2), with IC50 values of 0.15, 0.25, and 0.40 mm, respectively. The results suggested that Jc-SCRIP may be a potential natural antimicrobial and anticancer agent in medical applications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cbdd.12175DOI Listing
October 2013

Larvicidal activity of a toxin from the seeds of Jatropha curcas Linn. against Aedes aegypti Linn. and Culex quinquefasciatus Say.

Trop Biomed 2012 Jun;29(2):286-96

Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok, Thailand.

The larvicidal effects of the crude protein extract and purified toxin, Jc-SCRIP, from the seed coat of Jatropha curcas Linn. against the third instar larvae of mosquitoes, Aedes aegypti Linn. and Culex quinquefasciatus Say, were investigated. This test compared the effects of the purified toxin with crude protein extracts from seed kernels of J. curcas and Ricinus communis. At various concentrations of purified toxin and crude protein extract, the larval mortality of both Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus were positively correlated with increased exposure time. The larvae of Cx. quinquefasciatus were more susceptible to the toxin and both extracts than the larvae of Ae. aegypti. After 24 hours of exposure, the extract showed larvicidal activity against Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus with (LC50) values of 3.89 mg/ml and 0.0575 mg/ml, respectively. The toxin, Jc-SCRIP, showed larvicidal activity against Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus with (LC50) values of 1.44 mg/ml and 0.0303 mg/ ml, respectively. These results indicated that the crude protein extract and Jc-SCRIP were more toxic to the third instar larvae of Cx. quinquefasciatus than that of Ae. aegypti. The potent larvicidal activities of the seed coat extract and the Jc-SCRIP toxin from J. curcas suggest that they may be used as bioactive agents to control the mosquito population.
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June 2012

Acetylenic fatty acids, triglyceride and triterpenes from the leaves of Hymenodictyon excelsum.

Chem Pharm Bull (Tokyo) 2009 Aug;57(8):860-2

Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Rangsit University, Pathumtanee, Thailand.

Two new acetylenic fatty acids (1, 2), a new triglyceride (3), along with eleven known compounds including 3-oxo-11alpha,12alpha-epoxyurs-13beta,28-olide (4) previously reported as a synthetic compound, have been isolated from the leaves of Hymenodictyon excelsum. The structural identification was established from spectroscopic data.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1248/cpb.57.860DOI Listing
August 2009

Application of Streptomyces and Brevibacterium cholesterol oxidase for total serum cholesterol assay by the enzymatic kinetic method.

Clin Chim Acta 2006 Oct 29;372(1-2):103-11. Epub 2006 Mar 29.

Division of Clinical Chemistry, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400, Thailand.

Background: Using non-esterified cholesterol standard, Brevibacterium and Streptomyces are found as suitable sources of cholesterol oxidase for kinetic cholesterol assay. For clinical use, we investigated the suitability of these enzymes for cholesterol determination in human serum.

Methods: We compared the performance of reagents containing 2 enzymes for the kinetic determination of total serum cholesterol with the standardized endpoint method.

Results: Reagent containing Streptomyces enzyme was more sensitive than that of Brevibacterium, with linearity up to 20.7 and 2.6 mmol/l, respectively. The analytical reaction for Streptomyces showed a shorter lag phase (148 s) and a steeper slope (absorbance vs. time) than that of Brevibacterium (246 s). The assay using Streptomyces reagent was precise and accurate and compared favorably with the endpoint method (y=1.06x-0.15, r=0.996, bias=0.21 mmol/l). Hemoglobin as high as 7.5 g/l did not interfere while turbidity greater than 2+ (absorbance >0.778 at 670 nm) and bilirubin concentrations >171.0 micromol/l did interfere (in a negative interference). Reagent was stable up to at least 8 weeks.

Conclusions: The Streptomyces cholesterol oxidase, with 3,4-dichlorophenol, proved a suitable source for serum total cholesterol determination by the kinetic method.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cca.2006.03.030DOI Listing
October 2006

A study to implement early diagnosis of HIV infection in infants born to infected mothers.

Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health 2003 ;34 Suppl 3:221-6

National Institute of Health, Department of Medical Sciences, Nonthaburi, Thailand.

A protocol for detecting HIV DNA from specimens collected on filter papers and the effect of storage temperatures on determination of HIV DNA from dried blood spots has been developed and optimized. Blood specimens collected from HIV-1 infected and normal persons were spotted onto blood collection cards (Whatman BFC 180). The HIV DNA was extracted by phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol and was detected for C2V4 of HIV-1 env by nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR). One set was stored at -20 degrees C for 14 weeks, another at 37 degrees C for 1 week and then kept at -20 degrees C for 13 weeks and a third set at 25 degrees C for I week and then -20 degrees C for 13 weeks. The dried blood spots from each set were detected for the HIV DNA every 2 weeks for 14 weeks. The C2V4 region of HIV env DNA was determined from small amounts of the dried blood collected on the filter papers. The nested PCR procedure could detect as few as 5 copies of HIV proviral DNA, and HIV DNA could be detected from specimens with viral loads of 2x 10(4) copies/ml. HIV DNA could be detected from specimens collected at all temperatures tested for at least 14 weeks. Therefore, laboratory diagnosis of HIV infection can be done by PCR on dried blood spots. These techniques will be useful as a tool for studying the epidemiology of HIV infection among populations of interest such as mother to child infection using newborn screening specimens.
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July 2005

Performance of four sources of cholesterol oxidase for serum cholesterol determination by the enzymatic endpoint method.

Clin Chim Acta 2004 Jan;339(1-2):135-45

Division of Clinical Chemistry, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400, Thailand.

Background: Cholesterol oxidase is used for the determination of serum cholesterol. It can be derived from Streptomyces, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Cellulomonas, and Brevibacterium. This study compared the performance characteristics of four enzymes in the endpoint cholesterol determination.

Methods: Using the Mega analyzer, we studied assay optimization, linearity, precision, recovery, interference, stability, and compared 110 patient samples.

Results: The linearity for the four enzymes was up to 13.0 mmol/l at the optimal enzyme activity. The average within-run CVs ranged from 1.6% to 1.9% and between-day ranged from 2.8% to 3.0%, within the NCEP analytical criteria. The analytical recoveries obtained from four reagents ( approximately 96.5%) were excellent. The assays using these enzyme sources compared favorably with the commercial method and appeared accurate near the clinical decision cut-points. Hemoglobin concentration at 1.9 g/l interfered with the P. fluorescens cholesterol oxidase. Bilirubin caused a negative interference while lipemia generated a positive interference with all enzyme sources. Reagents were stable up to 6 weeks.

Conclusions: Streptomyces, Cellulomonas, and Brevibacterium were essentially analytically equivalent. Streptomyces and Cellulomonas cholesterol oxidase are one-quarter as expensive Brevibacterium. Cellulomonas is a new source of cholesterol oxidase for determining serum cholesterol by the endpoint method.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cccn.2003.10.005DOI Listing
January 2004