Publications by authors named "Nour Bundogji"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Toric Implantable Collamer Lens for the Treatment of Myopic Astigmatism.

Clin Ophthalmol 2021 6;15:2893-2906. Epub 2021 Jul 6.

Hoopes Vision Research Center, Hoopes Vision, Draper, UT, 84020, USA.

Purpose: To report visual outcomes following surgical correction of myopic astigmatism with Visian Toric implantable collamer lens (ICL) (STAAR Surgical, Monrovia, CA, USA) at a single tertiary refractive center in the United States.

Patients And Methods: Toric ICL was implanted in 96 eyes (55 patients) with mean preoperative sphere of -8.98 ± 3.04 diopters (D) and cylinder of -2.67 ± 1.02 D from December 2018 to February 2021. Primary visual outcomes of efficacy, safety, stability, predictability of refractive correction, and astigmatic analysis were reported at three and twelve months postoperatively. Secondary subjective outcomes included patient-reported dry eye symptoms and glare/halos at postoperative visits. Other secondary outcomes were biometric data and postoperative vault over time.

Results: At three and twelve months, 75 and 46 eyes were evaluated, respectively. At twelve months, the mean manifest refraction spherical equivalent (MRSE) was -0.23 ± 0.47 D with 93% achieving within ±1.00 D of target refraction. The manifest refractive cylinder (MRC) at twelve months was -0.73 ± 0.51 D, with 86% within ±1.00 D of target. Uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA) was 20/20 or better in 74% of eyes at twelve months. No patients lost ≥2 lines of corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) at twelve months. The mean angle of error was -0.9 ± 10.2° at three months and -1.6 ± 12.8° at twelve months. One patient required bilateral lens rotation, four patients underwent secondary enhancement with LASIK/PRK, and seven patients underwent postoperative limbal relaxing incisions.

Conclusion: This initial single-site experience finds Toric ICL implantation for myopic astigmatism to be safe and effective. Patients can achieve markedly improved UDVA in a single surgery with stable vision over time and minimal adverse subjective symptoms.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S321095DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8274236PMC
July 2021

Intraocular Acrylic Allergy: Is it Something to Sneeze at?

Ophthalmol Ther 2021 Jul 14. Epub 2021 Jul 14.

University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.

Cataract surgery is most commonly performed with acrylic intraocular lens (IOL) implantation. To date, there have been no reported cases of intraocular acrylic allergy despite increasing rates of acrylic-induced contact dermatitis elsewhere in the body. Concern regarding acrylate sensitization is gaining traction in the ophthalmology community. This commentary explores the lack of intraocular atopy and whether an acrylic allergy necessitates extensive preoperative consideration.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40123-021-00374-xDOI Listing
July 2021

Clearing the Haze: Navigating Corneal Refractive Surgery in Patients with Posterior Polymorphous Corneal Dystrophy.

Ophthalmol Ther 2021 Jun 24. Epub 2021 Jun 24.

University of Arizona College of Medicine Phoenix, Phoenix, AZ, USA.

Posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy (PPCD) is a corneal disorder of the endothelium and Descemet's membrane. Although reports of corneal refractive surgery including laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK), photorefractive keratectomy (PRK), and small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) in PPCD are minimal, these procedures have been shown to be safe and effective in this patient population. Proceeding with corneal refractive surgery in eyes with PPCD raises concerns regarding corneal integrity, including long-term biomechanical instability, risk of ectasia, endothelial cell loss, disease progression, and corneal decompensation. Thus, LASIK, PRK, and SMILE should be considered with caution. This commentary explores the patient characteristics associated with favorable surgical outcomes and factors that weigh against proceeding with refractive surgery.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40123-021-00364-zDOI Listing
June 2021

Applications of Gold and Silver Nanoparticles in the Treatment of Acne Vulgaris: A Systematic Review.

J Drugs Dermatol 2021 Jun;20(6):666-670

Background: Current treatments for acne are often accompanied by undesirable side effects and contribute to antibiotic resistance. Gold and silver nanoparticles are an emerging treatment method with potentially fewer adverse effects.

Objective: To evaluate current literature discussing the various uses of gold and silver nanoparticles in the potential treatment of acne vulgaris.

Materials And Methods: A search of PubMed, EMBASE, and SCOPUS databases was conducted through April 22, 2020 to identify studies using gold or silver nanoparticles in the treatment of acne vulgaris.

Results: 16 original articles were identified in the systematic review including clinical studies, case reports, and in vitro publications. The available evidence found gold nanoparticles to be effective when combined with phototherapy to target overactive sebaceous glands and bacteria, or to mediate localized, targeted drug release. Silver nanoparticles have primarily been studied for their antibacterial properties.

Conclusion: This review found gold and silver nanoparticles to be a promising treatment for acne vulgaris. Further randomized controlled studies are needed to determine clinical efficacy and the role of gold and silver nanoparticles in the treatment algorithm for acne. J Drugs Dermatol. 2021;20(6):666-670. doi:10.36849/JDD.5762.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.36849/JDD.2021.5762DOI Listing
June 2021

A survey of adult preferences regarding recruitment for pediatric research.

Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol 2020 Aug 15;135:110108. Epub 2020 May 15.

UC San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, CA, USA; Pediatric Otolaryngology, Rady Children's San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA; Department of Surgery, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.

Objective: Although subject recruitment is one of the most critical aspects of human subject research, there is a lack of studies prospectively examining the recruitment preferences of adults for research involving children.

Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of adults accompanying patients at an otolaryngology clinic in a pediatric medical center. Anonymous questionnaires were distributed in English and Spanish to one adult for every patient. Questions assessed the respondent's preferences for research recruitment including contact method preferences, contact preferences for medical profession type, and whether they would expect a child to receive a small gift for participating in a research study. Fisher's exact tests were used to assess the association between the primary predictor, language, and each outcome.

Results: 566 surveys were collected. 505 (89.1%) were completed in English and 61 (10.7%) were completed in Spanish. Spanish-speaking respondents were more likely to prefer talking to a doctor (76.7%) than English-speaking respondents (40.1%, p < 0.05). Spanish-speaking respondents were more likely to prefer talking over the phone (48.3%) than English-speaking respondents (17.3%, p < 0.05). Spanish-speaking respondents were more likely to prefer communicating via text messaging (41.7%) than English-speaking respondents (16.3%, p < 0.05). English-speaking respondents were more likely to prefer communicating through the patient portal of an electronic health record (EHR) (19%) than Spanish-speaking respondents(3.3%, p < 0.05). Mothers were more likely to prefer talking to a nurse/physician's assistant (20%) than fathers (10%, p < 0.05). Mothers were more likely to prefer talking to research staff (20%) than fathers (9%, p < 0.05). Mothers were more likely to prefer communication via text-message (22%) than fathers (6%, p < 0.05). Spanish-speaking respondents were more likely to prefer pediatric patients receiving a small monetary gift for participating in clinical research (70%) than English-speaking respondents (30%, p < 0.05).

Conclusion: There was a significant association between preference for recruitment method and primary language spoken by the respondent. Further inquiry is required to understand these differences between English and Spanish speakers.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijporl.2020.110108DOI Listing
August 2020

Predictors of Pediatric Tracheostomy Outcomes in the United States.

Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2020 09 21;163(3):591-599. Epub 2020 Apr 21.

Division of Otolaryngology, Department of Surgery, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California, USA.

Objectives: To investigate the outcomes of pediatric tracheostomy as influenced by demographics and comorbidities.

Study Design: Retrospective national database review.

Setting: Fifty-two children's hospitals across the United States.

Subjects And Methods: Hospitalization records from Pediatric Health Information System database dated 2010 to 2018 with patients younger than 18 years and procedure codes for tracheostomy were extracted. The primary outcome was total length of stay. The secondary outcomes were 30-day readmission, mortality, and posttracheostomy length of stay.

Results: A total of 14,155 children were included in the analysis. The median total length of stay was 77 days and increased from 59 to 103 days between 2010 and 2018 ( < .001). The median posttracheostomy length of stay was 34 days and also increased from 27 to 49 days ( < .001). On multivariate regression analyses, the total and posttracheostomy lengths of stay were significantly increased in children younger than 1 year, patients of black race, hospitals in the non-West regions, those discharged to home, and those with comorbidities. Socioeconomic indicators such as insurance type and estimated household income were associated with no difference or small effect sizes. Regions and comorbidities were associated with differences in 30-day readmission (overall 26%), while in-hospital mortality was primarily associated with age and comorbidities (overall 8.6%).

Conclusion: Pediatric tracheostomy requires substantial health care resources with length of stay escalating over recent years. Age, race, region, discharge destination, and comorbidities were associated with differences in length of stay.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0194599820917620DOI Listing
September 2020

Modest benefit of frenotomy for infants with ankyloglossia and breastfeeding difficulties.

Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol 2020 Jun 9;133:109985. Epub 2020 Mar 9.

Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Rady Children's Hospital San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA; Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology, University of California San Diego School of Medicine, San Diego, CA, USA. Electronic address:

Introduction: With nationwide effort to increase breastfeeding rates in newborns and infants in recent years, there has been a dramatic increase in the diagnosis of ankyloglossia, and the resultant otolaryngology referral for frenotomy. Overall, there is a paucity of data on the expected benefit of frenotomy in this population and the subsequent breastfeeding rate. The objectives of this study were to assess the effect of office-based frenotomy on improving breastfeeding difficulties among infants with ankyloglossia from a patient-centered perspective and examine associated effects of frenotomy and ankyloglossia type on breastfeeding.

Methods: Maternal-infant dyads were referred to a tertiary care otolaryngology practice for assessment of ankyloglossia. A prospective cohort study was conducted in this population from January 2017 to September 2018. Mothers completed questionnaires regarding the quality of breastfeeding before the frenotomy procedure in the office and were subsequently contacted by phone to complete the same questionnaires 1 week and 3 months after the initial encounter. Treating physicians reported ankyloglossia type and expected improvement at the time of the procedure. Descriptive statistics and paired analyses were used to analyze post-frenotomy breastfeeding outcomes and ascertain likelihood of improvement.

Results: During the study period, the mothers of 343 infants agreed to participate in the study by completing the initial questionnaire. Of these infants, 314 (91.5%) underwent frenotomy. Most infants were classified as having either type I (35.3%) or type II (45.2%) ankyloglossia with 16.9% having posterior ankyloglossia and 2.6% with no ankyloglossia. At 1-week post-frenotomy the largest group of patients (35%) had mild improvement in breastfeeding abilities compared to baseline with 14% and 7% reporting moderate or marked improvement respectively. At 3 months after the initial consultation, significantly more patients reported moderate (27%) or marked (17%) improvement when compared to baseline although the exclusively breastfeeding rate at 3 months was low at 20.3% for this cohort.

Conclusions: This prospective study demonstrated that frenotomy had a modestly positive effect on breastfeeding ability from the mother's perspective in infants referred for ankyloglossia. It is important to educate patients on the multi-factorial nature of breastfeeding and to set realistic expectations prior to recommending the procedure.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijporl.2020.109985DOI Listing
June 2020

Psychometric Evaluation of the Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation Scale for Pediatric Patients.

Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2020 Feb 10;162(2):248-254. Epub 2019 Dec 10.

University of California San Diego School of Medicine, San Diego, California, USA.

Objective: To evaluate the psychometric properties of the nasal obstruction symptom scale within a sample of pediatric patients undergoing septoplasty or functional septorhinoplasty.

Study Design: This was a prospective study with nasal obstruction symptom scale evaluations conducted pre- and postoperatively.

Setting: A tertiary care pediatric hospital.

Subjects And Methods: Pediatric patients underwent septoplasty or functional septorhinoplasty (FSR) from January 2013 to January 2017. Reliability of the scale was assessed through measures of internal consistency. In addition, item response models of each item were evaluated to assess how well each item captured individuals with varying levels of nasal obstruction. Study authors assessed face validity, and construct validity was assessed by correlation measures between items and exploratory factor analysis.

Results: A total of 136 patients, ages 8 to 18 years with a mean age of 15.7 ± 2.1 years, completed pre- and postoperative evaluations. Internal consistency of the scale was high (Cronbach's α = 0.83). Predominantly a unidimensional scale resulted from exploratory factor analyses. Item response models indicate questions capture low to moderate levels of nasal obstruction within this population. Additional analyses show the scale functions similarly between septoplasty and FSR patients.

Conclusion: The Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation scale is a robust tool that may be incorporated as a subjective evaluation of severity of nasal obstruction among pediatric patients undergoing a septoplasty or functional septorhinoplasty.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0194599819890835DOI Listing
February 2020

Pediatric septoplasty and functional septorhinoplasty: A quality of life outcome study.

Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol 2018 Aug 25;111:16-20. Epub 2018 May 25.

Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Rady Children's Hospital, 3020 Children's Way, San Diego, CA 92123, USA; University of California San Diego School of Medicine, 9500 Gilman Drive, San Diego, CA 92093, USA.

Objective: This study assessed disease-specific quality-of-life outcomes among pediatric patients undergoing septoplasty or functional septorhinoplasty. The Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation (NOSE) score was obtained pre- and post-operatively. Additional analyses determined whether demographics, nasal trauma, prior nasal surgery, or allergic rhinitis history affected NOSE scores.

Methods: Patients undergoing septoplasty or functional septorhinoplasty were evaluated prospectively at a tertiary children's hospital. NOSE scores were assessed pre- and post-operatively. Change in NOSE score was analyzed using the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test, while multiple regression analysis evaluated factors associated with NOSE score change.

Results: 136 patients (mean age 15.7 ± 2.1 years) were evaluated; 52 (38.2%) underwent septoplasty while 84 (61.8%) underwent functional septorhinoplasty. Mean follow-up was 3.6 ± 5.1 months. There was a statistically significant decrease in NOSE score from pre-operative septoplasty and functional septorhinoplasty: median = 75 to post-operative septoplasty: median = 20 (z = -5.9, p < 0.001) and functional septorhinoplasty: median = 15 (z = -7.9, p < 0.001). Gender, age, nasal trauma, prior nasal surgery, and allergic rhinitis did not have a significant effect on NOSE score change for either group. Additional surgery at the time of procedure was not a confounding variable in the relationship between surgery type and NOSE score. A NOSE Scale reliability analysis demonstrated high internal consistency with Cronbach's α of 0.83 across septoplasty and functional septorhinoplasty patients.

Conclusion: There was significant improvement in disease-specific quality-of-life in pediatric patients undergoing septoplasty or functional septorhinoplasty. Gender, nasal trauma, prior nasal surgery, and allergic rhinitis did not significantly affect NOSE scores in either group.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijporl.2018.05.016DOI Listing
August 2018
-->