Publications by authors named "Nora Tahallah"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Lipid mapping in human dystrophic muscle by cluster-time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging.

J Lipid Res 2008 Feb 17;49(2):438-54. Epub 2007 Nov 17.

Laboratoire de Spectrométrie de Masse, Institut de Chimie des Substances Naturelles, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Unité Propre de Recherche 2301, Gif sur Yvette Cedex, France.

Human striated muscle samples, from male control and Duchenne muscular dystrophy-affected children, were subjected to cluster-time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (cluster-ToF-SIMS) imaging using a 25 keV Bi(3)(+) liquid metal ion gun under static SIMS conditions. Spectra and ion density maps, or secondary ion images, were acquired in both positive and negative ion mode over several areas of 500 x 500 microm(2) (image resolution, 256 x 256 pixels). Characteristic distributions of various lipids were observed. Vitamin E and phosphatidylinositols were found to concentrate within the cells, whereas intact phosphocholines accumulated over the most damaged areas of the dystrophic muscles, together with cholesterol and sphingomyelin species. Fatty acyl chain composition varied depending on the region, allowing estimation of the local damage extent.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1194/jlr.M700421-JLR200DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2438276PMC
February 2008

Coenzyme binding during catalysis is beneficial for the stability of 4-hydroxyacetophenone monooxygenase.

J Biol Chem 2005 Sep 27;280(37):32115-21. Epub 2005 Jul 27.

Department of Biomolecular Mass Spectrometry, Bijvoet Center for Biomolecular Research and Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences, Utrecht University.

The NADPH-dependent dimeric flavoenzyme 4-hydroxyacetophenone monooxygenase (HAPMO) catalyzes Baeyer-Villiger oxidations of a wide range of ketones, thereby generating esters or lactones. In the current work, we probed HAPMO-coenzyme complexes present during the enzyme catalytic cycle with the aim to gain mechanistic insight. Moreover, we investigated the structural role of the nicotinamide coenzyme. For these studies, we used (i) wild type HAPMO, (ii) the R339A variant, which is active but has a low affinity toward NADPH, and (iii) the R440A variant, which is inactive but has a high affinity toward NADPH. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was used as the primary tool to directly observe noncovalent protein-coenzyme complexes in real time. These analyzes showed for the first time that the nicotinamide coenzyme remains bound to HAPMO during the entire catalytic cycle of the NADPH oxidase reaction. This may also have implications for other homologous Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases. Together with the observations that NADP(+) only weakly interacts with oxidized enzyme and that HAPMO is mainly in the reduced form during catalysis, we concluded that NADP(+) interacts tightly with the reduced form of HAPMO. We also demonstrated that the association with the coenzyme is crucial for enzyme stability. The interaction with the coenzyme analog 3-aminopyridine adenine dinucleotide phosphate (AADP(+)) strongly enhanced the thermal stability of wild type HAPMO. This coenzyme-induced stabilization may also be important for related enzymes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M503758200DOI Listing
September 2005

Cofactor-dependent assembly of the flavoenzyme vanillyl-alcohol oxidase.

J Biol Chem 2002 Sep 9;277(39):36425-32. Epub 2002 Jul 9.

Department of Biomolecular Mass Spectrometry, Bijvoet Center for Biomolecular Research and Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences, Utrecht University, Sorbonnelaan 16, 3584 CA Utrecht, The Netherlands.

The oligomerization of the flavoprotein vanillyl-alcohol oxidase (VAO) and its site-directed mutant H61T was studied by mass spectrometry. Native VAO has a covalently bound FAD and forms primarily octameric assemblies of 507 kDa. H61T is purified as a FAD-free apoprotein and mainly exists as a dimeric species of 126 kDa. Binding of FAD to apoH61T rapidly restores enzyme activity and induces octamerization, although association of H61T dimers seems not to be crucial for enzyme activity. Reconstitution of H61T with the cofactor analog 5'-ADP also promotes octamerization. FMN on the other hand, interacts with apoH61T without stimulating dimer association. These results are in line with observations made for several other flavoenzymes, which contain a Rossmann fold. Members of the VAO flavoprotein family do not contain a Rossmann fold but do share two conserved loops that are responsible for binding the pyrophosphate moiety of FAD. Therefore, the observed FAD-induced oligomerization might be general for this family. We speculate that upon FAD binding, small conformational changes in the ADP-binding pocket of the dimeric VAO species are transmitted to the protein surface, promoting oligomerization.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M205841200DOI Listing
September 2002

A covalent modification of NADP+ revealed by the atomic resolution structure of FprA, a Mycobacterium tuberculosis oxidoreductase.

Biochemistry 2002 Jul;41(28):8807-18

Dipartimento di Genetica e Microbiologia, Università di Pavia, via Abbiategrasso 207, 27100 Pavia, Italy.

FprA is a mycobacterial oxidoreductase that catalyzes the transfer of reducing equivalents from NADPH to a protein acceptor. We determined the atomic resolution structure of FprA in the oxidized (1.05 A resolution) and NADPH-reduced (1.25 A resolution) forms. The comparison of these FprA structures with that of bovine adrenodoxin reductase showed no significant overall differences. Hence, these enzymes, which belong to the structural family of the disulfide oxidoreductases, are structurally conserved in very distant organisms such as mycobacteria and mammals. Despite the conservation of the overall fold, the details of the active site of FprA show some peculiar features. In the oxidized enzyme complex, the bound NADP+ exhibits a covalent modification, which has been identified as an oxygen atom linked through a carbonylic bond to the reactive C4 atom of the nicotinamide ring. Mass spectrometry has confirmed this assignment. This NADP+ derivative is likely to form by oxidation of the NADP+ adduct resulting from nucleophilic attack by an active-site water molecule. A Glu-His pair is well positioned to activate the attacking water through a mechanism analogous to that of the catalytic triad in serine proteases. The NADP+ nicotinamide ring exhibits the unusual cis conformation, which may favor derivative formation. The physiological significance of this reaction is presently unknown. However, it could assist with drug-design studies in that the modified NADP+ could serve as a lead compound for the development of specific inhibitors.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/bi025858aDOI Listing
July 2002