Publications by authors named "Nooshin Babapour"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Small Cell Neuroendocrine Cervical Carcinoma: A Case Report.

J Family Reprod Health 2020 Dec;14(4):273-275

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Women's Health Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.

Small cell neuroendocrine cervical carcinoma is a neuroendocrine tumor with the great aggravation that comprises 0.5 to 3 percent of cervical tumors and progresses rapidly with early lymphogenous and hematogenous metastases. We reported a 40 years old woman with cervical cancer in stage IB2 that had radical hysterectomy with mistaken diagnosis of squamous cervical cancer. The disease has progressed after 50 days of surgery with a 6 cm tumor in vaginal cuff; review of pathology demonstrated small cell neuroendocrine cervical carcinoma. Recognition of this separate histopathological entity with IHC analysis is important. Chemoradiotherapy and multimodality therapeutic approaches could improve the survival rates.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.18502/jfrh.v14i4.5212DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8144480PMC
December 2020

Association of TNF-308 G>A polymorphism located in tumor necrosis factor a with the risk of developing cervical cancer and results of pap smear.

J Cell Biochem 2019 04 1;120(4):5444-5448. Epub 2018 Nov 1.

Department of Gynecology Oncology, Woman Health Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.

Tumor necrosis factor a (TNFa) is an inflammatory cytokine that plays a crucial role in the immune response and the progression of cervical lesions. There is a growing body of data evaluating the value of a genetic variant in the TNFa gene with the risk of developing cervical cancer. The aim of this study was to explore the association of a variant, TNF-308 G>A, residing in the TNFa gene with cervical cancer. A total of 91 women with cervical cancer and 161 women as the control group were recruited. DNA was extracted, and Taqman®-probes-based assay was used for genotyping. Our results showed that the minor allele frequency was 0.3 in total population, and the frequency of minor allele A was more in the case group compared with the control. The regression models in different genetic models also revealed that the allele A is a potential risk factor for the development of cervical cancer. In particular, in the dominant model, patients with AG and AA genotypes had a higher risk of developing cervical cancer with odds ratio (OR) of 2.75 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.57-4.83, <0.001) and OR of 7.27 (95%CI: 2.5-20.8, <0.001), compared with the GG genotype. Moreover, a similar outcome was obtained for smear test results. Our study demonstrated that TNF-308 G>A located on TNF-a was associated with the risk of cervical cancer, supporting further studies in a larger population and multicenter setting to show the value of emerging markers as risk stratification biomarkers in cervical cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jcb.27823DOI Listing
April 2019

Granulosa-cell tumor after ovarian stimulation: A case report.

Int J Reprod Biomed 2018 Jun;16(6):417-420

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.

Background: Ovarian superovulation and increased follicle-stimulating hormone concentration for infertility treatment may be the risk factors of developed granulosa-cell tumor. The aim of this report is to introduce a case of granulosa-cell tumor which was discovered after ovarian stimulation.

Case: A 31-yr-old woman with clinical presentation of massive abdominal distention was referred to the gynecology and oncology department of an academic hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences in Aug 2017. She had the history of secondary infertility and was undergoing In Vitro Fertilization protocol and ovarian stimulation, but, the cycle was canceled. The patient suffered from gradual abdominal distention one month after the end of IVF procedure despite pregnancy failure. 2-3 months after management of the ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, investigation revealed large ovarian mass and increased tumor marker inhibin. Exploratory laparotomy was performed and revealed stage III ovarian cancer. The final pathology report indicated juvenile granulosa cell tumor. So, optimal surgical staging and cytoreductive surgery without fertility preserving were perfumed. Chemotherapy was recommended due to the advanced stage of ovarian cancer. Unfortunately, she experienced metastatic diseases in pelvic and abdomen in less than six months; and currently is receiving the second and third line chemotherapy.

Conclusion: Persistent ovarian enlargement or ascites during or after infertility treatment should be carefully considered and managed.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6079308PMC
June 2018
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