Publications by authors named "Nooshin Abbasi"

11 Publications

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Cupping Therapy as an Anti-inflammation Therapy and Immunomodulator in Cancer Patients.

J Gastrointest Cancer 2021 Oct 1. Epub 2021 Oct 1.

Molecular Medicine Research Center, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Shahid Fahmideh Avenue, Hamadan, Iran.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12029-021-00701-2DOI Listing
October 2021

The clinical significance of histone deacetylase-8 in human breast cancer.

Pathol Res Pract 2021 Apr 1;220:153396. Epub 2021 Mar 1.

Molecular Medicine Research Center, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran. Electronic address:

Recent studies have shown that the histone deacetylase-8 (HDAC8), as one of the HDACs, regulates the expression and activity of various genes involved in cancer initiation and progression. The HDAC8 plays an epigenetic role to dysregulate expressions or to interact with transcription factors. Most researchers had focused on the HDAC 1-3 and 6, but today the HDAC8 isotype is a promising target in cancer therapy. Different studies, on breast cancer (BC) cells, have recently shown the HDAC8 overexpression and suggested its oncogenic potential. It seems that the HDAC8 could be a novel and promising target in breast cancer treatment. Some studies on BC demonstrated therapeutic properties of the inhibitors of HDAC8 such as suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), Trichostatin A, valproic acid, sodium butyrate, 1,3,4 oxadiazole with alanine hybrid [(R)-2-amino-N-((5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl) methyl) propanamide (10b)], N-(2-Hydroxyphenyl)-2propylpentanamide (compound 2) and PCI-34051. In this review, we highlight the role and existing inhibitors of HDAC8 in BC pathogenesis and therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prp.2021.153396DOI Listing
April 2021

Orbitofrontal-Striatal Structural Alterations Linked to Negative Symptoms at Different Stages of the Schizophrenia Spectrum.

Schizophr Bull 2021 04;47(3):849-863

Department of Psychiatry, Division of Adult Psychiatry, Geneva University Hospitals, Geneva, Switzerland.

Negative symptoms such as anhedonia and apathy are among the most debilitating manifestations of schizophrenia (SZ). Imaging studies have linked these symptoms to morphometric abnormalities in 2 brain regions implicated in reward and motivation: the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and striatum. Higher negative symptoms are generally associated with reduced OFC thickness, while higher apathy specifically maps to reduced striatal volume. However, it remains unclear whether these tissue losses are a consequence of chronic illness and its treatment or an underlying phenotypic trait. Here, we use multicentre magnetic resonance imaging data to investigate orbitofrontal-striatal abnormalities across the SZ spectrum from healthy populations with high schizotypy to unmedicated and medicated first-episode psychosis (FEP), and patients with chronic SZ. Putamen, caudate, accumbens volume, and OFC thickness were estimated from T1-weighted images acquired in all 3 diagnostic groups and controls from 4 sites (n = 337). Results were first established in 1 discovery dataset and replicated in 3 independent samples. There was a negative correlation between apathy and putamen/accumbens volume only in healthy individuals with schizotypy; however, medicated patients exhibited larger putamen volume, which appears to be a consequence of antipsychotic medications. The negative association between reduced OFC thickness and total negative symptoms also appeared to vary along the SZ spectrum, being significant only in FEP patients. In schizotypy, there was increased OFC thickness relative to controls. Our findings suggest that negative symptoms are associated with a temporal continuum of orbitofrontal-striatal abnormalities that may predate the occurrence of SZ. Thicker OFC in schizotypy may represent either compensatory or pathological mechanisms prior to the disease onset.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbaa169DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8084448PMC
April 2021

Sex effects on brain structure in de novo Parkinson's disease: a multimodal neuroimaging study.

Brain 2020 10;143(10):3052-3066

McConnell Brain Imaging Centre, Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.

Parkinson's disease varies in severity and age of onset. One source of this variability is sex. Males are twice as likely as females to develop Parkinson's disease, and tend to have more severe symptoms and greater speed of progression. However, to date, there is little information in large cohorts on sex differences in the patterns of neurodegeneration. Here we used MRI and clinical information from the Parkinson Progression Markers Initiative to measure structural brain differences between sexes in Parkinson's disease after regressing out the expected effect of age and sex. We derived atrophy maps from deformation-based morphometry of T1-weighted MRI and connectivity from diffusion-weighted MRI in de novo Parkinson's disease patients (149 males: 83 females) with comparable clinical severity, and healthy control participants (78 males: 39 females). Overall, even though the two patient groups were matched for disease duration and severity, males demonstrated generally greater brain atrophy and disrupted connectivity. Males with Parkinson's disease had significantly greater tissue loss than females in 11 cortical regions including bilateral frontal and left insular lobe, right postcentral gyrus, left inferior temporal and cingulate gyrus and left thalamus, while females had greater atrophy in six cortical regions, including regions in the left frontal lobe, right parietal lobe, left insular gyrus and right occipital cortex. Local efficiency of white matter connectivity showed greater disruption in males in multiple regions such as basal ganglia, hippocampus, amygdala and thalamus. These findings support the idea that development of Parkinson's disease may involve different pathological mechanisms and yield distinct prognosis in males and females, which may have implications for research into neuroprotection, and stratification for clinical trials.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/brain/awaa234DOI Listing
October 2020

White Matter Microstructural Properties Associated with Impaired Attention in Chronic Schizophrenia: A Multi-Center Study.

Psychiatry Res Neuroimaging 2020 08 23;302:111105. Epub 2020 May 23.

McConnell Brain Imaging Centre, Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.

Attention as a key cognitive function is impaired in schizophrenia, interfering with the normal daily life of the patients. Previous studies on the microstructural correlates of attention in schizophrenia were limited to single fibers, did not include a control group, or did not adjust for drug dosage. In the current study, we investigated the association between microstructural properties of the white matter fibers and attention tests in 81 patients and 79 healthy controls from the Mind Clinical Imaging Consortium database. Integrity measures of superior longitudinal fasciculus, cingulum, genu, and splenium were extracted after tractography. Using an interaction model between diagnosis and microstructural properties, and adjusting for age, gender, acquisition site, education, and cumulative drug usage dose, and after correcting for family-wise error, we showed decreased integrity in the patients and a significant negative association between fractional anisotropy of the tracts and trail making test part A with a greater expected decrease in the attention per unit of decrease of integrity in the patients compared to the healthy controls. Our findings suggest that decreased integrity of the bilateral cingulum, and splenium, are independent of the cumulative drug dosage, age, gender, and site, and may underlie the impaired attention in the schizophrenia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pscychresns.2020.111105DOI Listing
August 2020

Gray matter volume and estimated brain age gap are not linked with sleep-disordered breathing.

Hum Brain Mapp 2020 08 2;41(11):3034-3044. Epub 2020 Apr 2.

Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-1; INM-7), Research Center Jülich, Jülich, Germany.

Alzheimer's disease (AD) and sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) are prevalent conditions with a rising burden. It is suggested that SDB may contribute to cognitive decline and advanced aging. Here, we assessed the link between self-reported SDB and gray matter volume in patients with AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and healthy controls (HCs). We further investigated whether SDB was associated with advanced brain aging. We included a total of 330 participants, divided based on self-reported history of SDB, and matched across diagnoses for age, sex and presence of the Apolipoprotein E4 allele, from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Gray-matter volume was measured using voxel-wise morphometry and group differences in terms of SDB, cognitive status, and their interaction were assessed. Further, using an age-prediction model fitted on gray-matter data of external datasets, we predicted study participants' age from their structural images. Cognitive decline and advanced age were associated with lower gray matter volume in various regions, particularly in the bilateral temporal lobes. Brains age was well predicted from the morphological data in HCs and, as expected, elevated in MCI and particularly in AD subjects. However, there was neither a significant difference between regional gray matter volume in any diagnostic group related to the SDB status, nor in SDB-by-cognitive status interaction. Moreover, we found no difference in estimated chronological age gap related to SDB, or by-cognitive status interaction. Contrary to our hypothesis, we were not able to find a general or a diagnostic-dependent association of SDB with either gray-matter volumetric or brain aging.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.24995DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7336142PMC
August 2020

Genetic influence is linked to cortical morphology in category-selective areas of visual cortex.

Nat Commun 2020 02 5;11(1):709. Epub 2020 Feb 5.

MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.

Human visual cortex contains discrete areas that respond selectively to specific object categories such as faces, bodies, and places. A long-standing question is whether these areas are shaped by genetic or environmental factors. To address this question, here we analyzed functional MRI data from an unprecedented number (n = 424) of monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins. Category-selective maps were more identical in MZ than DZ twins. Within each category-selective area, distinct subregions showed significant genetic influence. Structural MRI analysis revealed that the 'genetic voxels' were predominantly located in regions with higher cortical curvature (gyral crowns in face areas and sulcal fundi in place areas). Moreover, we found that cortex was thicker and more myelinated in genetic voxels of face areas, while it was thinner and less myelinated in genetic voxels of place areas. This double dissociation suggests a differential development of face and place areas in cerebral cortex.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-14610-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7002610PMC
February 2020

Predicting severity and prognosis in Parkinson's disease from brain microstructure and connectivity.

Neuroimage Clin 2020 28;25:102111. Epub 2019 Nov 28.

McConnell Brain Imaging Centre, Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, 3801 University St., Montreal, Quebec H3A 2B4, Canada.

Objectives: Investigating biomarkers to demonstrate progression of Parkinson's disease (PD) is of high priority. We investigated the association of brain structural properties with progression of clinical outcomes and their ability to differentiate clinical subtypes of PD.

Methods: A comprehensive set of clinical features was evaluated at baseline and 4.5-year follow-up for 144 de-novo PD patients from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative. We created a global composite outcome (GCO) by combining z-scores of non-motor and motor symptoms, motor signs, overall activities of daily living and global cognition, as a single numeric indicator of prognosis. We classified patients into three subtypes based on multi-domain clinical criteria: 'mild motor-predominant', 'intermediate' and 'diffuse-malignant'. We analyzed diffusion-weighted scans at the early drug-naïve stage and extracted fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity (MD) of basal ganglia and cortical sub-regions. Then, we employed graph theory to calculate network properties and used network-based statistic to investigate our primary hypothesis.

Results: Baseline MD of globus pallidus was associated with worsening of motor severity, cognition, and GCO after 4.5 years of follow-up. Connectivity disruption at baseline was correlated with decline in cognition, and increase in GCO. Baseline MD of nucleus accumbens, globus pallidus and basal-ganglia were linked to clinical subtypes at 4.5-year of follow-up. Disruption in sub-cortical networks associated with being subtyped as 'diffuse-malignant' versus 'mild motor-predominant' after 4.5 years.

Conclusions: Diffusion imaging analysis at the early de-novo stage of PD was able to differentiate clinical sub-types of PD after 4.5 years and was highly associated with future clinical outcomes of PD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nicl.2019.102111DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6926369PMC
January 2021

Activation of ATP-sensitive K-channel promotes the anticonvulsant properties of cannabinoid receptor agonist through mitochondrial ATP level reduction.

Epilepsy Behav 2019 04 16;93:1-6. Epub 2019 Feb 16.

Brain and Spinal Cord Injury Research Center, Neuroscience Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Experimental Medicine Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

Cannabinoid receptor (CBR) agonist could act as a protective agent against seizure susceptibility in animal models of epilepsy. Studies have shown that potassium channels could play a key role in ameliorating neuronal excitability. In this study, we attempted to evaluate how CBRs and Adenosine Tri-Phosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium channels collaborate to affect seizure susceptibility by changing the clonic seizure threshold (CST). We used male Naval Medical Research Institute (NMRI) mice and treated them with the following drugs: cromakalim (a potassium channel opener, 10 μg/kg), glibenclamide (a potassium channel blocker, 0.03 and 1 mg/kg), 0.5 mg/kg of AM-251 (a selective CB1 antagonist), AM-630 (a selective CB2 antagonist), and 0.5, 3, and 10 mg/kg of WIN 55,212-2 (a nonselective agonist of CBRs); and CST was appraised after each type of administration. Also, we evaluated the ATP level of the hippocampus in each treatment to clarify the interaction between the cannabinoid system and potassium channel. Our results showed that administration of WIN 55,212-2 at 10 mg/kg significantly increased CST (P < 0.001). This change could be reversed by using AM-251(P < 0.001) but not AM-630. Also, either cromakalim (10 μg/kg) or glibenclamide (0.03 and 1 mg/kg) could not significantly affect the CST. In addition, glibenclamide (1 mg/kg) could reverse the anticonvulsant effect of WIN 55,212-2 (10 mg/kg) on CST (P < 0.001). However, the anticonvulsant effect was observed when cromakalim (10 μg/kg) was added to WIN 55,212-2 at its subeffective dose (3 mg/kg) in comparison to single-treated animals. Interestingly, we observed that CB1 agonist could significantly decrease ATP level. In conclusion, CB1 agonist accomplishes at least a part of its anticonvulsant actions through ATP-sensitive potassium channels, probably by decreasing the mitochondrial ATP level to open the potassium channel to induce its anticonvulsant effect.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yebeh.2019.01.025DOI Listing
April 2019

HLA-DRB1 polymorphism and susceptibility to multiple sclerosis in the Middle East North Africa region: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

J Neuroimmunol 2018 08 6;321:117-124. Epub 2018 Jun 6.

MS Research Centre, Neuroscience Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

This meta-analysis explores association of HLA-DRB1 alleles with MS risk in the Middle-east North Africa (MENA) countries. Divided into two groups of alleles (10 studies, 899 cases/1457 controls) and phenotypes (8 studies, 1,040 cases/1,256 controls), Odds ratios (ORs) of DRB1 distribution in MS subjects were assessed using Cochrane RevMan software. DRB1*15 demonstrated significant association with MS in both groups (OR=1.6 and OR=2.51, respectively). In phenotypes, DRB1*03 and DRB1*04 had predisposing role (OR=1.8 and OR=1.9), while DRB1*07 and DRB1*11 were protective (OR=0.56 and OR=0.67). Similar but non-significant trends were seen among alleles, which in sum coincides with a Caucasian-like pattern.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jneuroim.2018.06.005DOI Listing
August 2018

Relationship between cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers and structural brain network properties in Parkinson's disease.

Mov Disord 2018 03 13;33(3):431-439. Epub 2018 Feb 13.

McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.

Background: Pathological accumulation of α-synuclein, amyloid-β , and tau proteins in the brain is considered critical for development of various neurodegenerative diseases.

Objectives: We investigated the association between CSF levels of these biomarkers, brain structural connectivity, and the UPDRS in PD.

Methods: Diffusion tensor images and CSF biomarkers (α-synuclein, amyloid-β , total tau, and phosphorylated tau181) from 132 drug-naïve, nondemented PD patients and 61 healthy controls were obtained from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative database. After network reconstruction of structural connectivity patterns, global interconnectivity measures (including global efficiency, clustering coefficient, and characteristic path length) and local efficiency were calculated. Network properties and CSF biomarkers were compared between PD patients and healthy controls. The association of CSF biomarkers with network properties and UPDRS-III score was investigated.

Results: Global measures (but not local efficiency) and CSF α-synuclein were significantly lower in PD patients. Global efficiency and clustering coefficient correlated positively with α-synuclein, Aβ , and total tau CSF levels. Furthermore, these CSF biomarkers showed no significant association with the UPDRS-III score.

Conclusions: This study examined the association of CSF biomarkers that reflect the brain pathology, with structural brain connectivity and UPDRS-III in PD. Our results revealed an association between the abnormal aggregation of α-synuclein, Aβ , and tau proteins and structural connectivity disruption in PD patients. In summary, a combination of structural imaging and measurement of CSF biomarkers provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of PD. © 2018 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mds.27284DOI Listing
March 2018
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