Publications by authors named "Njål Lekven"

6 Publications

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Motor vehicle accidents-related maxillofacial injuries: a multicentre and prospective study.

Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol 2019 Sep 13;128(3):199-204. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Pathology, VU University Medical Center and Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Objectives: The purpose of this European multicenter prospective study was to obtain more precise information about the demographic characteristics and etiologic/epidemiologic patterns of motor vehicle accidents (MVA)-related maxillofacial fractures.

Study Design: Of the 3260 patients with maxillofacial fractures admitted within the study period, 326 traumas were caused by MVAs with a male/female ratio of 2.2:1.

Results: The maximum incidence was found in Zagreb (Croatia) (18%) and the minimum in Bergen (Norway) (0%). The most frequent mechanisms were car accidents, with 177 cases, followed by motorcycle accidents. The most frequently observed fracture involved the mandible, with 199 fractures, followed by maxillo-zygomatic-orbital (MZO) fractures.

Conclusions: In all the 3 groups (car, motorcycle, and pedestrian), mandibular and MZO fractures were the 2 most frequently observed fractures, with some variations. The importance of analyzing MVA-related facial injuries and their features and characteristics should be stressed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.oooo.2018.12.009DOI Listing
September 2019

European Maxillofacial Trauma (EURMAT) in children: a multicenter and prospective study.

Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol 2015 May 24;119(5):499-504. Epub 2014 Dec 24.

Department of Maxillofacial surgery, Stomatology Clinic, Tartu University, Tartu, Estonia.

Objective: The aim of this study is to present and discuss the results of a European multicentre prospective study about pediatric maxillofacial trauma epidemiology during a year.

Study Design: The following data were recorded: gender, age, etiology, site of fracture, date of injury. Of the 3396 patients with maxillofacial fractures admitted within the study period, 114 (3.3%) were children aged 15 years and younger, with a male/female ratio of 2.6:1. Mean age was 10.9 years. Most patients (63%) were aged 11-15 years.

Results: The most frequent cause of injury was fall (36 patients). Sport injuries and assaults were almost limited to the oldest group, whereas falls were more uniformly distributed in the 3 groups. The most frequently observed fracture involved the mandible with 47 fractures. In particular, 18 condylar fractures were recorded, followed by 12 body fractures.

Conclusions: Falls can be acknowledged as the most important cause of facial trauma during the first years of life. The high incidence of sport accidents after 10 years may be a reason to increase the use of mouthguards and other protective equipment. Finally, the mandible (and in particular the condyle) was confirmed as the most frequent fracture site.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.oooo.2014.12.012DOI Listing
May 2015

Assault-related maxillofacial injuries: the results from the European Maxillofacial Trauma (EURMAT) multicenter and prospective collaboration.

Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol 2015 Apr 11;119(4):385-91. Epub 2014 Dec 11.

Department of Maxillofacial surgery, Stomatology Clinic, Tartu University, Tartu, Estonia.

Objective: The aim of this study is to present and discuss the demographic characteristics and patterns of assault-related maxillofacial fractures as reported by a European multicenter prospective study.

Study Design: Demographic and injury data were recorded for each patient who was a victim of an assault.

Results: Assaults represented the most frequent etiology of maxillofacial trauma with an overall rate of 39% and the values ranging between 60.8% (Kiev, Ukraine) and 15.4% (Bergen, Norway). The most frequent mechanisms of assault-related maxillofacial fractures were fists in 730 cases, followed by kicks and fists. The most frequently observed fracture involved the mandible (814 fractures), followed by orbito-zygomatic-maxillary complex fractures and orbital fractures.

Conclusions: Our data confirmed the strong possibility that patients with maxillofacial fractures may be victims of physical aggression. The crucial role of alcohol in assault-related fractures was also confirmed by our study.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.oooo.2014.12.004DOI Listing
April 2015

European Maxillofacial Trauma (EURMAT) project: a multicentre and prospective study.

J Craniomaxillofac Surg 2015 Jan 22;43(1):62-70. Epub 2014 Oct 22.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Pathology, VU University Medical Center and Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

The purpose of this study was to analyse the demographics, causes and characteristics of maxillofacial fractures managed at several European departments of oral and maxillofacial surgery over one year. The following data were recorded: gender, age, aetiology, site of facial fractures, facial injury severity score, timing of intervention, length of hospital stay. Data for a total of 3396 patients (2655 males and 741 females) with 4155 fractures were recorded. The mean age differed from country to country, ranging between 29.9 and 43.9 years. Overall, the most frequent cause of injury was assault, which accounted for the injuries of 1309 patients; assaults and falls alternated as the most important aetiological factor in the various centres. The most frequently observed fracture involved the mandible with 1743 fractures, followed by orbital-zygomatic-maxillary (OZM) fractures. Condylar fractures were the most commonly observed mandibular fracture. The results of the EURMAT collaboration confirm the changing trend in maxillofacial trauma epidemiology in Europe, with trauma cases caused by assaults and falls now outnumbering those due to road traffic accidents. The progressive ageing of the European population, in addition to strict road and work legislation may have been responsible for this change. Men are still the most frequent victims of maxillofacial injuries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcms.2014.10.011DOI Listing
January 2015

Long-term follow-up of mandibular condylar fractures in children.

J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2011 Nov 15;69(11):2853-9. Epub 2011 Jun 15.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Head and Neck Division, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.

Purpose: The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the long-term clinical and radiographic outcomes of nonsurgically treated mandibular condylar fractures in children.

Materials And Methods: This study includes 42 children (23 girls and 19 boys) with 54 mandibular condylar fractures. All patients were younger than 18 years at the time of injury and were followed for at least 2 years (mean follow-up 4 years). Treatment was either observation or intermaxillary fixation (rigid and/or guiding elastics). Clinical outcome was categorized as favorable or unfavorable. Condylar remodeling was defined as complete, moderate, or poor on the basis of radiographic findings.

Results: Thirty-one patients (74%) presented with favorable and 11 (26%) with unfavorable clinical long-term outcome. Unilateral fractures showed a statistically significant increase of unfavorable clinical outcomes compared with bilateral fractures (P = .018). The radiologic examinations showed complete remodeling in 47 (87%), moderate remodeling in 5 (9%), and poor remodeling in 2 (4%) of the condylar fractures. One patient developed condylar overgrowth. No statistically significant relationship between clinical and radiologic outcome was found. Thirty-five patients (83%) had no subjective symptoms, and 41 (98%) described normal chewing function at the last follow-up examination.

Conclusions: Nonsurgical treatment of mandibular condylar fractures leads to acceptable remodeling of the condylar process, good clinical long-term outcome, and minimal subjective symptoms in most children. Unilateral fractures significantly increase the risk for unfavorable clinical outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joms.2011.03.019DOI Listing
November 2011

Temporal abscess after tooth extractions.

BMJ Case Rep 2010 Jul 21;2010. Epub 2010 Jul 21.

Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bcr.01.2010.2656DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3029959PMC
July 2010