Publications by authors named "Nina Predrijevac"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Structural changes in brains of patients with disorders of consciousness treated with deep brain stimulation.

Sci Rep 2021 Feb 23;11(1):4401. Epub 2021 Feb 23.

Department of Neurosurgery, Dubrava University Hospital, Avenija Gojka Suska 6, 10000, Zagreb, Croatia.

Disorders of consciousness (DOC) are one of the major consequences after anoxic or traumatic brain injury. So far, several studies have described the regaining of consciousness in DOC patients using deep brain stimulation (DBS). However, these studies often lack detailed data on the structural and functional cerebral changes after such treatment. The aim of this study was to conduct a volumetric analysis of specific cortical and subcortical structures to determine the impact of DBS after functional recovery of DOC patients. Five DOC patients underwent unilateral DBS electrode implantation into the centromedian parafascicular complex of the thalamic intralaminar nuclei. Consciousness recovery was confirmed using the Rappaport Disability Rating and the Coma/Near Coma scale. Brain MRI volumetric measurements were done prior to the procedure, then approximately a year after, and finally 7 years after the implementation of the electrode. The volumetric analysis included changes in regional cortical volumes and thickness, as well as in subcortical structures. Limbic cortices (parahippocampal and cingulate gyrus) and paralimbic cortices (insula) regions showed a significant volume increase and presented a trend of regional cortical thickness increase 1 and 7 years after DBS. The volumes of related subcortical structures, namely the caudate, the hippocampus as well as the amygdala, were significantly increased 1 and 7 years after DBS, while the putamen and nucleus accumbens presented with volume increase. Volume increase after DBS could be a result of direct DBS effects, or a result of functional recovery. Our findings are in accordance with the results of very few human studies connecting DBS and brain volume increase. Which mechanisms are behind the observed brain changes and whether structural changes are caused by consciousness recovery or DBS in patients with DOC is still a matter of debate.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-83873-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7902623PMC
February 2021

Hemoglobin A1c in Patients with Glioblastoma-A Preliminary Study.

World Neurosurg 2020 09 31;141:e553-e558. Epub 2020 May 31.

Department of Neurosurgery, Clinical Hospital Dubrava, Zagreb, Croatia; Department of Surgery, Zagreb University School of Medicine, Zagreb, Croatia.

Background: Glioblastomas are among the most common primary brain tumors with an abysmal prognosis. The significance of glucose metabolism in glioblastoma cell metabolism and proliferation is well-known. However, a significant correlation between the systemic metabolic status of the patient and the cellular proliferation of the glioblastoma has not yet been established.

Methods: Our aim was to observe and analyze for a possible correlation between glioblastoma cellular proliferation and patients' glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels as a marker of chronic systemic glycemia. We analyzed the data from 25 patients and compared their Ki-67 values with their preoperative HbA1c values.

Results: We observed a statistically significant correlation (P < 0.03) between chronic glycemia (measured using HbA1c) and the cellular proliferation of glioblastoma (measured by cellular Ki-67 expression).

Conclusions: These results imply a possible positive correlation between glioblastoma cell proliferation and chronic systemic glycemia, a correlation that, to the best of our knowledge, has not yet been reported. Further research in this area could not only lead to a better understanding of glioblastoma but also have significant clinical applications in treating this devastating disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2020.05.231DOI Listing
September 2020

HbA1c in patients with intracranial meningiomas WHO grades I and II: A preliminary study.

IUBMB Life 2020 07 5;72(7):1426-1432. Epub 2020 Mar 5.

Department of Neurosurgery, Clinical Hospital Dubrava, Zagreb, Croatia.

Meningiomas are among the most common primary brain tumors. There is a growing need for novel ways of differentiating between benign (World Health Organization [WHO] grade I) and atypical (WHO grade II) meningiomas as well as for novel markers of the tumor's future behavior. A difference between glucose metabolism in atypical and benign meningiomas is well known. However, a significant correlation between the systemic metabolic status of the patient and the meningioma WHO grade has not yet been established. Our aim was to compare the WHO grades of intracranial meningiomas with the patient's HbA1c levels as a more reliable marker of the chronic systemic metabolic status than the fasting blood glucose value, which is usually looked at. We retrospectively analyzed 15 patients and compared their meningioma WHO grade with their preoperative HbA1c values. Our results show that patients with benign intracranial meningiomas have significantly lower HbA1c value. Conversely, patients with atypical intracranial meningiomas have higher HbA1c values. Furthermore, we showed that the proliferation factor Ki67 was statistically strongly correlated with the HbA1c value (p < .001. These results imply a possible positive correlation between meningioma cell proliferation and the chronic systemic glycemia. Further research in this area could not only lead to better understanding of meningiomas but could have significant clinical application.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/iub.2268DOI Listing
July 2020