Niloofar Taghizadeh - University of Calgary

Niloofar Taghizadeh

University of Calgary

Niloofar Taghizadeh - University of Calgary

Niloofar Taghizadeh

Introduction

Primary Affiliation: University of Calgary

Publications

14Publications

347Reads

198Profile Views

34PubMed Central Citations

Healthcare Costs and Utilization among Patients Hospitalized for Malignant Pleural Effusion.

Respiration 2020 10;99(3):257-263. Epub 2020 Mar 10.

Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000506210DOI Listing
March 2020
2.593 Impact Factor

A Randomized Controlled Study of Integrated Smoking Cessation in a Lung Cancer Screening Program.

J Thorac Oncol 2019 Sep 8;14(9):1528-1537. Epub 2019 May 8.

Department of Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtho.2019.04.024DOI Listing
September 2019
3 Reads
5.282 Impact Factor

Procedures Performed during Hospitalizations for Malignant Pleural Effusions: Data from the 2012 National Inpatient Sample.

Respiration 2018;95(4):228-234. Epub 2018 Feb 7.

Division of Respiratory Medicine, Foothills Medical Center, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000485934DOI Listing
October 2018
15 Reads
2.593 Impact Factor

Radiologist initiated specialty referral for patients suspected of having a thoracic malignancy

Canadian Journal of Respiratory, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine Vol. 1, Iss. 4, 2017

Canadian Journal of Respiratory, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine

RATIONALE: The time interval between detection of a lesion suspicious for thoracic malignancy on imaging and referral to specialty care can be too long. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to evaluate an expedited referral process in which a radiologist could trigger a referral to specialty care at the time of CT interpretation. METHODS: Prospective observational non-randomized study of two groups of patients referred to the Alberta Thoracic Oncology Program-South (ATOP-S). Group 1: Subjects referred through a radiologist referral at the time of interpretation. Group 2: Subjects referred through another health care provider. The time interval between dates of first suspicious CT scan to acceptance of referral (CT-R), first specialty appointment date (CT-A), and treatment decision (CT-D) were compared between both groups. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Seventy-five cases met study criteria for group 1 and 836 for group 2. The median (75th, 90th percentile) CT-R was 4 (8, 13) days in group 1 and 8 (19, 37) days in group 2. For CT-A, the time intervals were 14 (19, 26) days in group 1 and 20 (32, 52) days in group 2 and for CT-D 26 (40, 63) days in group 1 and 32 (49, 71) days in group 2. Subjects in group 1 had a significantly shorter CT-R, CT-A, and CT-D intervals compared to subjects in group 2 (P-values < 0.001, < 0.001 and 0.004, respectively). CONCLUSION: A radiologist initiated referral program significantly reduced the interval between first CT scan suggestive of a lung malignancy to receipt of referral to a specialist, first specialty appointment date and treatment decision.

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October 2017
8 Reads

Tobacco use and motivation to stop smoking among long-term smokers who are ineligible for lung cancer screening.

Lung Cancer 2017 09 19;111:101-107. Epub 2017 Jul 19.

Division of Respiratory Medicine and Charbonneau Cancer Research Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lungcan.2017.07.017DOI Listing
September 2017
73 Reads
1 Citation
3.960 Impact Factor

USA Hospitalizations for Malignant Pleural Effusions - Data from the 2012 National Inpatient Sample.

Chest. 2016 Nov 19. pii: S0012-3692(16)62357-7.

Chest

Abstract BACKGROUND: Malignant pleural effusions (MPE) are a common complication of advanced malignancy, but little is known regarding their prevalence and overall burden on a population level. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis of MPE associated hospitalizations using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project-Nationwide Inpatient Sample, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (HCUP-NIS 2012). Cases were included if MPE was coded as a primary or secondary diagnosis or if an unspecified pleural effusion was coded in addition to a diagnosis of cancer with either of these being the primary diagnosis. RESULTS: A weighted sample of 126,825 (0.35 %) admissions for MPE was identified among the 36,484,846 weighted admissions included in the database in 2012. Of these admissions, 70,750 (55.8 %) were for female patients. The median (interquartile range (IQR)) age at admission was 68.0 (58.4-77.2). Lung (37.8%), breast (15.2%), hematologic (11.2%), GI tract (11.0%), and gynecologic (9.0%) cancers were the most common primary malignancies associated with MPE. The median (IQR) length of stay was 5.5 (2.7-10.1) days and the inpatient mortality rate was 11.6%. Median (IQR) hospitalization total charges were $42,376 (21,618-84,679). In the multivariate analyses, female gender, large fringe counties residential area, Medicare insurance and Elective type of admission were independently associated with a lower risk of inpatient mortality. CONCLUSIONS: There is a considerable inpatient burden and high inpatient mortality associated with MPE in the United States with potential demographic, geographic and socioeconomic disparities.

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November 2016
12 Reads

Lesion heterogeneity and risk of infectious complications following peripheral endobronchial ultrasound.

Respirology. 2016 Nov 18. doi: 10.1111/resp.12942.

Respirology.

Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The reported incidence of peripheral endobronchial ultrasound (pEBUS)-related infectious complications is below 1%, although studies have never focused solely on them or reported their risk factors. The goal of this study is to describe our local pEBUS infectious complication rate and characterize patient, lesion and procedural factors associated with infectious complications. METHODS: All charts, computed tomography scans and electronic records of patients who underwent a pEBUS at the Foothills Medical Center and South Health Campus Hospital in Calgary between 1 May 2014 and 1 October 2015 were reviewed. RESULTS: One hundred and ninety-nine pEBUS procedures were included in our study. The local infectious complication rate was 4.0% (8/199). Two lesion characteristics were more frequent in patients who suffered infectious complications: larger lesion diameter (P = 0.016) and lesion heterogeneity on imaging suggestive of areas of necrosis (P < 0.001). In a multivariate analysis, only the presence of lesion heterogeneity was significantly associated with infectious complications (OR = 16.74 (2.95-95.08)). The rate of infectious complications in lesions with a heterogeneous appearance was 20.7% (6/29). CONCLUSION: The rate of infectious complications after pEBUS is elevated when biopsying heterogeneous appearing lesions. This may not have previously been reported as studies of pEBUS focused on smaller and probably rarely necrotic lesions. Future studies of methods to prevent infections complications in pEBUS-guided biopsies of heterogeneous appearing lesions are warranted.

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November 2016
10 Reads

Lifetime Smoking History and Cause-Specific Mortality in a Cohort Study with 43 Years of Follow-Up.

PLoS One 2016 7;11(4):e0153310. Epub 2016 Apr 7.

Department of Epidemiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands.

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0153310PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4824471PMC
September 2016
29 Reads
8 Citations
3.234 Impact Factor

BMI and lifetime changes in BMI and cancer mortality risk.

PLoS One 2015 16;10(4):e0125261. Epub 2015 Apr 16.

University of Groningen, University Medical Centre Groningen, Department of Epidemiology, Groningen, the Netherlands.

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0125261PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4399977PMC
April 2016
26 Reads
7 Citations
3.234 Impact Factor

Objective allergy markers and risk of cancer mortality and hospitalization in a large population-based cohort.

Cancer Causes Control 2015 Jan 12;26(1):99-109. Epub 2014 Nov 12.

Department of Epidemiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10552-014-0489-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4282688PMC
January 2015
43 Reads
4 Citations
2.735 Impact Factor

Serum uric acid levels and cancer mortality risk among males in a large general population-based cohort study.

Cancer Causes Control 2014 Aug 7;25(8):1075-80. Epub 2014 Jun 7.

Department of Epidemiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, FA40, E3-29, Hanzeplein 1, 9700 RB, Groningen, The Netherlands.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10552-014-0408-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4082647PMC
August 2014
12 Reads
9 Citations
2.735 Impact Factor

Top co-authors

Alain Tremblay
Alain Tremblay

University of Calgary

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Stephen C Lam
Stephen C Lam

University of British Columbia

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Paul MacEachern
Paul MacEachern

University of Calgary

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Judith M Vonk
Judith M Vonk

University of Groningen

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Rommy Koetzler
Rommy Koetzler

University of Calgary

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Huiming Yang
Huiming Yang

Sichuan University

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Paul Burrowes
Paul Burrowes

University of Calgary

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James A Dickinson
James A Dickinson

University of Calgary

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Martin C Tammemagi
Martin C Tammemagi

Brock University

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Martin Tammemagi

University of California

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