Publications by authors named "Niles Nelson"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) in leukaemic phase without skin lesions: a diagnostic and management challenge.

Pathology 2019 Jun 16;51(4):439-441. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

Department Haematology, Royal Hobart Hospital, Hobart, Tas, Australia.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pathol.2018.11.016DOI Listing
June 2019

A multicenter retrospective comparison of induction chemoimmunotherapy regimens on outcomes in transplant-eligible patients with previously untreated mantle cell lymphoma.

Hematol Oncol 2019 Aug 24;37(3):253-260. Epub 2019 May 24.

Department of Haematology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia.

Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an uncommon and typically aggressive form of lymphoma. Although often initially chemosensitive, relapse is common. Several induction and conditioning regimens are used in transplant-eligible patients, and the optimal approach remains unknown. We performed an international, retrospective study of transplant-eligible patients to assess impact of induction chemoimmunotherapy and conditioning regimens on clinical outcomes. We identified 228 patients meeting inclusion criteria. Baseline characteristics were similar among the induction groups except for some variation in age. The type of induction chemoimmunotherapy received did not influence overall response rates (ORRs) (0.43), progression-free survival (PFS) (P > .67), or overall survival (OS) (P > .35) on multivariate analysis (PFS and OS). Delivery of autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) was associated with favorable PFS and OS (0.01) on univariate analysis only; this benefit was not seen on multivariate analysis-PFS (0.36) and OS (0.21). Compared with busulfan and melphalan (BuMel), the use of the carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, melphalan (BEAM)-conditioning regimen was associated with inferior PFS (HR = 2.0 [95% CI 1.1-3.6], 0.02) but not OS (HR = 1.1 [95% CI 0.5-2.3], 0.81) on univariate analysis only. Within the limits of a retrospective study and modest power for some comparisons, type of induction therapy did not influence ORR, PFS, or OS for transplant-eligible patients with MCL. International efforts are required to perform randomized clinical trials evaluating chemoimmunotherapy induction regimens.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hon.2618DOI Listing
August 2019

Deafness alters auditory nerve fibre responses to cochlear implant stimulation.

Eur J Neurosci 2007 Jul;26(2):510-22

The Bionic Ear Institute, Melbourne, Victoria 3002, Australia.

Here we characterized the relationship between duration of sensorineural hearing loss and the response of the auditory nerve to electrical stimulus rate. Electrophysiological recordings were made from undeafened guinea pigs and those ototoxically deafened for either 5 weeks or 6 months. Auditory neuron survival decreased significantly with the duration of deafness. Extracellular recordings were made from auditory nerve fibres responding to biphasic, charge-balanced current pulses delivered at rates of 20 and 200 pulses/s via a monopolar scala tympani stimulating electrode. The response to 20 pulses/s electrical stimulation of the deafened cochlea exhibited a decrease in spike latency, unaltered temporal jitter and unaltered dynamic range (of nerve firing rate against stimulus current), and a reduction in threshold after 6 months of deafness. The response to a 200-pulse/s stimulus was similar except that the dynamic range was greater than with 20 pulses/s and was also greater in deafened animals than in undeafened animals. Deafness and pulse rate are related; in deaf animals spike recovery appears to be complete between successive stimulus pulses at a low rate (20 pulses/s), but incomplete between pulses at a moderate pulse rate (200 pulses/s). These results suggest that changes in the function of individual auditory nerve fibres after deafness may affect clinical responses during high-rate stimulation such as that used in contemporary speech processing strategies, but not during lower rate stimulation such as that used to record evoked potentials.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1460-9568.2007.05678.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2112941PMC
July 2007