Publications by authors named "Nikos Papadimitriou"

24 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

An umbrella review of the evidence associating diet and cancer risk at 11 anatomical sites.

Nat Commun 2021 07 28;12(1):4579. Epub 2021 Jul 28.

Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Ioannina School of Medicine, Ioannina, Greece.

There is evidence that diet and nutrition are modifiable risk factors for several cancers, but associations may be flawed due to inherent biases. Nutritional epidemiology studies have largely relied on a single assessment of diet using food frequency questionnaires. We conduct an umbrella review of meta-analyses of observational studies to evaluate the strength and validity of the evidence for the association between food/nutrient intake and risk of developing or dying from 11 primary cancers. It is estimated that only few single food/nutrient and cancer associations are supported by strong or highly suggestive meta-analytic evidence, and future similar research is unlikely to change this evidence. Alcohol consumption is positively associated with risk of postmenopausal breast, colorectal, esophageal, head & neck and liver cancer. Consumption of dairy products, milk, calcium and wholegrains are inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk. Coffee consumption is inversely associated with risk of liver cancer and skin basal cell carcinoma.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-24861-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8319326PMC
July 2021

Circulating tryptophan metabolites and risk of colon cancer: Results from case-control and prospective cohort studies.

Int J Cancer 2021 Nov 12;149(9):1659-1669. Epub 2021 Jul 12.

International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.

Dysregulation of tryptophan metabolism has been linked to colorectal tumorigenesis; however, epidemiological studies investigating tryptophan metabolites in relation to colorectal cancer risk are limited. We studied associations of plasma tryptophan, serotonin and kynurenine with colon cancer risk in two studies with cancer patients and controls, and in one prospective cohort: ColoCare Study (110 patients/153 controls), the Colorectal Cancer Study of Austria (CORSA; 46 patients/390 controls) and the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC; 456 matched case-control pairs). Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for colon cancer risk. Tryptophan was inversely associated with colon cancer risk in ColoCare (OR per 1-SD = 0.44; 95% CI, 0.31-0.64) and EPIC (OR per 1-SD = 0.86; 95% CI, 0.74-0.99). Comparing detectable vs nondetectable levels, serotonin was positively associated with colon cancer in CORSA (OR = 6.39; 95% CI, 3.61-11.3) and EPIC (OR = 2.03; 95% CI, 1.20-3.40). Kynurenine was inversely associated with colon cancer in ColoCare (OR per 1-SD = 0.74; 95% CI, 0.55-0.98), positively associated in CORSA (OR per 1-SD = 1.79; 95% CI, 1.27-2.52), while no association was observed in EPIC. The kynurenine-to-tryptophan ratio was positively associated with colon cancer in ColoCare (OR per 1-SD = 1.38; 95% CI, 1.03-1.84) and CORSA (OR per 1-SD = 1.44; 95% CI, 1.06-1.96), but not in EPIC. These results suggest that higher plasma tryptophan may be associated with lower colon cancer risk, while increased serotonin may be associated with a higher risk of colon cancer. The kynurenine-to-tryptophan ratio may also reflect altered tryptophan catabolism during colon cancer development.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.33725DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8429124PMC
November 2021

Dietary Methyl-Group Donor Intake and Breast Cancer Risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).

Nutrients 2021 May 28;13(6). Epub 2021 May 28.

Office of the Director, International Agency for Research on Cancer, CEDEX 08, 69372 Lyon, France.

(1) Background: Methyl-group donors (MGDs), including folate, choline, betaine, and methionine, may influence breast cancer (BC) risk through their role in one-carbon metabolism; (2) Methods: We studied the relationship between dietary intakes of MGDs and BC risk, adopting data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort; (3) Results: 318,686 pre- and postmenopausal women were followed between enrolment in 1992-2000 and December 2013-December 2015. Dietary MGD intakes were estimated at baseline through food-frequency questionnaires. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to quantify the association between dietary intake of MGDs, measured both as a calculated score based on their sum and individually, and BC risk. Subgroup analyses were performed by hormone receptor status, menopausal status, and level of alcohol intake. During a mean follow-up time of 14.1 years, 13,320 women with malignant BC were identified. No associations were found between dietary intakes of the MGD score or individual MGDs and BC risk. However, a potential U-shaped relationship was observed between dietary folate intake and overall BC risk, suggesting an inverse association for intakes up to 350 µg/day compared to a reference intake of 205 µg/day. No statistically significant differences in the associations were observed by hormone receptor status, menopausal status, or level of alcohol intake; (4) Conclusions: There was no strong evidence for an association between MGDs involved in one-carbon metabolism and BC risk. However, a potential U-shaped trend was suggested for dietary folate intake and BC risk. Further research is needed to clarify this association.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu13061843DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8228096PMC
May 2021

A Prospective Diet-Wide Association Study for Risk of Colorectal Cancer in EPIC.

Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 2021 Apr 24. Epub 2021 Apr 24.

Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.

Background & Aims: Evidence regarding the association of dietary exposures with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk is not consistent with a few exceptions. Therefore, we conducted a diet-wide association study (DWAS) in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) to evaluate the associations between several dietary exposures with CRC risk.

Methods: The association of 92 food and nutrient intakes with CRC risk was assessed in 386,792 participants, 5069 of whom developed incident CRC. Correction for multiple comparisons was performed using the false discovery rate, and emerging associations were examined in the Netherlands Cohort Study (NLCS). Multiplicative gene-nutrient interactions were also tested in EPIC based on known CRC-associated loci.

Results: In EPIC, alcohol, liquor/spirits, wine, beer/cider, soft drinks, and pork were positively associated with CRC, whereas milk, cheese, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, riboflavin, vitamin B6, beta carotene, fruit, fiber, nonwhite bread, banana, and total protein intakes were inversely associated. Of these 20 associations, 13 were replicated in the NLCS, for which a meta-analysis was performed, namely alcohol (summary hazard ratio [HR] per 1-SD increment in intake: 1.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-1.09), liquor/spirits (HR per 1-SD increment in intake, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.02-1.06), wine (HR per 1-SD increment in intake, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.02-1.07), beer/cider (HR per 1-SD increment in intake, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.04-1.08), milk (HR per 1-SD increment in intake, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.93-0.98), cheese (HR per 1-SD increment in intake, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.94-0.99), calcium (HR per 1-SD increment in intake, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.90-0.95), phosphorus (HR per 1-SD increment in intake, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.90-0.95), magnesium (HR per 1-SD increment in intake, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92-0.98), potassium (HR per 1-SD increment in intake, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.94-0.99), riboflavin (HR per 1-SD increment in intake, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.92-0.97), beta carotene (HR per 1-SD increment in intake, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.93-0.98), and total protein (HR per 1-SD increment in intake, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.92-0.97). None of the gene-nutrient interactions were significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons.

Conclusions: Our findings confirm a positive association for alcohol and an inverse association for dairy products and calcium with CRC risk, and also suggest a lower risk at higher dietary intakes of phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, riboflavin, beta carotene, and total protein.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cgh.2021.04.028DOI Listing
April 2021

Circulating Levels of Testosterone, Sex Hormone Binding Globulin and Colorectal Cancer Risk: Observational and Mendelian Randomization Analyses.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2021 Jul 20;30(7):1336-1348. Epub 2021 Apr 20.

Section of Nutrition and Metabolism, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.

Background: Epidemiologic studies evaluating associations between sex steroid hormones and colorectal cancer risk have yielded inconsistent results. To elucidate the role of circulating levels of testosterone, and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) in colorectal cancer risk, we conducted observational and Mendelian randomization (MR) analyses.

Methods: The observational analyses included 333,530 participants enrolled in the UK Biobank with testosterone and SHBG measured. HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using multivariable Cox proportional hazards models. For MR analyses, genetic variants robustly associated with hormone levels were identified and their association with colorectal cancer (42,866 cases/42,752 controls) was examined using two-sample MR.

Results: In the observational analysis, there was little evidence that circulating levels of total testosterone were associated with colorectal cancer risk; the MR analyses showed a greater risk for women (OR per 1-SD = 1.09; 95% CI, 1.01-1.17), although pleiotropy may have biased this result. Higher SHBG concentrations were associated with greater colorectal cancer risk for women (HR per 1-SD = 1.16; 95% CI, 1.05-1.29), but was unsupported by the MR analysis. There was little evidence of associations between free testosterone and colorectal cancer in observational and MR analyses.

Conclusions: Circulating concentrations of sex hormones are unlikely to be causally associated with colorectal cancer. Additional experimental studies are required to better understand the possible role of androgens in colorectal cancer development.

Impact: Our results from large-scale analyses provide little evidence for sex hormone pathways playing a causal role in colorectal cancer development..
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-20-1690DOI Listing
July 2021

Genetically predicted circulating concentrations of micronutrients and risk of colorectal cancer among individuals of European descent: a Mendelian randomization study.

Am J Clin Nutr 2021 06;113(6):1490-1502

Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.

Background: The literature on associations of circulating concentrations of minerals and vitamins with risk of colorectal cancer is limited and inconsistent. Evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to support the efficacy of dietary modification or nutrient supplementation for colorectal cancer prevention is also limited.

Objectives: To complement observational and RCT findings, we investigated associations of genetically predicted concentrations of 11 micronutrients (β-carotene, calcium, copper, folate, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, selenium, vitamin B-6, vitamin B-12, and zinc) with colorectal cancer risk using Mendelian randomization (MR).

Methods: Two-sample MR was conducted using 58,221 individuals with colorectal cancer and 67,694 controls from the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium, Colorectal Cancer Transdisciplinary Study, and Colon Cancer Family Registry. Inverse variance-weighted MR analyses were performed with sensitivity analyses to assess the impact of potential violations of MR assumptions.

Results: Nominally significant associations were noted for genetically predicted iron concentration and higher risk of colon cancer [ORs per SD (ORSD): 1.08; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.17; P value = 0.05] and similarly for proximal colon cancer, and for vitamin B-12 concentration and higher risk of colorectal cancer (ORSD: 1.12; 95% CI: 1.03, 1.21; P value = 0.01) and similarly for colon cancer. A nominally significant association was also noted for genetically predicted selenium concentration and lower risk of colon cancer (ORSD: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.96, 1.00; P value = 0.05) and similarly for distal colon cancer. These associations were robust to sensitivity analyses. Nominally significant inverse associations were observed for zinc and risk of colorectal and distal colon cancers, but sensitivity analyses could not be performed. None of these findings survived correction for multiple testing. Genetically predicted concentrations of β-carotene, calcium, copper, folate, magnesium, phosphorus, and vitamin B-6 were not associated with disease risk.

Conclusions: These results suggest possible causal associations of circulating iron and vitamin B-12 (positively) and selenium (inversely) with risk of colon cancer.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/nqab003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8168352PMC
June 2021

Type 2 Diabetes and Cancer: An Umbrella Review of Observational and Mendelian Randomization Studies.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2021 06 18;30(6):1218-1228. Epub 2021 Mar 18.

Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Ioannina School of Medicine, Ioannina, Greece.

Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has been associated with an increased risk of developing several common cancers, but it is unclear whether this association is causal. We aimed to summarize the evidence on T2DM and cancer and evaluate the validity of associations from both observational and Mendelian randomization (MR) studies.

Methods: We performed an umbrella review of the evidence across meta-analyses of observational studies that examined associations of T2DM with risk of developing or dying from site-specific cancers, and MR studies that explored the potential causal association of T2DM and associated biomarkers with cancer risk.

Results: We identified eligible observational meta-analyses that assessed associations between T2DM and cancer incidence for 18 cancer sites, cancer mortality for seven sites, and cancer incidence or mortality for four sites. Positive associations between T2DM and six cancers reached strong or highly suggestive evidence. We found eight MR studies assessing the association of genetically predicted T2DM and seven and eight studies assessing the association of genetically predicted fasting insulin or fasting glucose concentrations, respectively, upon site-specific cancers. Positive associations were found between genetically predicted T2DM and fasting insulin and risk of six cancers. There was no association between genetically predicted fasting plasma glucose and cancer except for squamous cell lung carcinoma.

Conclusions: We found robust observational evidence for the association between T2DM and colorectal, hepatocellular, gallbladder, breast, endometrial, and pancreatic cancers.

Impact: Potential causal associations were identified for genetically predicted T2DM and fasting insulin concentrations and risk of endometrial, pancreas, kidney, breast, lung, and cervical cancers.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-20-1245DOI Listing
June 2021

Coffee consumption and risk of breast cancer: A Mendelian randomization study.

PLoS One 2021 19;16(1):e0236904. Epub 2021 Jan 19.

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.

Background: Observational studies have reported either null or weak protective associations for coffee consumption and risk of breast cancer.

Methods: We conducted a two-sample Mendelian randomization (MR) analysis to evaluate the relationship between coffee consumption and breast cancer risk using 33 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with coffee consumption from a genome-wide association (GWA) study on 212,119 female UK Biobank participants of White British ancestry. Risk estimates for breast cancer were retrieved from publicly available GWA summary statistics from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) on 122,977 cases (of which 69,501 were estrogen receptor (ER)-positive, 21,468 ER-negative) and 105,974 controls of European ancestry. Random-effects inverse variance weighted (IVW) MR analyses were performed along with several sensitivity analyses to assess the impact of potential MR assumption violations.

Results: One cup per day increase in genetically predicted coffee consumption in women was not associated with risk of total (IVW random-effects; odds ratio (OR): 0.91, 95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.80-1.02, P: 0.12, P for instrument heterogeneity: 7.17e-13), ER-positive (OR = 0.90, 95% CI: 0.79-1.02, P: 0.09) and ER-negative breast cancer (OR: 0.88, 95% CI: 0.75-1.03, P: 0.12). Null associations were also found in the sensitivity analyses using MR-Egger (total breast cancer; OR: 1.00, 95% CI: 0.80-1.25), weighted median (OR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.89-1.05) and weighted mode (OR: 1.00, CI: 0.93-1.07).

Conclusions: The results of this large MR study do not support an association of genetically predicted coffee consumption on breast cancer risk, but we cannot rule out existence of a weak association.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0236904PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7815134PMC
April 2021

Circulating adipokine concentrations and risk of five obesity-related cancers: A Mendelian randomization study.

Int J Cancer 2021 04 26;148(7):1625-1636. Epub 2020 Oct 26.

Section of Nutrition and Metabolism, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.

Obesity is considered a chronic inflammatory state characterized by continued secretion of adipokines and cytokines. Experimental and epidemiological evidence indicates that circulating adipokines may be associated with the development of obesity-related cancers, but it is unclear if these associations are causal or confounded. We examined potential causal associations of specific adipokines (adiponectin, leptin, soluble leptin receptor [sOB-R] and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 [PAI-1]) with five obesity-related cancers (colorectal, pancreatic, renal cell carcinoma [RCC], ovarian and endometrial) using Mendelian randomization (MR) methods. We used summary-level data from large genetic consortia for 114 530 cancer cases and 245 284 controls. We constructed genetic instruments using 18 genetic variants for adiponectin, 2 for leptin and 4 for both sOB-R and PAI-1 (P value for inclusion<5 × 10 ). Causal estimates were obtained using two-sample MR methods. In the inverse-variance weighted models, we found an inverse association between adiponectin and risk of colorectal cancer (odds ratio per 1 μg/mL increment in adiponectin concentration: 0.90 [95% confidence interval = 0.84-0.97]; P = .01); but, evidence of horizontal pleiotropy was detected and the association was not present when this was taken into consideration. No association was found for adiponectin and risks of pancreatic cancer, RCC, ovarian cancer and endometrial cancer. Leptin, sOB-R and PAI-1 were also similarly unrelated to risk of obesity-related cancers. Despite the large sample size, our MR analyses do not support causal effects of circulating adiponectin, leptin, sOB-R and PAI-1 concentrations on the development of five obesity-related cancers.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.33338DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7894468PMC
April 2021

Genetically predicted circulating concentrations of micronutrients and risk of breast cancer: A Mendelian randomization study.

Int J Cancer 2021 02 25;148(3):646-653. Epub 2020 Aug 25.

Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Ioannina School of Medicine, Ioannina, Greece.

The epidemiological literature reports inconsistent associations between consumption or circulating concentrations of micronutrients and breast cancer risk. We investigated associations between genetically predicted concentrations of 11 micronutrients (beta-carotene, calcium, copper, folate, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, selenium, vitamin B , vitamin B and zinc) and breast cancer risk using Mendelian randomization (MR). A two-sample MR study was conducted using 122 977 women with breast cancer and 105 974 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. MR analyses were conducted using the inverse variance-weighted approach, and sensitivity analyses were conducted to assess the impact of potential violations of MR assumptions. A value of 1 SD (SD: 0.08 mmol/L) higher genetically predicted concentration of magnesium was associated with a 17% (odds ratio [OR]: 1.17, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.10-1.25, P value = 9.1 × 10 ) and 20% (OR: 1.20, 95% CI: 1.08-1.34, P value = 3.2 × 10 ) higher risk of overall and ER breast cancer, respectively. An inverse association was observed for a SD (0.5 mg/dL) higher genetically predicted phosphorus concentration and ER breast cancer (OR: 0.84, 95% CI: 0.72-0.98, P value = .03). There was little evidence that any other nutrient was associated with breast cancer. The results for magnesium were robust under all sensitivity analyses and survived correction for multiple comparisons. Higher circulating concentrations of magnesium and potentially phosphorus may affect breast cancer risk. Further work is required to replicate these findings and investigate underlying mechanisms.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.33246DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8268064PMC
February 2021

Cigarette Smoking, Coffee Consumption, Alcohol Intake, and Risk of Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis: A Mendelian Randomization Study.

Inflamm Bowel Dis 2021 01;27(2):162-168

Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology Unit, Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, School of Medicine, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece.

Background: Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are widely associated with smoking in epidemiological studies, whereas there are conflicting results for the association between CD and UC for both coffee and alcohol consumption. Herein, we aimed to investigate whether cigarette smoking and alcohol and coffee consumption are causally associated with either CD or UC.

Methods: We utilized 540 genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms for 3 potentially addictive substances-nicotine, alcohol, and caffeine-to assess the association of smoking, coffee, and alcohol consumption with CD and UC (12,194 CD cases, 12,366 UC cases, and 25,042 controls of European ancestry), using Mendelian randomization analysis. Mendelian randomization estimates were used to evaluate the effect of the exposure factors on CD and UC risk. Sensitivity analysis was employed to test for any directional pleiotropy.

Results: We found evidence for a positive causal association between the age of smoking initiation and UC risk and between alcohol consumption and CD risk, which disappeared after sensitivity analysis for both associations (P > 0.05). No evidence for a causal association between cigarettes per day, smoking initiation, smoking cessation, and coffee consumption variables and UC or CD was found.

Conclusions: We found no clear evidence that either genetically predicted smoking, coffee consumption, or alcohol consumption are causally associated with the risk for CD or UC, although our findings indicate a potential positive association between the age of smoking and UC and between alcohol consumption and CD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ibd/izaa152DOI Listing
January 2021

Physical activity and risks of breast and colorectal cancer: a Mendelian randomisation analysis.

Nat Commun 2020 01 30;11(1):597. Epub 2020 Jan 30.

Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA.

Physical activity has been associated with lower risks of breast and colorectal cancer in epidemiological studies; however, it is unknown if these associations are causal or confounded. In two-sample Mendelian randomisation analyses, using summary genetic data from the UK Biobank and GWA consortia, we found that a one standard deviation increment in average acceleration was associated with lower risks of breast cancer (odds ratio [OR]: 0.51, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.27 to 0.98, P-value = 0.04) and colorectal cancer (OR: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.48 to 0.90, P-value = 0.01). We found similar magnitude inverse associations for estrogen positive (ER) breast cancer and for colon cancer. Our results support a potentially causal relationship between higher physical activity levels and lower risks of breast cancer and colorectal cancer. Based on these data, the promotion of physical activity is probably an effective strategy in the primary prevention of these commonly diagnosed cancers.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-14389-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6992637PMC
January 2020

Nutrient-wide association study of 92 foods and nutrients and breast cancer risk.

Breast Cancer Res 2020 01 13;22(1). Epub 2020 Jan 13.

Department of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.

Background: Several dietary factors have been reported to be associated with risk of breast cancer, but to date, unequivocal evidence only exists for alcohol consumption. We sought to systematically assess the association between intake of 92 foods and nutrients and breast cancer risk using a nutrient-wide association study.

Methods: Using data from 272,098 women participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study, we assessed dietary intake of 92 foods and nutrients estimated by dietary questionnaires. Cox regression was used to quantify the association between each food/nutrient and risk of breast cancer. A false discovery rate (FDR) of 0.05 was used to select the set of foods and nutrients to be replicated in the independent Netherlands Cohort Study (NLCS).

Results: Six foods and nutrients were identified as associated with risk of breast cancer in the EPIC study (10,979 cases). Higher intake of alcohol overall was associated with a higher risk of breast cancer (hazard ratio (HR) for a 1 SD increment in intake = 1.05, 95% CI 1.03-1.07), as was beer/cider intake and wine intake (HRs per 1 SD increment = 1.05, 95% CI 1.03-1.06 and 1.04, 95% CI 1.02-1.06, respectively), whereas higher intakes of fibre, apple/pear, and carbohydrates were associated with a lower risk of breast cancer (HRs per 1 SD increment = 0.96, 95% CI 0.94-0.98; 0.96, 95% CI 0.94-0.99; and 0.96, 95% CI 0.95-0.98, respectively). When evaluated in the NLCS (2368 cases), estimates for each of these foods and nutrients were similar in magnitude and direction, with the exception of beer/cider intake, which was not associated with risk in the NLCS.

Conclusions: Our findings confirm a positive association of alcohol consumption and suggest an inverse association of dietary fibre and possibly fruit intake with breast cancer risk.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13058-019-1244-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6958698PMC
January 2020

Circulating Levels of Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 and Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3 Associate With Risk of Colorectal Cancer Based on Serologic and Mendelian Randomization Analyses.

Gastroenterology 2020 04 27;158(5):1300-1312.e20. Epub 2019 Dec 27.

Department of Cancer Biology and Genetics and the Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.

Background & Aims: Human studies examining associations between circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3) and colorectal cancer risk have reported inconsistent results. We conducted complementary serologic and Mendelian randomization (MR) analyses to determine whether alterations in circulating levels of IGF1 or IGFBP3 are associated with colorectal cancer development.

Methods: Serum levels of IGF1 were measured in blood samples collected from 397,380 participants from the UK Biobank, from 2006 through 2010. Incident cancer cases and cancer cases recorded first in death certificates were identified through linkage to national cancer and death registries. Complete follow-up was available through March 31, 2016. For the MR analyses, we identified genetic variants associated with circulating levels of IGF1 and IGFBP3. The association of these genetic variants with colorectal cancer was examined with 2-sample MR methods using genome-wide association study consortia data (52,865 cases with colorectal cancer and 46,287 individuals without [controls]) RESULTS: After a median follow-up period of 7.1 years, 2665 cases of colorectal cancer were recorded. In a multivariable-adjusted model, circulating level of IGF1 associated with colorectal cancer risk (hazard ratio per 1 standard deviation increment of IGF1, 1.11; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-1.17). Similar associations were found by sex, follow-up time, and tumor subsite. In the MR analyses, a 1 standard deviation increment in IGF1 level, predicted based on genetic factors, was associated with a higher risk of colorectal cancer risk (odds ratio 1.08; 95% CI 1.03-1.12; P = 3.3 × 10). Level of IGFBP3, predicted based on genetic factors, was associated with colorectal cancer risk (odds ratio per 1 standard deviation increment, 1.12; 95% CI 1.06-1.18; P = 4.2 × 10). Colorectal cancer risk was associated with only 1 variant in the IGFBP3 gene region (rs11977526), which also associated with anthropometric traits and circulating level of IGF2.

Conclusions: In an analysis of blood samples from almost 400,000 participants in the UK Biobank, we found an association between circulating level of IGF1 and colorectal cancer. Using genetic data from 52,865 cases with colorectal cancer and 46,287 controls, a higher level of IGF1, determined by genetic factors, was associated with colorectal cancer. Further studies are needed to determine how this signaling pathway might contribute to colorectal carcinogenesis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2019.12.020DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7152801PMC
April 2020

A nutrient-wide association study for risk of prostate cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition and the Netherlands Cohort Study.

Eur J Nutr 2020 Oct 8;59(7):2929-2937. Epub 2019 Nov 8.

Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece.

Purpose: The evidence from the literature regarding the association of dietary factors and risk of prostate cancer is inconclusive.

Methods: A nutrient-wide association study was conducted to systematically and comprehensively evaluate the associations between 92 foods or nutrients and risk of prostate cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Cox proportional hazard regression models adjusted for total energy intake, smoking status, body mass index, physical activity, diabetes and education were used to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for standardized dietary intakes. As in genome-wide association studies, correction for multiple comparisons was applied using the false discovery rate (FDR < 5%) method and suggested results were replicated in an independent cohort, the Netherlands Cohort Study (NLCS).

Results: A total of 5916 and 3842 incident cases of prostate cancer were diagnosed during a mean follow-up of 14 and 20 years in EPIC and NLCS, respectively. None of the dietary factors was associated with the risk of total prostate cancer in EPIC (minimum FDR-corrected P, 0.37). Null associations were also observed by disease stage, grade and fatality, except for positive associations observed for intake of dry cakes/biscuits with low-grade and butter with aggressive prostate cancer, respectively, out of which the intake of dry cakes/biscuits was replicated in the NLCS.

Conclusions: Our findings provide little support for an association for the majority of the 92 examined dietary factors and risk of prostate cancer. The association of dry cakes/biscuits with low-grade prostate cancer warrants further replication given the scarcity in the literature.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00394-019-02132-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7501135PMC
October 2020

Sex hormone binding globulin and risk of breast cancer: a Mendelian randomization study.

Int J Epidemiol 2019 06;48(3):807-816

Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Ioannina School of Medicine, Ioannina, Greece.

Background: There are observational data suggesting an inverse association between circulating concentrations of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. However, causality is uncertain and few studies have investigated this association by tumour receptor status. We aimed to investigate these associations under the causal framework of Mendelian randomization (MR).

Methods: We used summary association estimates extracted from published genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analyses for SHBG and breast cancer, to perform two-sample MR analyses. Summary statistics were available for 122 977 overall breast cancer cases, of which 69 501 were estrogen receptor positive (ER+ve) and 21 468 were ER-ve, and 105 974 controls. To control for potential horizontal pleiotropy acting via body mass index (BMI), we performed multivariable inverse-variance weighted (IVW) MR as the main analysis, with the robustness of this approach further tested in sensitivity analyses.

Results: The multivariable IVW MR analysis indicated a lower risk of overall (odds ratio [OR]: 0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.90, 0.98; P: 0.006) and ER+ve (OR: 0.92; 95% CI: 0.87, 0.97; P: 0.003) breast cancer, and a higher risk of ER-ve disease (OR: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.18; P: 0.047) per 25 nmol/L higher SHBG levels. Sensitivity analyses were consistent with the findings of the main analysis.

Conclusions: We corroborated the previous literature evidence coming from observational studies for a potentially causal inverse association between SHBG concentrations and risk of ER+ve breast cancer, but our findings also suggested a potential novel positive association with ER-ve disease that warrants further investigation, given the low prior probability of being true.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyz107DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6659370PMC
June 2019

Coffee and tea consumption and risk of prostate cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

Int J Cancer 2019 01 16;144(2):240-250. Epub 2018 Nov 16.

Cancer Risk Factors and Life-Style Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute-ISPO, Florence, Italy.

The epidemiological evidence regarding the association of coffee and tea consumption with prostate cancer risk is inconclusive, and few cohort studies have assessed these associations by disease stage and grade. We examined the associations of coffee (total, caffeinated and decaffeinated) and tea intake with prostate cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Among 142,196 men, 7,036 incident prostate cancer cases were diagnosed over 14 years of follow-up. Data on coffee and tea consumption were collected through validated country-specific food questionnaires at baseline. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models to compute hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Models were stratified by center and age, and adjusted for anthropometric, lifestyle and dietary factors. Median coffee and tea intake were 375 and 106 mL/day, respectively, but large variations existed by country. Comparing the highest (median of 855 mL/day) versus lowest (median of 103 mL/day) consumers of coffee and tea (450 vs. 12 mL/day) the HRs were 1.02 (95% CI, 0.94-1.09) and 0.98 (95% CI, 0.90-1.07) for risk of total prostate cancer and 0.97 (95% CI, 0.79-1.21) and 0.89 (95% CI, 0.70-1.13) for risk of fatal disease, respectively. No evidence of association was seen for consumption of total, caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee or tea and risk of total prostate cancer or cancer by stage, grade or fatality in this large cohort. Further investigations are needed to clarify whether an association exists by different preparations or by concentrations and constituents of these beverages.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.31634DOI Listing
January 2019

Burden of hip fracture using disability-adjusted life-years: a pooled analysis of prospective cohorts in the CHANCES consortium.

Lancet Public Health 2017 05 11;2(5):e239-e246. Epub 2017 Apr 11.

Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece; WHO Collaborating Center for Nutrition and Health, Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition in Public Health, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, School of Medicine, Athens, Greece.

Background: No studies have estimated disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) lost due to hip fractures using real-life follow-up cohort data. We aimed to quantify the burden of disease due to incident hip fracture using DALYs in prospective cohorts in the CHANCES consortium, and to calculate population attributable fractions based on DALYs for specific risk factors.

Methods: We used data from six cohorts of participants aged 50 years or older at recruitment to calculate DALYs. We applied disability weights proposed by the National Osteoporosis Foundation and did a series of sensitivity analyses to examine the robustness of DALY estimates. We calculated population attributable fractions for smoking, body-mass index (BMI), physical activity, alcohol intake, type 2 diabetes and parity, use of hormone replacement therapy, and oral contraceptives in women. We calculated summary risk estimates across cohorts with pooled analysis and random-effects meta-analysis methods.

Findings: 223 880 men and women were followed up for a mean of 13 years (SD 6). 7724 (3·5%) participants developed an incident hip fracture, of whom 413 (5·3%) died as a result. 5964 DALYs (27 per 1000 individuals) were lost due to hip fractures, 1230 (20·6%) of which were in the group aged 75-79 years. 4150 (69·6%) DALYs were attributed to disability. Current smoking was the risk factor responsible for the greatest hip fracture burden (7·5%, 95% CI 5·2-9·7) followed by physical inactivity (5·5%, 2·1-8·5), history of diabetes (2·8%, 2·1-4·0), and low to average BMI (2·0%, 1·4-2·7), whereas low alcohol consumption (0·01-2·5 g per day) and high BMI had a protective effect.

Interpretation: Hip fracture can lead to a substantial loss of healthy life-years in elderly people. National public health policies should be strengthened to reduce hip fracture incidence and mortality. Primary prevention measures should be strengthened to prevent falls, and reduce smoking and a sedentary lifestyle.

Funding: European Community's Seventh Framework Programme.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2468-2667(17)30046-4DOI Listing
May 2017

Burden of Cancer in a Large Consortium of Prospective Cohorts in Europe.

J Natl Cancer Inst 2016 10 6;108(10). Epub 2016 May 6.

Affiliations of authors: Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Ioannina School of Medicine, Ioannina, Greece (KKT, NP); Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK (KKT); Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece (KKT, DC, CB, PB, DT, AT); World Health Organization Collaborating Center for Food and Nutrition Policies, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece (CB, VB, AT); International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France (MJ, HF, IS); UKCRC Centre of Excellence for Public Health, Queens University Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK (FK, MGO, AS); Department of Health Economics and Management, University of Wuppertal, Wuppertal, Germany (AN); Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands (AN); Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark (AT); Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands (AMM); Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain (JRQ); Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neurosciences (UPK) and Department of Biobank Research (SE), Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden (UPK); Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and German Cancer Consortium (HB), Heidelberg, Germany (HB, BS, JMOM, AKD); Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany (HB); Network Aging Research (NAR), Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany (JMOM); Department of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway (EBM, IN, GS, TW); Institute for Translational Epidemiology and Tisch Cancer Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (PB); Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (DT); Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece (DT).

Background: Disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) are an indicator of mortality, morbidity, and disability. We calculated DALYs for cancer in middle-aged and older adults participating in the Consortium on Health and Ageing Network of Cohorts in Europe and the United States (CHANCES) consortium.

Methods: A total of 90 199 participants from five European cohorts with 10 455 incident cancers and 4399 deaths were included in this study. DALYs were calculated as the sum of the years of life lost because of premature mortality (YLLs) and the years lost because of disability (YLDs). Population-attributable fractions (PAFs) were also estimated for five cancer risk factors, ie, smoking, adiposity, physical inactivity, alcohol intake, and type II diabetes.

Results: After a median follow-up of 12 years, the total number of DALYs lost from cancer was 34 474 (382 per 1000 individuals) with a similar distribution by sex. Lung cancer was responsible for the largest number of lost DALYs (22.9%), followed by colorectal (15.3%), prostate (10.2%), and breast cancer (8.7%). Mortality (81.6% of DALYs) predominated over disability. Ever cigarette smoking was the risk factor responsible for the greatest total cancer burden (24.0%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 22.2% to 26.0%), followed by physical inactivity (4.9%, 95% CI = 0.8% to 8.1%) and adiposity (1.8%, 95% CI = 0.2% to 2.8%).

Conclusions: DALYs lost from cancer were substantial in this large European sample of middle-aged and older adults. Even if the burden of disease because of cancer is predominantly caused by mortality, some cancers have sizeable consequences for disability. Smoking remained the predominant risk factor for total cancer burden.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djw127DOI Listing
October 2016

Coexistence of multiple omphalomesenteric duct anomalies.

J Coll Physicians Surg Pak 2012 Aug;22(8):524-6

First Surgical Department, General Regional Hospital George Papanikolaou, Thessaloniki, Greece.

The omphalomesenteric duct is an embryonic structure which connects the yolk sac to the midgut. The omphalomesenteric duct attenuates between the 5th and 9th week of gestation. Failure of the omphalomesenteric duct involution, either partial or complete, results in various omphalomesenteric duct remnants including Meckel's diverticulum, patent vitelline duct, fibrous band, sinus tract, umbilical polyp and cyst. Omphalomesenteric duct remnants are present in 2% of the population but related diseases have seldom been reported in adults. The simultaneous presence of sinus tract, omphalomesenteric cyst, fibrous ligament and Meckel's diverticulum has, according to authors' knowledge, never been reported. We present a case of a 23 years old male with persisting umbilical discharge for 2 years in whom there was coexistence of the above mentioned anomalies of the omphalomesenteric duct.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/08.2012/JCPSP.524526DOI Listing
August 2012

Does clinical response correlate with mucosal healing in patients with Crohn's disease of the small bowel? A prospective, case-series study using wireless capsule endoscopy.

Inflamm Bowel Dis 2008 Nov;14(11):1542-7

Evangelismos General Hospital, Second Department of Gastroenterology, Athens, Greece.

Background: There are no studies assessing mucosal healing of the small bowel in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). Our aim was to assess the correlation between clinical response and mucosal healing of the small bowel using wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE).

Methods: This was a prospective, multicenter, case-series study. Forty patients with known or suspected CD were included, recruited in 4 tertiary referral centers of Athens. They all had an acute flare-up of their disease (CD Activity Index [CDAI] >150), involvement of the small bowel, and the nonstricturing, nonpenetrating type of the disease. All patients underwent WCE prior to the initiation of any treatment. Treatment varied according to the treating physician. For the evaluation of mucosal healing, 3 endoscopic variables were collected: number of apthous ulcers, number of large ulcers, and period of time that any endoscopic lesion was visible (erythema, edema, ulcers). When patients achieved clinical response (after at least a month of treatment) they underwent a second WCE, with evaluation of the same parameters.

Results: The number of large ulcers was the only endoscopic variable that showed a significant improvement. The numbers of large ulcers before and after treatment were 8.3 +/- 1.4 and 5 +/- 0.8, respectively (mean +/- SEM) (mean difference 3.3 +/- 1.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.8-5.9, P = 0.01). The other 2 variables did not improve significantly.

Conclusions: Since only 1 out of 3 endoscopic variables improved significantly with treatment, we can conclude that clinical response does not seem to correlate with mucosal healing in patients with CD of the small bowel.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ibd.20509DOI Listing
November 2008

Parallel neuronal mechanisms underlying physiological force tremor in steady muscle contractions of humans.

J Neurophysiol 2006 Jan 14;95(1):53-66. Epub 2005 Sep 14.

Division of Basic Sciences, Medical School, University of Crete, 71003 Heraklion, Crete, Greece.

We present results from a study of the 6-to 12-Hz force tremor in relation to motor unit (MU) firing synchrony. Our experimental observations from 32 subjects, 321 contractions, and 427 recorded MUs reveal that tremor is accompanied by corresponding, in-phase MU rhythms that are additional to the ones at the MU intrinsic firing rates. This rhythmical synchrony is widespread and has a uniform strength that ranges from near zero to very large (MU/MU coherence > 0.50) in different contractions. Both the synchrony and the tremor are suppressed during ischemia, and this strongly suggests an involvement of spindle feedback in their generation. Furthermore, in the presence of substantial synchrony, the tremor enhancement, relative to the minimal tremor of ischemia, reflects the strength of the synchrony. Theoretical considerations based on these observations indicate that the muscle force signal is expected to show 1) frequency components in the band of the firing rates of the last-recruited, large MUs, and 2) because of the synchronized MU rhythms, an additional, distinct component with a size reflecting the strength of synchrony. Furthermore, synchronized MU rhythms, with frequencies in the 6- to 12-Hz range, are expected to arise from self-oscillations in the monosynaptic stretch reflex loop, due primarily to the associated muscle delay (several tens of milliseconds). Our results therefore reveal the parallel action of two tremor mechanisms, one of which involves MU synchrony probably caused by loop action. Clearly, the results on the synchrony and its impact also apply to other possible generators of tremor synchrony, including supraspinal ones.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/jn.00051.2005DOI Listing
January 2006

Early increase of lower oesophageal sphincter pressure after band ligation of oesophageal varices in cirrhotics: an intriguing phenomenon.

Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2002 Dec;14(12):1319-23

2nd Department of Gastroenterology, Propaedeutic, Athens University, Evangelismos Hospital, Greece.

Aim: We conducted a prospective, randomized comparison of endoscopic variceal ligation, sclerotherapy and metoclopramide injection in order to evaluate their early effect on lower oesophageal sphincter pressure.

Methods: Twenty-six patients with established cirrhosis and an episode of variceal bleeding controlled by one session of endoscopic therapy were randomized to undergo an oesophageal manometry. The patients' lower oesophageal sphincter pressure was evaluated, prior to and immediately after a single session of ligation (n = 10), a single session of sclerotherapy (n = 8) or a bolus injection of 20 mg metoclopramide hydrochloride (n = 8).

Results: Ligation produced a higher early increase in lower oesophageal sphincter pressure (from 12.3 +/- 2.3 to 27.8 +/- 3.0 mmHg) as compared with sclerotherapy (from 13.6 +/- 2.5 to 22.4 +/- 4.5 mmHg) or metoclopramide injection (from 14.6 +/- 3.2 to 22.5 +/- 2.9 mmHg); (P = 0.0001).

Conclusion: Our data indicate that ligation of oesophageal varices produces an early increase in lower oesophageal sphincter pressure in cirrhotic patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00042737-200212000-00006DOI Listing
December 2002

Effects of endoscopic variceal treatment on oesophageal function: a prospective, randomized study.

Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2002 Mar;14(3):263-9

Second Departments of Gastroenterology, Athens University, Athens, Greece.

Aim: Endoscopic methods are currently the most widely used techniques for the treatment of bleeding oesophageal varices (BOV). However, a number of complications may limit their usefulness. We conducted a prospective, randomized comparison of variceal ligation versus sclerotherapy in cirrhotics after the control of variceal haemorrhage to study the relative short-term risks of these two procedures with respect to oesophageal motility and gastro-oesophageal reflux.

Methods: Seventy-three patients with established cirrhosis and an episode of variceal bleeding controlled by one session of endoscopic therapy were randomized to treatment with sclerotherapy or ligation until variceal eradication. In 60 of these patients, oesophageal manometry and 24-h intra-oesophageal pH monitoring were performed at inclusion and 1 month after variceal eradication.

Results: After variceal eradication with sclerotherapy, peristaltic wave amplitude decreased from 76.2 +/- 14.7 mmHg to 61.6 +/- 17.7 mmHg (P = 0.0001), simultaneous contractions increased from 0% to 37.9% (P = 0.0008), and the percentage of time with pH < 4 increased from 1.60 +/- 0.25 to 4.91 +/- 1.16% in channel 1 (P = 0.0002) and from 1.82 +/- 0.27 to 5.69 +/- 1.37% in channel 2 (P = 0.0006). In contrast, the above parameters were not disturbed with ligation.

Conclusion: Our data define the advantages of ligation over sclerotherapy with respect to post-treatment oesophageal dysmotility and associated gastro-oesophageal reflux.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00042737-200203000-00010DOI Listing
March 2002
-->