Publications by authors named "Nikolai Wulff"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

An Optimized Screen Reduces the Number of GA Transporters and Provides Insights Into Nitrate Transporter 1/Peptide Transporter Family Substrate Determinants.

Front Plant Sci 2019 3;10:1106. Epub 2019 Oct 3.

DynaMo Center, Copenhagen Plant Science Centre, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark.

Based on recent in vitro data, a relatively large number of the plant nitrate transporter 1/peptide transporter family (NPF) proteins have been suggested to function as gibberellic acid (GA) transporters. Most GA transporting NPF proteins also appear to transport other structurally unrelated phytohormones or metabolites. Several of the GAs used in previous in vitro assays are membrane permeable weak organic acids whose movement across membranes are influenced by the pH-sensitive ion-trap mechanism. Moreover, a large proportion of in vitro GA transport activities have been demonstrated indirectly via long-term yeast-based GA-dependent growth assays that are limited to detecting transport of bioactive GAs. Thus, there is a need for an optimized transport assay for identifying and characterizing GA transport. Here, we develop an improved transport assay in Xenopus laevis oocytes, wherein we directly measure movement of six different GAs across oocyte membranes over short time. We show that membrane permeability of GAs in oocytes can be predicted based on number of oxygen atoms and that several GAs do not diffuse over membranes regardless of changes in pH values. In addition, we show that small changes in internal cellular pH can result in strongly altered distribution of membrane permeable phytohormones. This prompts caution when interpreting heterologous transport activities. We use our transport assay to screen all Arabidopsis thaliana NPF proteins for transport activity towards six GAs (two membrane permeable and four non-permeable). The results presented here, significantly reduce the number of bona fide NPF GA transporters in Arabidopsis and narrow the activity to fewer subclades within the family. Furthermore, to gain first insight into the molecular determinants of substrate specificities toward organic molecules transported in the NPF, we charted all surface exposed amino acid residues in the substrate-binding cavity and correlated them to GA transport. This analysis suggests distinct residues within the substrate-binding cavity that are shared between GA transporting NPF proteins; the potential roles of these residues in determining substrate specificity are discussed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2019.01106DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6785635PMC
October 2019

A transportome-scale amiRNA-based screen identifies redundant roles of Arabidopsis ABCB6 and ABCB20 in auxin transport.

Nat Commun 2018 10 11;9(1):4204. Epub 2018 Oct 11.

School of Plant Sciences and Food Security, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, 69978, Israel.

Transport of signaling molecules is of major importance for regulating plant growth, development, and responses to the environment. A prime example is the spatial-distribution of auxin, which is regulated via transporters to govern developmental patterning. A critical limitation in our ability to identify transporters by forward genetic screens is their potential functional redundancy. Here, we overcome part of this functional redundancy via a transportome, multi-targeted forward-genetic screen using artificial-microRNAs (amiRNAs). We generate a library of 3000 plant lines expressing 1777 amiRNAs, designed to target closely homologous genes within subclades of transporter families and identify, genotype and quantitatively phenotype, 80 lines showing reproducible shoot growth phenotypes. Within this population, we discover and characterize a strong redundant role for the unstudied ABCB6 and ABCB20 genes in auxin transport and response. The unique multi-targeted lines generated in this study could serve as a genetic resource that is expected to reveal additional transporters.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-06410-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6182007PMC
October 2018

Dynamic Modeling of Indole Glucosinolate Hydrolysis and Its Impact on Auxin Signaling.

Front Plant Sci 2018 26;9:550. Epub 2018 Apr 26.

DynaMo Center, Copenhagen Plant Science Centre, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark.

Plants release chemicals to deter attackers. relies on multiple defense compounds, including indol-3-ylmethyl glucosinolate (I3G), which upon hydrolysis initiated by myrosinase enzymes releases a multitude of bioactive compounds, among others, indole-3-acetonitrile and indole-3-acetoisothiocyanate. The highly unstable isothiocyanate rapidly reacts with other molecules. One of the products, indole-3-carbinol, was reported to inhibit auxin signaling through binding to the TIR1 auxin receptor. On the contrary, the nitrile product of I3G hydrolysis can be converted by nitrilase enzymes to form the primary auxin molecule, indole-3-acetic acid, which activates TIR1. This suggests that auxin signaling is subject to both antagonistic and protagonistic effects of I3G hydrolysis upon attack. We hypothesize that I3G hydrolysis and auxin signaling form an incoherent feedforward loop and we build a mathematical model to examine the regulatory network dynamics. We use molecular docking to investigate the possible antagonistic properties of different I3G hydrolysis products by competitive binding to the TIR1 receptor. Our simulations reveal an uncoupling of auxin concentration and signaling, and we determine that enzyme activity and antagonist binding affinity are key parameters for this uncoupling. The molecular docking predicts that several I3G hydrolysis products strongly antagonize auxin signaling. By comparing a tissue disrupting attack - e.g., by chewing insects or necrotrophic pathogens that causes rapid release of I3G hydrolysis products - to sustained cell-autonomous I3G hydrolysis, e.g., upon infection by biotrophic pathogens, we find that each scenario gives rise to distinct auxin signaling dynamics. This suggests that plants have different defense versus growth strategies depending on the nature of the attack.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2018.00550DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5932361PMC
April 2018
-->