Publications by authors named "Nikola Ilankovic"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Polysomnographic sleep patterns in depressive, schizophrenic and healthy subjects.

Psychiatr Danub 2014 Mar;26(1):20-6

Center of Clinical Neurophysiology & Sleep Research, University Psychiatric Clinic, Pasterova 2, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia,

Background: Sleep disorders are frequent symptoms described in psychiatric patients with major depression and schizophrenia. These patients also exhibit changes in sleep architecture measured by polysomnography (PSG) during sleep. The aim of the present study was to identify potential biomarkers to facilitate diagnosis based on PSG measurements.

Subjects And Methods: Thirty (30) patients with schizophrenia, 30 patients with major depression and 30 healthy control subjects were investigated in the present study. All subjects underwent PSG measurements for a minimum time of 8 hours according to the criteria of Rechtscahffen & Kales (1968). We tested the potential of multiple sleep variables to predict diagnosis in different groups by using linear discriminant analysis (LDA).

Results: There were significant differences in PSG variables between healthy control subjects and psychiatric patients (total sleep time, sleep latency, number of awakenings, time of awakening after sleep onset, REM 1 latency, REM 1 and index of endogenous periodicity). Importantly, LDA was able to predict the correct diagnosis in 88% of all cases.

Conclusions: The presented analysis showed commonalities and differences in PSG changes in patients with major depressive disorder and in patients with schizophrenia. Our results underline the potential of PSG measurements to facilitate diagnostic processes.
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March 2014

[Development of forensic psychiatry in Serbia].

Srp Arh Celok Lek 2013 May-Jun;141(5-6):415-21

The development of legislation in the field of mental health in our region is linked with the emergence and development of the oldest psychiatric hospitals in Serbia.The principle that the mentally ill who committed a criminal offense need to be placed in a psychiatric hospital instead of a prison was introduced at the same time as in the most developed European countries. The founders of the Serbian forensic psychiatry, Dr. Jovan Danić, Dr.Vojislav Subotić Jr. and Dr. Dusan Subotić, were all trained at the first Serbian Psychiatric Hospital ("Home for the Unsound of Mind") that was founded in 1861 in the part of Belgrade called Guberevac. Their successors were psychiatric enthusiasts Prof. Dr.Vladimir F.Vujić and Prof. Dr. Laza Stanojević. A formal establishment of the School of Medicine of Belgrade, with acquirement of new experience and positive shifts within this field, based on the general act of the University in 1932, led to the formation of the Council of the School of Medicine, which, as a collective body passed expert opinions. Thus, the first Forensic Medicine Committee of the School of Medicine was formed and started its activities in 1931 when Forensic Medicine Committee Regulations were accepted. After the World War II prominent educators in the field of mental health, and who particularly contributed to further development of forensic psychiatry in Serbia were Prof. Dr. Uros Jekić, Prof Dr. Dusan Jevtić, Dr. Stevan Jovanović, Prof. Dr. Borislav Kapamadzija, Prof. Dr. Maksim Sternić, Prof. Dr. Josif Vesel and Prof. Dr. Dimitrije Milovanović.
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December 2015

Chiari I malformation in adults: epileptiform events and schizophrenia-like psychosis.

Psychiatr Danub 2006 Jun;18(1-2):92-6

Institute of Psychiatry, Dep. of Neuropsychiatry, University Clinical Center, Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro.

We would like to report on a very interesting clinical case of recurrent psychotic events caused with Chiari I malformation in adults. The mediosagital reconstruction of MR image of the brain and cranio-cervical region is the most important diagnostic approach in finding the cause of epileptiform events, neurological signs and psychotic illness caused by Chiari malformation.
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June 2006

Predictive potential of cavum septi pellucidi (CSP) in schizophrenics, alcoholics and persons with past head trauma. A post-mortem study.

Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci 2004 Aug;254(4):228-30

Institute of Anatomy, 4/2 Dr Subotica, 11000 Beograd, Serbia and Montenegro.

The increased presence of cavum septi pellucidi (CSP) was reported among people suffering from schizophrenia, alcoholism or it could be a remnant of an old head trauma. We have tried to compare not only prevalences, but also lengths, widths and depths of the obtained cava in an effort to emphasize the importance of linear parameters in routine diagnostics. On 479 cadavers, 310 male and 169 female, aged 22 to 89; 110 brains had a CSP: 40 persons had no data about prior neuropsychiatric disease, 25 were schizophrenics, 25 alcoholics and 20 received a serious head blow during their lifetime. The prevalence of CSP in the entire group was 22.96%; among normal persons 10.61%; in schizophrenics 83.33%, in alcoholics 58.14 % and in persons with sustained prior head trauma 68.96%. There was a statistically significant difference in ratings, lengths and widths of CSP between schizophrenics, alcoholics, head traumatized and normals. Both length and width were revealed as parameters of importance for CSP selection. CSP is more frequent, longer and wider in persons who are suffering from schizophrenia, alcohol addicts and those who had sustained one or several head blows in the past. Its linear parameters are advisable to be measured.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00406-004-0483-4DOI Listing
August 2004

Dementia paralytica (neurosyphilis): a clinical case study.

World J Biol Psychiatry 2003 Jul;4(3):135-8

Institute of Psychiatry, University Clinical Centre, 11000 Belgrade, Pasterova 2, Yugoslavia.

This study reminds clinicians that syphilis presents in many guises. Wars, migration and sexual promiscuity prepare the ground for its return as an important cause of neurological and psychiatric syndromes. Our patient's diagnosis was not suspected at earlier admission. Stage III spirochaetosis was improved by high dose penicillin.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15622970310029908DOI Listing
July 2003
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