Publications by authors named "Niklas-Maximilian Epping"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Customizable 3D-Printed (Co-)Cultivation Systems for In Vitro Study of Angiogenesis.

Materials (Basel) 2020 Sep 25;13(19). Epub 2020 Sep 25.

Institute of Technical Chemistry, Leibniz University Hannover, Callinstra├če 5, 30167 Hannover, Germany.

Due to the ever-increasing resolution of 3D printing technology, additive manufacturing is now even used to produce complex devices for laboratory applications. Personalized experimental devices or entire cultivation systems of almost unlimited complexity can potentially be manufactured within hours from start to finish-an enormous potential for experimental parallelization in a highly controllable environment. This study presents customized 3D-printed co-cultivation systems, which qualify for angiogenesis studies. In these systems, endothelial and mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSC) were indirectly co-cultivated-that is, both cell types were physically separated through a rigid, 3D-printed barrier in the middle, while still sharing the same cell culture medium that allows for the exchange of signalling molecules. Biochemical-based cytotoxicity assays initially confirmed that the 3D printing material does not exert any negative effects on cells. Since the material also enables phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy, the behaviour of cells could be observed over the entire cultivation via both. Microscopic observations and subsequent quantitative analysis revealed that endothelial cells form tubular-like structures as angiogenic feature when indirectly co-cultured alongside AD-MSCs in the 3D-printed co-cultivation system. In addition, further 3D-printed devices are also introduced that address different issues and aspire to help in varying experimental setups. Our results mark an important step forward for the integration of customized 3D-printed systems as self-contained test systems or equipment in biomedical applications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ma13194290DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7579111PMC
September 2020

Real-Time Live-Cell Imaging Technology Enables High-Throughput Screening to Verify in Vitro Biocompatibility of 3D Printed Materials.

Materials (Basel) 2019 Jul 2;12(13). Epub 2019 Jul 2.

Institute of Technical Chemistry, Leibniz University Hannover, Callinstra├če 5, 30167 Hannover, Germany.

With growing advances in three-dimensional (3D) printing technology, the availability and diversity of printing materials has rapidly increased over the last years. 3D printing has quickly become a useful tool for biomedical and various laboratory applications, offering a tremendous potential for efficiently fabricating complex devices in a short period of time. However, there still remains a lack of information regarding the impact of printing materials and post-processing techniques on cell behavior. This study introduces real-time live-cell imaging technology as a fast, user-friendly, and high-throughput screening strategy to verify the in vitro biocompatibility of 3D printed materials. Polyacrylate-based photopolymer material was printed using high-resolution 3D printing techniques, post-processed using three different procedures, and then analyzed with respect to its effects on cell viability, apoptosis, and necrosis of adipogenic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). When using ethanol for the post-processing procedure and disinfection, no significant effects on MSCs could be detected. For the analyses a novel image-based live-cell analysis system was compared against a biochemical-based standard plate reader assay and traditional flow cytometry. This comparison illustrates the superiority of using image-based detection of in vitro biocompatibility with respect to analysis time, usability, and scientific outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ma12132125DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6651444PMC
July 2019
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