Professor Nigel G Halford, BSc, MSc, PhD - Rothamsted Research

Professor Nigel G Halford

BSc, MSc, PhD

Rothamsted Research

Harpenden | United Kingdom

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-6488-2530

Professor Nigel G Halford, BSc, MSc, PhD - Rothamsted Research

Professor Nigel G Halford

BSc, MSc, PhD

Introduction

I obtained my first degree in Genetics from the University of Liverpool in 1983 and a Masters degree in Applied Molecular Biology and Biotechnology from University College London in 1984. I studied the genes encoding a family of wheat seed proteins called the high molecular weight subunits of glutenin for my PhD while at Rothamsted in the 1980s, then spent 11 years at Long Ashton Research Station near Bristol before returning to Rothamsted in 2002. I am a Visiting Professor at Shanghai Academy of Agricultural Sciences and was awarded The Magnolia Silver Award by the Shanghai Municipal People’s Government in 2012. I am also Special Professor at the University of Nottingham and a former member of the UK’s Advisory Committee for Animal Feedingstuffs (ACAF). I am Council Member and Programme Secretary for the Association of Applied Biologists, and a Fellow of the Society of Biology.
My team works on the genetics of metabolic regulation in crop plants, how plant metabolism is affected by stress and how it can be manipulated to improve crop yield and food safety. Specific interests are:
Interactions between metabolic and stress signalling pathways in plants
Role of ABA and SNF1-related protein kinases (SnRKs) in controlling cereal seed development
Role of metabolic signalling in response to disease
Role of protein kinase GCN2 in controlling free amino acid levels in cereal grain; role of asparagine as a signalling molecule
Reducing the acrylamide-forming potential of wheat, rye and potato: understanding the genetic and agronomic factors that affect free asparagine and reducing sugar accumulation; mathematical modelling of asparagine metabolism
The effect of stress on crop composition
Plant biotechnology

Primary Affiliation: Rothamsted Research - Harpenden , United Kingdom

Education

Jan 1985 - Jan 1989
Council for National Academic Awards
PhD
Jan 1983 - Jan 1984
University College London
MSc; Applied Molecular Biology and Biotechnology
Biochemistry
Jan 1980 - Jan 1983
University of Liverpool
BSc (Honours) Genetics, upper second class
Genetics

Experience

Jan 1991 - Jan 2002
University of Bristol
Project Leader
Agricultural Sciences / Long Ashton Research Station
Jan 1984 - Jan 1991
Rothamsted Research
Scientific Officer / Higher Scientific Officer
Biochemistry
Jan 1984 - Jan 1991
Rothamsted Research
Scientific Officer / Higher Scientific Officer
Biochemistry

Publications

332Publications

471Reads

23Profile Views

930PubMed Central Citations

The wheat SnRK1α family and its contribution to Fusarium toxin tolerance.

Plant Sci 2019 Nov 13;288:110217. Epub 2019 Aug 13.

UCD School of Biology and Environmental Science and Earth Institute, College of Science, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.plantsci.2019.110217DOI Listing
November 2019
3.607 Impact Factor

Contrasting gene expression patterns in grain of high and low asparagine wheat genotypes in response to sulphur supply.

BMC Genomics 2019 Aug 1;20(1):628. Epub 2019 Aug 1.

Plant Sciences Department, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire, AL5 2JQ, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12864-019-5991-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6676566PMC
August 2019
3.986 Impact Factor

Legislation governing genetically modified and genome-edited crops in Europe: the need for change.

Authors:
Nigel G Halford

J Sci Food Agric 2019 Jan 19;99(1):8-12. Epub 2018 Aug 19.

Plant Sciences Department, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.9227DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6492171PMC
January 2019
7 Reads
1.714 Impact Factor

Acrylamide in Food

World Scientific

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May 2018
1 Read

Genomic, biochemical and modelling analyses of asparagine synthetases from wheat

Frontiers in Plant Science

Asparagine synthetase activity in cereals has become an important issue with the discovery that free asparagine concentration determines the potential for formation of acrylamide, a probably carcinogenic processing contaminant, in baked cereal products. Asparagine synthetase catalyses the ATP-dependent transfer of the amino group of glutamine to a molecule of aspartate to generate glutamate and asparagine. Here, asparagine synthetase-encoding polymerase chain reaction products were amplified from wheat (Triticum aestivum) cv. Spark cDNA. The encoded proteins were assigned the names TaASN1, TaASN2 and TaASN3 on the basis of comparisons with other wheat and cereal asparagine synthetases. Although very similar to each other they differed slightly in size, with molecular masses of 65.49, 65.06 and 66.24 kDa, respectively. Chromosomal positions and scaffold references were established for TaASN1, TaASN2 and TaASN3, and a fourth, more recently identified gene, TaASN4. TaASN1, TaASN2 and TaASN4 were all found to be single copy genes, located on Chromosomes 5, 3 and 4, respectively, of each genome (A, B and D), although variety Chinese Spring lacked a TaASN2 gene in the B genome. Two copies of TaASN3 were found on Chromosome 1 of each genome, and these were given the names TaASN3.1 and TaASN3.2. The TaASN1, TaASN2 and TaASN3 PCR products were heterologously-expressed in Escherichia coli (TaASN4 was not investigated in this part of the study). Western blot analysis identified two monoclonal antibodies that recognised the three proteins, but did not distinguish between them, despite being raised to epitopes SKKPRMIEVAAP and GGSNKPGVMNTV in the variable C-terminal regions of the proteins. The heterologously-expressed TaASN1 and TaASN2 proteins were found to be active asparagine synthetases, producing asparagine and glutamate from glutamine and aspartate. The asparagine synthetase reaction was modelled using SNOOPY® software and information from the BRENDA database to generate differential equations to describe the reaction stages, based on mass action kinetics. Experimental data from the reactions catalysed by TaASN1 and TaASN2 were entered into the model using Copasi, enabling values to be determined for kinetic parameters. Both the reaction data and the modelling showed that the enzymes continued to produce glutamate even when the synthesis of asparagine had ceased due

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January 2018

Acrylamide levels in potato crisps in Europe from 2002 to 2016

Food Additives and Contaminants: Part A

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September 2017
1 Read

Acrylamide-forming potential of potatoes grown at different locations, and the ratio of free asparagine to reducing sugars at which free asparagine becomes a limiting factor for acrylamide formation.

Food Chem 2017 Apr 30;220:76-86. Epub 2016 Sep 30.

Plant Biology and Crop Science Department, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ, United Kingdom. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2016.09.199DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5119237PMC
April 2017
15 Reads
3 Citations
3.391 Impact Factor

Relationship between Alkylpyrazine and Acrylamide Formation in Potato Chips

ACS Symposium Series, Vol. 1237, Browned Flavors: Analysis, Formation, & Physiology

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2016
1 Read

Reducing the Acrylamide-Forming Potential of Wheat, Rye and Potato: A Review.

ACS Symposium Series, Vol. 1237, Browned Flavors: Analysis, Formation, & Physiology

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2016
1 Read

Effects of Fungicide Treatment on Free Amino Acid Concentration and Acrylamide-Forming Potential in Wheat.

J Agric Food Chem 2016 Dec 15;64(51):9689-9696. Epub 2016 Dec 15.

Plant Biology and Crop Science Department, Rothamsted Research , Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ, United Kingdom.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jafc.6b04520DOI Listing
December 2016
5 Reads
3 Citations
2.912 Impact Factor

Genomic advancement: Aiming to affirm and improve human life.

Appl Transl Genom 2016 Dec 9;11:1-2. Epub 2016 Nov 9.

Rothamsted Research, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.atg.2016.11.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5167428PMC
December 2016
2 Reads

Food safety: Structure and expression of the asparagine synthetase gene family of wheat.

J Cereal Sci 2016 Mar;68:122-131

Plant Biology and Crop Science Department, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ, United Kingdom.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcs.2016.01.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4829093PMC
March 2016
32 Reads
4 Citations
2.094 Impact Factor

Acrylamide in potato crisps prepared from 20 UK-grown varieties: effects of variety and tuber storage time.

Food Chem 2015 Sep 26;182:1-8. Epub 2015 Feb 26.

Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences, University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading RG6 6AP, UK.

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S03088146150029
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2015.02.103DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4396699PMC
September 2015
4 Reads
4 Citations
3.391 Impact Factor

Producing a road map that enables plants to cope with future climate change.

J Exp Bot 2015 Jun;66(12):3433-4

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jxb/erv277DOI Listing
June 2015
3 Reads
1 Citation
5.530 Impact Factor

Effects of water availability on free amino acids, sugars, and acrylamide-forming potential in potato.

J Agric Food Chem 2015 Mar 2;63(9):2566-75. Epub 2015 Mar 2.

Plant Biology and Crop Science Department and ‡Computational and Systems Biology Department, Rothamsted Research , Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ, United Kingdom.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf506031wDOI Listing
March 2015
5 Reads
3 Citations
2.912 Impact Factor

Effects of abiotic stress and crop management on cereal grain composition: implications for food quality and safety.

J Exp Bot 2015 Mar 26;66(5):1145-56. Epub 2014 Nov 26.

Biotechnology Research Institute, Shanghai Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 2901 Beidi Road, Minhang District, Shanghai 201106, Peoples Republic of China

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jxb/eru473DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4438447PMC
March 2015
5 Reads
9 Citations
5.530 Impact Factor

Safety assessment of genetically modified plants with deliberately altered composition.

Plant Biotechnol J 2014 Aug 16;12(6):651-4. Epub 2014 Apr 16.

Department of Plant Biology and Crop Science, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pbi.12194DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4265246PMC
August 2014
14 Reads
5.752 Impact Factor

Reducing the potential for processing contaminant formation in cereal products.

J Cereal Sci 2014 May;59(3):382-392

Plant Biology and Crop Science Department, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ, United Kingdom.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcs.2013.11.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4026124PMC
May 2014
4 Reads
6 Citations
2.094 Impact Factor

Acrylamide concentrations in potato crisps in Europe from 2002 to 2011.

Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess 2013 4;30(9):1493-500. Epub 2013 Jul 4.

a Computational and Systems Biology Department , Rothamsted Research , Harpenden , UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19440049.2013.805439DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3778518PMC
April 2014
4 Reads
8 Citations

Photosynthetic assimilation of ¹⁴C into amino acids in potato (Solanum tuberosum) and asparagine in the tubers.

Planta 2014 Jan 15;239(1):161-70. Epub 2013 Oct 15.

Plant Biology and Crop Science Department, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire, AL5 2JQ, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00425-013-1967-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3898143PMC
January 2014
6 Reads
4 Citations
3.263 Impact Factor

Expression analysis of abscisic acid (ABA) and metabolic signalling factors in developing endosperm and embryo of barley.

J Cereal Sci 2013 Sep;58(2):255-262

Plant Biology and Crop Science Department, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ, United Kingdom.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcs.2013.06.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3990443PMC
September 2013
6 Reads
5 Citations
2.094 Impact Factor

Effects of nitrogen and sulfur fertilization on free amino acids, sugars, and acrylamide-forming potential in potato.

J Agric Food Chem 2013 Jul 27;61(27):6734-42. Epub 2013 Jun 27.

Plant Biology and Crop Science Department and ‡Computational and Systems Biology Department, Rothamsted Research , Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ, United Kingdom.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf401570xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3711126PMC
July 2013
5 Reads
4 Citations
2.912 Impact Factor

Effects of variety and nutrient availability on the acrylamide-forming potential of rye grain.

J Cereal Sci 2013 May;57(3):463-470

Plant Biology and Crop Science Department, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ, United Kingdom.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcs.2013.02.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3688320PMC
May 2013
4 Reads
12 Citations
2.094 Impact Factor

Concentrations of free amino acids and sugars in nine potato varieties: effects of storage and relationship with acrylamide formation.

J Agric Food Chem 2012 Dec 26;60(48):12044-55. Epub 2012 Nov 26.

Plant Biology and Crop Science Department, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ, United Kingdom.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf3037566DOI Listing
December 2012
2 Reads
11 Citations
2.912 Impact Factor

The acrylamide problem: a plant and agronomic science issue.

J Exp Bot 2012 May 16;63(8):2841-51. Epub 2012 Feb 16.

Department of Plant Science, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Herts, AL5 2JQ, UK.

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https://academic.oup.com/jxb/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jxb/
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jxb/ers011DOI Listing
May 2012
3 Reads
18 Citations
5.530 Impact Factor

Overexpression of GCN2-type protein kinase in wheat has profound effects on free amino acid concentration and gene expression.

Plant Biotechnol J 2012 Apr 10;10(3):328-40. Epub 2011 Nov 10.

Department of Plant Science, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire, UK.

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1467-7652.2011.00665.x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-7652.2011.00665.xDOI Listing
April 2012
5 Reads
11 Citations
5.752 Impact Factor

Evidence that abscisic acid promotes degradation of SNF1-related protein kinase (SnRK) 1 in wheat and activation of a putative calcium-dependent SnRK2.

J Exp Bot 2012 Jan 11;63(2):913-24. Epub 2011 Oct 11.

Departamento de Bioquímica, Facultad de Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Distrito Federal 04510, Mexico.

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https://academic.oup.com/jxb/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jxb/
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jxb/err320DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3254688PMC
January 2012
3 Reads
19 Citations
5.530 Impact Factor

The sucrose non-fermenting-1-related (SnRK) family of protein kinases: potential for manipulation to improve stress tolerance and increase yield.

J Exp Bot 2011 Jan 25;62(3):883-93. Epub 2010 Oct 25.

Departamento de Bioquímica, Facultad de Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Distrito Federal 04510, Mexico.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jxb/erq331DOI Listing
January 2011
5 Reads
35 Citations
5.530 Impact Factor

Preface

Plant Biotechnology: Current and Future Applications of Genetically Modified Crops

http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84889406706&partnerID=MN8TOARS

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2010
2 Reads

The interface between metabolic and stress signalling.

Ann Bot 2010 Feb 8;105(2):197-203. Epub 2009 Dec 8.

Plant Science Department, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aob/mcp285DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2814758PMC
February 2010
8 Reads
48 Citations
3.654 Impact Factor

Free amino acids and sugars in rye grain: implications for acrylamide formation.

J Agric Food Chem 2010 Feb;58(3):1959-69

Plant Science Department, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ, United Kingdom.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf903577bDOI Listing
February 2010
40 Reads
12 Citations
2.912 Impact Factor

New insights on the effects of heat stress on crops.

Authors:
Nigel G Halford

J Exp Bot 2009 23;60(15):4215-6. Epub 2009 Oct 23.

Department of Plant Science, Rothamsted Research, Hertfordshire, UK. nigel.halford

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jxb/erp311DOI Listing
January 2010
5 Reads
5.530 Impact Factor

Identifying target traits and molecular mechanisms for wheat breeding under a changing climate.

J Exp Bot 2009 1;60(10):2791-804. Epub 2009 Jun 1.

Department of Biomathematics and Bioinformatics, Rothamsted Research, Centre for Mathematical and Computational Biology, Harpenden, Herts AL5 2JQ, UK.

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http://jxb.oxfordjournals.org/content/60/10/2791.full.pdf
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http://jxb.oxfordjournals.org/lookup/doi/10.1093/jxb/erp164
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jxb/erp164DOI Listing
September 2009
4 Reads
16 Citations
5.530 Impact Factor

Snf1-related protein kinases (SnRKs) act within an intricate network that links metabolic and stress signalling in plants.

Biochem J 2009 Apr;419(2):247-59

Plant Science Department, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1042/BJ20082408DOI Listing
April 2009
2 Reads
80 Citations
4.400 Impact Factor

Effects of genotype and environment on free amino acid levels in wheat grain: implications for acrylamide formation during processing.

J Agric Food Chem 2009 Feb;57(3):1013-21

Plant Science Department, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf8031292DOI Listing
February 2009
14 Reads
19 Citations
2.912 Impact Factor

GCN2-dependent phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor-2alpha in Arabidopsis.

J Exp Bot 2008 4;59(11):3131-41. Epub 2008 Jul 4.

Centre for Crop Genetic Improvement, Plant Sciences Department, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jxb/ern169DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2504353PMC
November 2008
4 Reads
27 Citations
5.530 Impact Factor

Plant biotechnology: transgenic crops.

Adv Biochem Eng Biotechnol 2008 ;111:149-86

Rothamsted Research, AL5 2JQ, Harpenden, Herts, UK.

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/10_2008_095
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/10_2008_095DOI Listing
October 2008
10 Reads
3 Citations
1.660 Impact Factor

Reducing acrylamide precursors in raw materials derived from wheat and potato.

J Agric Food Chem 2008 Aug 15;56(15):6167-72. Epub 2008 Jul 15.

Centre for Crop Genetic Improvement, Plant Science Department, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ, United Kingdom.

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http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf800279d
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf800279dDOI Listing
August 2008
7 Reads
9 Citations
2.912 Impact Factor

Effects of plant sulfur nutrition on acrylamide and aroma compounds in cooked wheat.

J Agric Food Chem 2008 Aug 15;56(15):6173-9. Epub 2008 Jul 15.

Department of Food Biosciences, University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading RG6 6AP, United Kingdom.

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http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf0730441
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf0730441DOI Listing
August 2008
3 Reads
2 Citations
2.912 Impact Factor

Changes in free amino acids and sugars in potatoes due to sulfate fertilization and the effect on acrylamide formation.

J Agric Food Chem 2007 Jun 26;55(13):5363-6. Epub 2007 May 26.

Department of Food Biosciences, University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading, United Kingdom.

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http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf070447s
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf070447sDOI Listing
June 2007
6 Reads
6 Citations
2.912 Impact Factor

DNA sequences from Arabidopsis, which encode protein kinases and function as upstream regulators of Snf1 in yeast.

J Biol Chem 2007 Apr 19;282(14):10472-9. Epub 2007 Jan 19.

Department of Crop Performance and Improvement, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden AL5 2JQ, United Kingdom.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M611244200DOI Listing
April 2007
2 Reads
17 Citations
4.573 Impact Factor

Risk Assessment, Regulation and Labeling

Plant Biotechnology: Current and Future Applications of Genetically Modified Crops

http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84889277564&partnerID=MN8TOARS

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2006
1 Read

Formation of high levels of acrylamide during the processing of flour derived from sulfate-deprived wheat.

J Agric Food Chem 2006 Nov;54(23):8951-5

Crop Performance and Improvement Division, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom.

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http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf0623081
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf0623081DOI Listing
November 2006
4 Reads
21 Citations
2.912 Impact Factor

Comparison of repetitive sequences derived from high molecular weight subunits of wheat glutenin, an elastomeric plant protein.

Biomacromolecules 2006 Apr;7(4):1096-103

Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UA, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/bm050893tDOI Listing
April 2006
9 Reads
5.750 Impact Factor

Nutrient sensing in plant meristems.

Plant Mol Biol 2006 Apr;60(6):981-93

School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, PO Box 915, CF72 9DU, Cardiff, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11103-005-5749-3DOI Listing
April 2006
3 Reads
17 Citations
4.260 Impact Factor

Enhanced seed phytosterol accumulation through expression of a modified HMG-CoA reductase.

Plant Biotechnol J 2006 Mar;4(2):219-29

Crop Performance and Improvement, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-7652.2005.00174.xDOI Listing
March 2006
15 Reads
12 Citations
5.752 Impact Factor

Comparative analysis of the D genome-encoded high-molecular weight subunits of glutenin.

Theor Appl Genet 2005 Oct 11;111(6):1183-90. Epub 2005 Oct 11.

Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00122-005-0051-yDOI Listing
October 2005
4 Reads
6 Citations
3.790 Impact Factor

Evidence of diversity within the SnRK1b gene family of Hordeum species.

Genome 2005 Aug;48(4):661-73

Long Ashton Research Station, Bristol, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/g05-024DOI Listing
August 2005
2 Reads
1.424 Impact Factor

Changes in protein secondary structure during gluten deformation studied by dynamic fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

Biomacromolecules 2005 Jan-Feb;6(1):255-61

Institute of Food Research, Norwich Research Park, Colney, Norwich NR4 7UA, United Kingdom.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/bm049584dDOI Listing
June 2005
7 Reads
7 Citations
5.750 Impact Factor

Design, expression and characterisation of lysine-rich forms of the barley seed protein CI-2.

Biochim Biophys Acta 2005 Mar 4;1747(2):221-7. Epub 2005 Jan 4.

Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbapap.2004.11.018DOI Listing
March 2005
4 Reads
1 Citation

SNF1-related protein kinase (snRK1) phosphorylates class I heat shock protein.

Plant Physiol Biochem 2004 Feb;42(2):111-6

Long Ashton Research Station, Long Ashton, Bristol, BS41 9AE United Kingdom.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.plaphy.2003.11.009DOI Listing
February 2004
6 Reads
3 Citations
2.760 Impact Factor

Highly conserved protein kinases involved in the regulation of carbon and amino acid metabolism.

J Exp Bot 2004 Jan 28;55(394):35-42. Epub 2003 Nov 28.

Crop Performance and Improvement, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ, UK.

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https://academic.oup.com/jxb/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jxb/
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jxb/erh019DOI Listing
January 2004
3 Reads
22 Citations
5.530 Impact Factor

Carbon metabolite sensing and signalling.

Plant Biotechnol J 2003 Nov;1(6):381-98

Crop Performance and Improvement, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1467-7652.2003.00046.xDOI Listing
November 2003
35 Reads
23 Citations
5.752 Impact Factor

Molecular cloning of an arabidopsis homologue of GCN2, a protein kinase involved in co-ordinated response to amino acid starvation.

Planta 2003 Aug 28;217(4):668-75. Epub 2003 Mar 28.

Department of Crop Performance and Improvement, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire, AL5 2JQ, UK.

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http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s00425-003-1025
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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00425-003-1025-4
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00425-003-1025-4DOI Listing
August 2003
1 Read
20 Citations
3.263 Impact Factor

Genetics of wheat gluten proteins.

Adv Genet 2003 ;49:111-84

Long Ashton Research Station, Department of Agricultural Sciences, University of Bristol, Long Ashton, Bristol BS41 9AF, United Kingdom.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0065-2660(03)01003-4DOI Listing
August 2003
8 Reads
33 Citations
6.760 Impact Factor

The high molecular weight subunits of wheat glutenin and their role in determining wheat processing properties.

Adv Food Nutr Res 2003 ;45:219-302

IACR-Long Ashton Research Station, Department of Agricultural Sciences, University of Bristol, Long Ashton, Bristol BS41 9AF, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s1043-4526(03)45006-7DOI Listing
February 2003
12 Reads
23 Citations

Antisense SNF1-related (SnRK1) protein kinase gene represses transient activity of an alpha-amylase (alpha-Amy2) gene promoter in cultured wheat embryos.

J Exp Bot 2003 Feb;54(383):739-47

Crop Performance and Improvement, Long Ashton Research Station, Long Ashton, Bristol BS41 9AF, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jxb/erg085DOI Listing
February 2003
4 Reads
17 Citations
5.530 Impact Factor

Metabolic signalling and carbon partitioning: role of Snf1-related (SnRK1) protein kinase.

J Exp Bot 2003 Jan;54(382):467-75

Crop Performance and Improvement, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire AL5 2JQ, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jxb/erg038DOI Listing
January 2003
2 Reads
69 Citations
5.530 Impact Factor

Cereal seed storage proteins: structures, properties and role in grain utilization

Journal of Experimental Botany

Storage proteins account for about 50% of the total protein in mature cereal grains and have important impacts on their nutritional quality for humans and livestock and on their functional properties in food processing. Current knowledge of the structures and properties of the prolamin and globulin storage proteins of cereals and their mechanisms of synthesis, trafficking and deposition in the developing grain is briefly reviewed here. The role of the g uteri proteins of wheat in determining the quality of the grain for breadmaking and how their amount and composition can be manipulated leading to changes in dough mixing properties is also discussed. 

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2002
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Identification of SnIP1, a novel protein that interacts with SNF1-related protein kinase (SnRK1).

Plant Mol Biol 2002 May;49(1):31-44

IACR-long Ashton Research Station, Department of Agricultural Sciences, University of Bristol, Long Ashton, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/a:1014464314113DOI Listing
May 2002
2 Reads
5 Citations
4.260 Impact Factor

Cereal seed storage proteins: structures, properties and role in grain utilization.

J Exp Bot 2002 Apr;53(370):947-58

IACR-Long Ashton Research Station, Department of Agricultural Sciences, University of Bristol, Long Ashton, Bristol BS41 9AF, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jexbot/53.370.947DOI Listing
April 2002
64 Reads
133 Citations
5.530 Impact Factor

The structure and properties of gluten: an elastic protein from wheat grain.

Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 2002 Feb;357(1418):133-42

Institute of Arable Crops Research, Long Ashton Research Station, Department of Agricultural Science, University of Bristol, Long Ashton, Bristol BS41 9AF, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2001.1024DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1692935PMC
February 2002
10 Reads
19 Citations
7.055 Impact Factor

Protein phosphorylation in plants.

Protein phosphorylation in plants.. Collective title: [Proceedings of the Phytochemical Society of Europe No. 39, held at Long Ashton Research Station, Bristol, UK, September 1994.]

http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=ORCID&SrcApp=OrcidOrg&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=CABI&KeyUT=CABI:19970705011&KeyUID=CABI:19970705011

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1996
2 Reads

Tobacco plants transformed with cdc25, a mitotic inducer gene from fission yeast

Plant Molecular Biology

We investigated the effects of expressing a cDNA of cdc25, a mitotic inducer gene of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, on the development of transgenic tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Samsun). Nine independent primary transformants were regenerated containing the cdc25 sequence under the control of a cauliflower mosaic virus 35S gene promoter. Eight of the nine plants showed altered leaf morphology, the lamina being lengthened and twisted and the interveinal regions being pocketed. One of these was sacrificed for analysis of the root meristem, where the cells were found to be significantly smaller than in the wild type. The other seven were grown on and showed precocious flowering, flowers being produced earlier and in significantly greater numbers than in the wild type. They also developed abnormal flowers on short stalks developing in a position normally occupied by the most proximal axillary bud of otherwise normal flower pedicels. The presence or absence of these phenotypes in the primary transformants and in the T2 generation was associated with the presence or absence of detectable levels of cdc25 transcripts.

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1993
1 Read

Willow

Authors:
Hanley, S. J.
1969
1 Read

The wheat GCN2 signalling pathway: does this kinase play an important role in stress signalling?

Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part A: Molecular & Integrative Physiology

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1969
1 Read

The plant-cell cycle

Physiologia Plantarum

The first aim of this paper is to review recent progress in identifying genes in plants homologous to cell division cycle (cdc) genes of fission yeast. In the latter, cdc genes are well-characterised. Arguably, most is known about cdc2 which encodes a 34 kDa protein kinase (p34(cdc2)) that functions at the G2-M and G1-S transition points of the cell cycle. At G2-M, the p34(cdc2) protein kinase is regulated by a number of gene products that function in independent regulatory pathways. The cdc2 kinase is switched on by a phosphatase encoded by cdc25, and switched off by a protein kinase encoded by weel. p34 Must also bind with a cyclin protein to form maturation promoting factor before exhibiting protein kinase activity. In plants, homologues to p34(cdc2) have been identified in pea, wheat, Arabidopsis, alfalfa, maize and Chlamydomonas. They all exhibit the PSTAIRE motif, an absolutely conserved amino acid sequence in all functional homologues sequenced so far. As in animals, some plant species contain more than one cdc2 protein kinase gene, but in contrast to animals where one functions at G2-M and the other (CDK2 in humans and Eg1 in Xenopus) at G1-S, it is still unclear whether there are functional differences between the plant p34(cdc2) protein kinases. Again, whereas in animals cyclins are well characterised on the basis of sequence analysis, into class A, class B (G2-M) and CLN (G1 cyclins), cyclins isolated from several plant species cannot be so clearly characterised. The differences between plant and animal homologues to p34(cdc2) and cyclins raises the possibility that some of the regulatory controls of the plant genes may be different from those of their animal counterparts. The second aim of the paper is to review how planes of cell division and cell size are regulated at the molecular level. We focus on reports showing that p34(cdc2) binds to the preprophase band (ppb) in late G2 of the cell cycle. The binding of p34(cdc2) to ppbs may be important in regulating changes in directional growth but, more importantly, there is a requirement to understand what controls the positioning of ppbs. Thus, we highlight work resolving proteins such as the microtubule associated proteins (MAPs) and those mitogen activated protein kinases (MAP kinases), which act on, or bind to, mitotic microtubules. Plane homologues to MAP kinases have been identified in alfalfa. Finally, some consideration is given to cell size at division and how alterations in cell size can alter plant development. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing the fission yeast gene, cdc25, exhibited various perturbations of development and a reduced cell size at division. Hence, cdc25 affected the cell cycle (and as a consequence, cell size at division) and cdc25 expression was correlated with various alterations to development including precocious flowering and altered floral morphogenesis. Our view is that the cell cycle is a growth cycle in which a cell achieves an optimal size for division and that this size control has an important bearing on differentiation and development. Understanding how cell size is controlled, and how plant cdc genes are regulated, will be essential keys to 'the cell cycle locks', which when 'opened', will provide further clues about how the cell cycle is linked to plant development.

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1969

The case for GM crops

Cook School

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1969
1 Read

Sugar beet

Authors:
May, M. J.
1969
1 Read

Regulation of spinach SNF1‐related (SnRK1) kinases by protein kinases and phosphatases is associated with phosphorylation of the T loop and is regulated by 5′‐AMP

The Plant Journal

Summary Members of the SNF1‐related protein kinase‐1 (SnRK1) subfamily of protein kinases are higher plant homologues of mammalian AMP‐activated and yeast SNF1 protein kinases. Based on analogies with the mammalian system, we surmised that the SnRK1 kinases would be regulated by phosphorylation on a threonine [equivalent to Thr175 in Arabidopsis thaliana SnRK1 (AKIN10)] within the ‘T loop’ between the conserved DFG and APE motifs. We have raised an antibody against a phosphopeptide based on this sequence, and used it to show that inactivation of two spinach SnRK1 kinases by protein phosphatases, and reactivation by a mammalian upstream protein kinase, is associated with changes in the phosphorylation state of this threonine. We also show that dephosphorylation of this threonine by protein phosphatases, and consequent inactivation, is inhibited by low concentrations of 5′‐AMP, via binding to the substrate (i.e. the kinase). This is the first report showing that the plant SnRK1 kinases are regulated by AMP in a manner similar to their mammalian counterparts. The possible physiological significance of these findings is discussed.

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1969
1 Read

Prospects for the use of GM crops in the UK

Water and Environment Manager 8

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1969
1 Read

Opportunities for manipulating the seed protein-composition of wheat and barley in order to improve quality

Transgenic Research

Wheat and barley are the major temperate cereals, being used for food, feed and industrial raw material. However, in all cases the quality may be limited by the amount, composition and properties of the grain storage proteins. We describe how a combination of biochemical and molecular studies has led to an understanding of the molecular basis for breadmaking quality in wheat and feed quality in barley, and also provided genes encoding key proteins that determine quality. The control of expression of these genes has been studied in transgenic tobacco plants and by transient expression in cereal protoplasts, providing the basis for the production of transgenic cereals with improved quality characteristics.

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1969
1 Read

Is there a future for GM crops in the UK?

Society for Experimental Biology Bulletin

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1969
1 Read

Genetic modification of SnRK1 and impact on metabolism in Arabidopsis

Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part A: Molecular & Integrative Physiology

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1969
1 Read

Conservation of control mechanisms for regulation of C and N metabolism

Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part A: Molecular & Integrative Physiology

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1969
1 Read

Metabolic signalling: Role of SnRK1 in regulating sterol biosynthesis

Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part A: Molecular & Integrative Physiology

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1969
1 Read

Top co-authors

Nira Muttucumaru
Nira Muttucumaru

University of Reading

16
Stephen J Powers
Stephen J Powers

School of Life Sciences

16
Donald S Mottram
Donald S Mottram

University of Reading

15
Peter R Shewry
Peter R Shewry

Institute of Food Research

13
Tanya Y Curtis
Tanya Y Curtis

Plant Biology and Crop Science Department

11
Matthew J Paul
Matthew J Paul

University of California

5
Sandra J Hey
Sandra J Hey

Plant Science Department

5
Jennifer Postles
Jennifer Postles

Plant Biology and Crop Science Department

4
Sophie Laurie
Sophie Laurie

University of Bristol

4