Publications by authors named "Niels Zaagman"

3 Publications

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Exploring bacterial interspecific interactions for discovery of novel antimicrobial compounds.

Microb Biotechnol 2017 07 29;10(4):910-925. Epub 2017 May 29.

Department of Microbial Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), PO BOX 50, 6700 AB, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Recent studies indicated that the production of secondary metabolites by soil bacteria can be triggered by interspecific interactions. However, little is known to date about interspecific interactions between Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we aimed to understand how the interspecific interaction between the Gram-positive Paenibacillus sp. AD87 and the Gram-negative Burkholderia sp. AD24 affects the fitness, gene expression and the production of soluble and volatile secondary metabolites of both bacteria. To obtain better insight into this interaction, transcriptome and metabolome analyses were performed. Our results revealed that the interaction between the two bacteria affected their fitness, gene expression and the production of secondary metabolites. During interaction, the growth of Paenibacillus was not affected, whereas the growth of Burkholderia was inhibited at 48 and 72 h. Transcriptome analysis revealed that the interaction between Burkholderia and Paenibacillus caused significant transcriptional changes in both bacteria as compared to the monocultures. The metabolomic analysis revealed that the interaction increased the production of specific volatile and soluble antimicrobial compounds such as 2,5-bis(1-methylethyl)-pyrazine and an unknown Pederin-like compound. The pyrazine volatile compound produced by Paenibacillus was subjected to bioassays and showed strong inhibitory activity against Burkholderia and a range of plant and human pathogens. Moreover, strong additive antimicrobial effects were observed when soluble extracts from the interacting bacteria were combined with the pure 2,5-bis(1-methylethyl)-pyrazine. The results obtained in this study highlight the importance to explore bacterial interspecific interactions to discover novel secondary metabolites and to perform simultaneously metabolomics of both, soluble and volatile compounds.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1751-7915.12735DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5481530PMC
July 2017

Draft Genome Sequence of VU-DES13, Isolated from (Collembola: Entomobryidae).

Genome Announc 2017 May 11;5(19). Epub 2017 May 11.

Department of Ecological Science, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

We present here the draft genome of VU-DES13, which was isolated from the midgut of the soil-living springtail Previous research revealed the presence of gene clusters for the biosynthesis of various secondary metabolites, including β-lactam antibiotics, in the host's genome. The genome data are discussed in the light of the antimicrobial properties against fungi and oomycetes and a high level of β-lactam resistance of the isolate.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/genomeA.00287-17DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5427204PMC
May 2017

Fungus-associated bacteriome in charge of their host behavior.

Fungal Genet Biol 2017 05 30;102:38-48. Epub 2016 Jul 30.

Department Microbial Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology, NIOO-KNAW, PO Box 50, 6700 AB Wageningen, Netherlands. Electronic address:

Bacterial-fungal interactions are widespread in nature and there is a growing number of studies reporting distinct fungus-associated bacteria. However, little is known so far about how shifts in the fungus-associated bacteriome will affect the fungal host's lifestyle. In the present study, we describe for the first time the bacterial community associated with the saprotrophic fungus Mucor hiemalis, commonly found in soil and rhizosphere. Two broad-spectrum antibiotics that strongly altered the bacterial community associated with the fungus were applied. Our results revealed that the antibiotic treatment did not significantly reduce the amount of bacteria associated to the fungus but rather changed the community composition by shifting from initially dominating Alpha-Proteobacteria to dominance of Gamma-Proteobacteria. A novel approach was applied for the isolation of fungal-associated bacteria which also revealed differences between bacterial isolates obtained from the original and the antibiotic-treated M. hiemalis. The shift in the composition of the fungal-associated bacterial community led to significantly reduced fungal growth, changes in fungal morphology, behavior and secondary-metabolites production. Furthermore, our results showed that the antibiotic-treated isolate was more attractive and susceptible to mycophagous bacteria as compared to the original isolate. Overall, our study highlights the importance of the fungus-associated bacteriome for the host's lifestyle and interactions and indicate that isolation with antibacterials is not sufficient to eradicate the associated bacteria.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fgb.2016.07.011DOI Listing
May 2017