Publications by authors named "Nidhi Chopra"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Immediate "Kangaroo Mother Care" and Survival of Infants with Low Birth Weight.

N Engl J Med 2021 05;384(21):2028-2038

The affiliations of the members of the writing committee are as follows: the Department of Maternal, Newborn, Child, and Adolescent Health, and Ageing, World Health Organization, Geneva (S.P.N.R., S.Y., N.M., H.V.J., H.T., R.B.); Vardhman Mahavir Medical College and Safdarjung Hospital (S.A., P.M., N.C., J.S., P.A., K.N., I.S., K.C.A., H.C.) and the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (M.J.S.), New Delhi, and Translational Health Science and Technology Institute, Faridabad (N.W.) - all in India; Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (H.N., E.A., A.M.) and Muhimbili National Hospital (M.N., R.M.) - both in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; the University of Malawi, College of Medicine, Blantyre, Malawi (K.K., L.G., A.T.M., V.S., Q.D.); Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria (C.H.A., O.K., B.P.K., E.A.A.); Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (S.N., R.L.-R., D.A., G.P.-R.) and Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (A.B.-Y., N.W.-B., I.N.), Kumasi, and the School of Public Health, University of Ghana, Accra (A.A.M.) - all in Ghana; Karolinska University Hospital (A.L.) and Karolinska Institute (N.B., A.L., B.W.), Stockholm; the Institute for Safety Governance and Criminology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa (B.M.); and Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway (S.R.).

Background: "Kangaroo mother care," a type of newborn care involving skin-to-skin contact with the mother or other caregiver, reduces mortality in infants with low birth weight (<2.0 kg) when initiated after stabilization, but the majority of deaths occur before stabilization. The safety and efficacy of kangaroo mother care initiated soon after birth among infants with low birth weight are uncertain.

Methods: We conducted a randomized, controlled trial in five hospitals in Ghana, India, Malawi, Nigeria, and Tanzania involving infants with a birth weight between 1.0 and 1.799 kg who were assigned to receive immediate kangaroo mother care (intervention) or conventional care in an incubator or a radiant warmer until their condition stabilized and kangaroo mother care thereafter (control). The primary outcomes were death in the neonatal period (the first 28 days of life) and in the first 72 hours of life.

Results: A total of 3211 infants and their mothers were randomly assigned to the intervention group (1609 infants with their mothers) or the control group (1602 infants with their mothers). The median daily duration of skin-to-skin contact in the neonatal intensive care unit was 16.9 hours (interquartile range, 13.0 to 19.7) in the intervention group and 1.5 hours (interquartile range, 0.3 to 3.3) in the control group. Neonatal death occurred in the first 28 days in 191 infants in the intervention group (12.0%) and in 249 infants in the control group (15.7%) (relative risk of death, 0.75; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.64 to 0.89; P = 0.001); neonatal death in the first 72 hours of life occurred in 74 infants in the intervention group (4.6%) and in 92 infants in the control group (5.8%) (relative risk of death, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.58 to 1.04; P = 0.09). The trial was stopped early on the recommendation of the data and safety monitoring board owing to the finding of reduced mortality among infants receiving immediate kangaroo mother care.

Conclusions: Among infants with a birth weight between 1.0 and 1.799 kg, those who received immediate kangaroo mother care had lower mortality at 28 days than those who received conventional care with kangaroo mother care initiated after stabilization; the between-group difference favoring immediate kangaroo mother care at 72 hours was not significant. (Funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation; Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry number, ACTRN12618001880235; Clinical Trials Registry-India number, CTRI/2018/08/015369.).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa2026486DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8108485PMC
May 2021

Effect of debranning on grains and meal characteristics of different Indian and exotic wheat varieties.

Food Res Int 2019 09 19;123:327-339. Epub 2019 Apr 19.

Department of Biotechnology, Ministry of Science & Technology, Government of India, National Agri-Food Biotechnology Institute (NABI), Mohali 140306, India.

The objective of this work was to evaluated the effects of debranning (2% and 4%) of Indian and exotic wheat varieties on pasting, protein profile and rheological properties of meal. Exotic varieties grains showed significant difference in cooking properties despite having similar protein content. Debranned grains of exotic varieties showed significantly lower water uptake (WU) than those from Indian varieties. Ash content, protein content and mixographic properties (mixing time, dough strength) of meal decreased with increase in extent of debranning. With increase in debranning level unextractable polymeric proteins (UnEx-PP) decreased while unextractable monomeric proteins (UnEx-MP) increased. Exotic varieties had lower extractable PP as compared to Indian wheat varieties. With increase in debranning level pasting parameters (final, breakdown and peak viscosity) increased. Exotic varieties showed the higher gluten strength indicated by mixographic parameters. Wheat grains debranned to 4% debranning level showed better cooking properties. Exotic wheat varieties showed better pasting and mixing properties as compared to Indian wheat varieties.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodres.2019.04.036DOI Listing
September 2019

Hard, medium-hard and extraordinarily soft wheat varieties: Comparison and relationship between various starch properties.

Int J Biol Macromol 2019 Feb 20;123:1143-1149. Epub 2018 Nov 20.

Department of Food Science and Technology, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005, India.

Starches from extraordinarily soft wheat (Ex-SW), medium-hard wheat (MHW) and hard wheat (HW) varieties were evaluated for various properties and their relationship with each other was established. Varieties showed wide variation in grain hardness index (GHI) that varied between 17 and 95. Starches were evaluated for physicochemical properties, granule size distribution, starch morphology, pasting and thermal properties. Starches from MHW showed the presence of the largest proportion of A-type granules and the smallest proportions of B-type and C-type granules whereas Ex-SW showed the greatest proportion of C-type granules. Starches from HW and MHW varieties showed lower swelling power (SP) and higher amylose content (AC) than that from Ex-SW varieties. Starches from HW varieties had greater crystallinity than starches from Ex-SW. Transition temperatures of starch gelatinization decreased with decrease in GHI.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2018.11.192DOI Listing
February 2019

Fractionation and grain hardness effect on protein profiling, pasting and rheological properties of flours from medium-hard and extraordinarily soft wheat varieties.

J Food Sci Technol 2018 Nov 25;55(11):4661-4674. Epub 2018 Sep 25.

2Division of Genetics, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi, 110012 India.

In the present study coarse fraction (CF), medium fine fraction (MFF) and fine fraction (FF) were separated from flours milled from medium-hard and extraordinarily soft wheat varieties and were evaluated for various quality characteristics. Grain hardness of medium-hard and extraordinarily soft wheat varieties varied from 77 to 80 and 17 to 18, respectively. Ash and protein content was the highest for FF and the lowest for CF. Varieties with greater hardness produced higher CF and lower of FF. FF showed higher unextractable polymeric protein (UnEx-PP) and dough stability as compared to MFF and CF. FF showed lower damage starch content as related by lower Sodium SRC (NaSRC) as compared to MFF and FF. CF showed higher paste viscosities than FF and difference were greater amongst fractions from varieties with lower grain hardness. FF with greater proportion of small size particles showed greater accumulation of 98 kDa and 85 kDa PPs than CF. This study demonstrated that fractionation of flours can be employed to produce fractions with varied gluten strength required for production of various products.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13197-018-3433-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6170337PMC
November 2018

Seasonal Variation and Dengue Burden in Paediatric Patients in New Delhi.

J Trop Pediatr 2018 Aug;64(4):336-341

Department of Pediatrics, VMMC and Safdarjung Hospital, New Delhi 29, India.

Objective: We conducted a study to find a relationship between main weather parameters with admission of positive dengue cases in a tertiary hospital.

Methods: Retrospective analysis was undertaken to identify epidemiological trend of dengue in 2016 from paediatric wards of a tertiary hospital in New Delhi. Data were collected on patient particulars and daily weather from January to December 2016.

Results: A total of 266 confirmed cases of dengue were considered. Relative humidity (RH) was associated with burden of positive dengue cases. On week-wise analysis, each surge of dengue admission was preceded by heavy rain 4-6 weeks earlier. Monthly averaged daily temperature range and RH were noted to have strong correlations with dengue burden, keeping an interval of 2 months in between.

Conclusions: Weather parameters seem to influence magnitude of dengue epidemic, particularly in dengue season. There is need to have an in-depth study about developing a prediction model for dengue epidemic.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tropej/fmx077DOI Listing
August 2018

Extraordinarily soft, medium-hard and hard Indian wheat varieties: Composition, protein profile, dough and baking properties.

Food Res Int 2017 10 24;100(Pt 2):306-317. Epub 2017 Aug 24.

Division of Genetics, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi 110012, India.

Hard wheat (HW), medium-hard wheat (MHW) and extraordinarily soft wheat (Ex-SW) varieties with grain hardness index (GHI) of 83 to 95, 72 to 80, 17 to 29 were evaluated for pasting, protein molecular weight (MW) distribution, dough rheology and baking properties. Flours from varieties with higher GHI had more protein content, ash content and paste viscosities. Ex-SW had more glutenins proportion as compared to HW and MHW. Flours from Ex-SW varieties showed lower NaSRC, WA and mixographic parameters as compared to HW and MHW. Dough from flours milled from Ex-SW had higher Intermolecular-β-sheets (IM-β-sheets) than those from MHW and HW. Muffins volume increased with decrease in GHI, Ex-SW varieties had more muffin volume and less air space. The accumulation of polypeptides (PPs) varied significantly in different varieties. Ex-SW variety (QBP12-10) showed accumulation of 98, 90, 81 and 79kDa PPs, which was unique and was different from other varieties.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodres.2017.08.050DOI Listing
October 2017

Neonaticide in India and the stigma of female gender: report of two cases.

Paediatr Int Child Health 2014 Aug 6;34(3):224-6. Epub 2013 Dec 6.

Neonaticide is known to occur across the globe in both developed and developing countries, but has rarely been reported from India. Two similar cases of female neonaticide are presented which were committed by their mothers while in the maternity ward. The social issues and maternal provocation highlighted in this report are different from those reported in world reviews of neonaticide.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1179/2046905513Y.0000000076DOI Listing
August 2014

Acute transverse myelitis following hepatitis E virus infection.

Indian Pediatr 2006 Apr;43(4):365-6

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April 2006
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