Publications by authors named "Nicolina Scibelli"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Laxative Abuse Cessation Leading to Severe Edema.

Cureus 2021 Jun 23;13(6):e15847. Epub 2021 Jun 23.

Internal Medicine, Grand Strand Medical Center, Myrtle Beach, USA.

Stimulant laxatives are a common class of laxatives that is abused by patients with eating disorders. We present a case of a 30-year-old female who presented with dyspnea, peripheral edema and weight gain who had been chronically using laxatives. Her symptoms were consistent with rebound edema caused by sodium and free water shifts with abrupt cessation of excessive stimulant laxative use. This case highlights the use of furosemide as the mainstay treatment for rebound edema and weight gain.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.15847DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8299158PMC
June 2021

Occult Perforated Gangrenous Gallbladder Found on Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography.

Cureus 2021 Jun 19;13(6):e15754. Epub 2021 Jun 19.

Internal Medicine, Grand Strand Medical Center, Myrtle Beach, USA.

Acute gangrenous cholecystitis is a life-threatening disease that is most often diagnosed intraoperatively and can be missed on mildly symptomatic patients without the proper imaging modality. We present a case of a 69-year-old male with a history of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and type 2 diabetes, and a recent right pontine infarct that arrived with 3 out of 10 right-sided abdominal pain. His liver ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) with contrast demonstrated acute cholecystitis. He was initially worked up conservatively and was scheduled for an elective cholecystectomy per surgery recommendation. However erring on the side of caution, the medical team had ordered a magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), which demonstrated perforated gangrenous cholecystitis. Of note, the imaging modalities were ordered within a 24-hour window. The patient's antibiotics were promptly broadened, and he was emergently sent to the operating room. Moving forward, we will identify atypical clinical presentations of gangrenous cholecystitis and consider ordering an MRCP when clinical suspicion remains high and initial imaging is inconclusive. Perforated gangrenous cholecystitis is a severe disease and can cause rapid demise if not identified and treated early.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.15754DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8214500PMC
June 2021

Immunotherapy-Induced Acute Tubulointerstitial Nephritis.

Cureus 2021 May 31;13(5):e15358. Epub 2021 May 31.

Nephrology, Grand Strand Medical Center, Myrtle Beach, USA.

Due to its minimal side-effect profile, immunotherapy has become a popular choice for the treatment of advanced melanoma as compared to conventional chemotherapy. The most common side effects associated with immunotherapy include gastrointestinal, pulmonary, and dermatologic manifestations. However, there have been very few documented occurrences of nephrotoxic side effects. We present a case of a 73-year-old male with a past medical history of chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 3A, metastatic uveal melanoma, and gastroesophageal reflux disease on pantoprazole who arrived at the intensive care unit with altered mental status and creatinine of 27 gm/dl (baseline creatinine of 3 gm/dl about one year prior), after receiving his first dose of ipilimumab and nivolumab approximately 21 days prior. Kidney biopsy demonstrated acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (ATIN). This case highlights the importance of recognizing acute tubulointerstitial nephritis as a side effect of immunotherapy for prompt diagnosis and early treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.15358DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8214499PMC
May 2021

A Retrospective Review of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleed Outcomes During Hospital Admission While on Oral Anticoagulation.

Cureus 2021 May 16;13(5):e15061. Epub 2021 May 16.

Internal Medicine, Grand Strand Medical Center, Myrtle Beach, USA.

Introduction Direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are approved for stroke prevention in non-valvular atrial fibrillation and treatment of venous thromboembolism. Most recent guidelines recommend DOACs over warfarin for most diagnoses given their predictable pharmacodynamics, lack of required monitoring, and safety profile. Specific outcomes such as shock, acute renal failure, and blood transfusion requirement while on oral anticoagulation compared to no anticoagulation remain unknown in patients with upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeds.  Methods This retrospective study used the HCA Healthcare Enterprise Data Warehouse (EDW) to analyze 13,440 patients aged >18 years that were admitted with an upper GI bleed from January 2017 to December 2019. The patients were categorized based on oral anticoagulant (i.e. rivaroxaban, apixaban, dabigatran and warfarin). The control group was patients admitted with an upper GI bleed not on oral anticoagulation. We evaluated the severity of upper GI bleeds while on oral anticoagulation based on the outcomes: mortality rate, length of stay, acute renal failure, shock, and need for packed red blood cell transfusions (pRBC). Comorbid conditions assessed were coronary artery disease (CAD), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), heart failure (HF), atrial fibrillation (AF), venous thromboembolism (VTE), peripheral vascular disease (PVD), tobacco abuse, alcohol abuse, and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Home use of proton pump inhibitors (PPI), aspirin, and P2Y12 inhibitors were also evaluated.  Results Patients on a DOAC without home PPI have a mortality odds ratio of 3.066 with a confidence interval (CI) greater than 95% (1.48-6.26, p<0.05) compared to patients on a DOAC and home PPI. Patients on warfarin and no home PPI have a mortality odds ratio of 5.55 (95% CI (1.02-30.35), p<0.05) compared to those on warfarin with home PPI use. In the no anticoagulation group, those not on PPI have an odds ratio of 3.28 (95% CI (2.54-4.24), p<0.05) of death compared to home PPI use. There was no statistical difference in mortality between each DOAC and warfarin.  There was no difference in the presence of acute renal failure or shock when comparing each DOAC, warfarin, and no medication. For patients presenting with GI bleed, 0.8414 units of pRBC were transfused. Patients not on oral anticoagulation were found to have statistically significant decrease in pRBC transfusion if they did not report alcohol use, CKD, HF, AF, VTE, PVD. Patients on DOACs and alcohol use have an average pRBC transfusion count that is 0.922 units more than those without reported alcohol use (p=0.006). In the warfarin group, there was no statistical significance noted when comparing pRBC transfusions and also when comparing to baseline comorbidities. Conclusion The retrospective study leads us to conclude that overall, patients taking the DOACs or warfarin had no statistically significant increase in RBC transfusions, length of stay, shock, acute renal failure, or mortality rate compared to patients who were not on oral anticoagulation. Home PPI use was shown to lower odds of mortality in patients on anticoagulation who presented with upper GI bleeding. PPI use had no effect on the need for transfusion or length of stay in patients on anticoagulation. These results can help predict which patients are likely to have higher mortality based on the use of home PPIs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.15061DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8208175PMC
May 2021

Hepatic Artery Pseudoaneurysm Presenting as Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage.

Cureus 2021 Mar 30;13(3):e14190. Epub 2021 Mar 30.

Internal Medicine, Grand Strand Medical Center, Myrtle Beach, USA.

A hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm (HAP) is a rare complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. It can vary in its clinical presentation; however, given its severe nature, prompt assessment and management are crucial. We report a case of a 73-year-old male who underwent a laparoscopic cholecystectomy complicated by a right hepatic artery injury. This subsequently presented as a life-threatening case of upper gastrointestinal bleeding from HAP, with presumable hemobilia and septic shock from multiple liver abscesses. The diagnosis was made with computed tomography angiography (CTA) of the abdomen and pelvis followed by visceral angiography. The patient ultimately underwent a right hepatectomy for definitive treatment. The primary objective of this case is to highlight a less novel, though rare, case presentation and define a spectrum of treatment options available based on severity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.14190DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8083905PMC
March 2021

Intestinal Dysbiosis Disguised as a Rectal Fistula Treated With Autologous Fecal Microbiota Transplantation.

Cureus 2021 Mar 25;13(3):e14115. Epub 2021 Mar 25.

Gastroenterology, Grand Strand Medical Center, Myrtle Beach, USA.

Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has been efficacious in the treatment of intestinal dysbiosis, derangement of the native intestinal microflora, and the indications for autologous FMT are growing. A 69-year-old Caucasian man with a past medical history of paraplegia secondary to motor vehicle accident and sigmoid-end colostomy presented to his gastroenterologist with the complaint of rectal discharge. A complicated medical course pre-dated his presentation and included multiple decubitus ulcers requiring debridement and several courses of broad-spectrum antibiotics. The rectal discharge was initially presumed to be from a fistula leading to one of his ulcers; however, workup with anoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy, and magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvis showed no visible perirectal abscess or connection to the sigmoid colon through a fistula. Intestinal dysbiosis was an alternative theory considered to be the cause of his copious rectal discharge due to his several courses of broad-spectrum antibiotics and prolonged inactivity of his gut. This prompted a trial treatment plan utilizing autologous FMT, with the patient administering enemas containing his own stool to the distal limb of his bowel. As a result of this treatment, the patient's chief complaint completely resolved within days of initiating treatment, although symptoms did eventually return. We would like to propose that further randomized studies should be done to investigate autologous FMT as a treatment for patients suffering from intestinal dysbiosis following sigmoid-end colostomy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.14115DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8075766PMC
March 2021

Metastatic Small-Cell Lung Cancer Presenting as Primary Adrenal Insufficiency.

Case Rep Oncol Med 2020 11;2020:7018619. Epub 2020 Mar 11.

Department of Internal Medicine, Grand Strand Medical Center, Myrtle Beach, SC, USA.

A 40-year-old male smoker with HIV was admitted for cough, hypotension, and abdominal pain for 5 days. Chest radiography showed a right lower lobe consolidation. CT of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis revealed paratracheal adenopathy, a 5.8 × 4.5 cm mass invading the right bronchus intermedius, and dense bilateral adrenal masses, measuring 5.4 × 4.0 cm on the right and 4.8 × 2.0 cm on the left. Laboratory studies showed white blood cell count of 18.5 K/mm, sodium of 131 mmol/L, creatinine of 1.6 mg/dL, and CD4 count of 567 cells/mm. The random morning cortisol level was 7.0 g/dL, the ACTH stimulation test yielded inappropriate response, and a random serum ACTH was elevated at 83.4 pg/mL. MRI brain revealed no pituitary adenoma confirming primary adrenal insufficiency. The adrenal CT washout study was consistent with solid mass content, concerning for metastasis. Bronchoscopy with endobronchial mass and paratracheal lymph node biopsy confirmed small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Intravenous steroids, 100 mg hydrocortisone every 8 hours, improved his hypotension and abdominal pain. PET scan revealed metabolically active right paratracheal mass, right hilar mass, and bilateral adrenal masses. Treatment included palliative chemotherapy consisting of carboplatin/etoposide/atezolizumab and chest radiation. We present this novel case to demonstrate SCLC's ability to cause primary adrenal insufficiency, as well as evaluate clinical response to chemotherapeutics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2020/7018619DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7106905PMC
March 2020
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